Ekatala, Ēkatāla, Ekatāla, Eka-tala: 6 definitions

Introduction

Ekatala means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: Shodhganga: The significance of the mūla-beras (natya)

Ekatala refers to a “rhythm with one beat” of music and dance play, as defined in Cilappatikāram: an ancient epic authored by Ilango Adigal representing an important piece of Tamil literature.—Madavi sang and danced with the four parts, ukkiram–first line, turuvai–second line, ābokam–third line, prakalai–last line, playing the rhythmic syllables in the right order, adding music. Then she started with ata-tala (rhythm with three beats) having three svaras in every beat, and then she finished in eka-tala (rhythm with one beat) which has one svara for one beat.

Natyashastra book cover
context information

Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Shilpashastra (iconography)

Source: Shodhganga: The significance of the mūla-beras (śilpa)

Ekatāla (एकताल) refers to a type of measurement, as defined in the texts dealing with śilpa (arts and crafs), known as śilpaśāstras.—The unit of measurement chosen for stating the proportions of the images of the various gods, goddesses and other beings belonging to the Hindu pantheon is called the tāla. The ekatāla is prescribed for Kabhandhas.

Shilpashastra book cover
context information

Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

ēkatāla (एकताल).—m A time or measure of music.

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ēkatāla (एकताल) [or ली, lī].—a Of the measure ēkatāla.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Ekatāla (एकताल).—a. Having a single palm tree; एकताल एवोत्पातपवनप्रेरितो गिरिः (ekatāla evotpātapavanaprerito giriḥ) R.15.23.

Ekatāla is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms eka and tāla (ताल).

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Ekatāla (एकताल).—harmony, accurate adjustment of song, dance, and instrumental music (cf. tauryatrikam).

Derivable forms: ekatālaḥ (एकतालः).

Ekatāla is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms eka and tāla (ताल).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ekatāla (एकताल).—m.

(-laḥ) Harmony, unison, the accurate adjustment of song, dance, and instrumental music. f. (-lī) An instrument for heating time, any instrument having but one note. E. eka one, uniform, and tāla musical measure or time.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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See also (Relevant definitions)

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