Indradhvaja, aka: Indra-dhvaja; 7 Definition(s)

Introduction

Indradhvaja means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Indradhvaja in Purana glossary... « previous · [I] · next »

Indradhvaja (इन्द्रध्वज).—A flag staff. It is erected in order to get rain. If anybody dreams that it has broken and fallen, it is a bad omen. It means that some disaster will befall the country. (Agni Purāṇa, Chapter 229).

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopaedia

Indradhvaja (इन्द्रध्वज).—The fall of Cāṇūra, compared to the falling of.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa X. 44. 23.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

Indradhvaja in Jyotisha glossary... « previous · [I] · next »

Indradhvaja (इन्द्रध्वज) refers to the “Indra’s banner” and is the name of the forty-fifth chapter of the Gārgīyajyotiṣa. It is similar to the 43rd chapter of Vārahamihira’s work known as the Bṛhatsaṃhitā. The Gārgīyajyotiṣa is one of the most comprehensive of Garga’s texts and written in the form of a dialogue between Krauṣṭuki (Ṛṣiputra) and Garga discussing astral and other omens, comprising a total of sixty-two chapters (viz., indra-dhvaja), known as aṅgas and summarized in the Aṅgasamuddiśa (“enumeration of the divisions”, introductory portion).

Source: Wisdom Library: Jyotiṣa
Jyotisha book cover
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Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Indradhvaja in Mahayana glossary... « previous · [I] · next »

Indradhvaja (इन्द्रध्वज) is the name of a Buddha under whom Śākyamuni (or Gautama, ‘the historical Buddha’) acquired merit along the first through nine bhūmis, according to the Mahāvastu. There are in total ten bhūmis representing the ten stages of the Bodhisattva’s path towards enlightenment.

Indradhvaja is but one among the 500 Buddhas enumerated in the Mahāvastu during a conversation between Mahākātyāyana and Mahākāśyapa, both principle disciples of Gautama Buddha. The Mahāvastu is an important text of the Lokottaravāda school of buddhism, dating from the 2nd century BCE.

Source: Wisdom Library: Lokottaravāda
Mahayana book cover
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Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Indradhvaja in Marathi glossary... « previous · [I] · next »

indradhvaja (इंद्रध्वज).—m S The guḍhī q. v. erected on New year's day.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary
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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Indradhvaja in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [I] · next »

Indradhvaja (इन्द्रध्वज).—

1) a flag raised on the 12th day of the bright half of Bhādra.

2) Indra's weapon; विस्रस्ताकल्पकेशस्रगिन्द्रध्वज इवापतत् (visrastākalpakeśasragindradhvaja ivāpatat) Bhāg.1.44.22.

Derivable forms: indradhvajaḥ (इन्द्रध्वजः).

Indradhvaja is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms indra and dhvaja (ध्वज).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Indradhvaja (इन्द्रध्वज).—(1) n. of various former Buddhas: Mv i.138.4; iii.226.6 (with capital Indratapanā); Av i.105.3 ff.; 84,000 former Buddhas of this name, Mv i.58.14; 62.4; a Buddha in the southwest quarter, SP 184.11; (2) n. of a nāga: Mvy 3363.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary
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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 1995 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Indra
Indra (इन्द्र).—m. (-ndraḥ) 1. The deity presiding over Swarga or the Hindu paradise, and the s...
Mahendra
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Dhvaja
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Indrakila
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Indrajit
Indrajit (इन्द्रजित्).—m. (-jit) The son of Ravana. E. indra and jit who conquers: the conquero...
Indranila
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Indrasena
Indrasena (इन्द्रसेन).—n. of a nāga: Mvy 3310.
Makaradhvaja
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Dharmadhvaja
Dharmadhvaja (धर्मध्वज).—n. of several different former Buddhas: Gv 257.2; 259.2; 284.8; 427.2;...
Indrayudha
Indrāyudha (इन्द्रायुध).—m. (-dhaḥ) The rainbow. f. (-dhā) A kind of leech of various tints on ...
Indraprastha
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Mrigendra
Mṛgendra (मृगेन्द्र).—m. (-ndraḥ) A lion. E. mṛga an animal, indra lord, master.
Indrajala
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Ritadhvaja
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