Civilization: 1 definition

Introduction:

Civilization means something in the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

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India history and geography

Source: archive.org: Rajatarangini (Ranjit Sitaram Pandit) (history)

Civilization is based not only on men but on animals and plants. [...]. The old world civilization was based on cereals, wheat, barley and rice and the elephant, the horse, the cow and sheep. [...] If it is possible to determine where cereals and cattle were first domesticated, we could go a long way towards tracing civilization to its source. [...] There are two distinct groups of wheat. One centre is in Abyssinia, the other, from which the more important group of wheats is derived, in or near South Eastern Afghanistan. The former is taken to be the original home of the agriculture which led up to Egyptian civilization, the latter the source of Indian and Mesopotamian wheats and of the more important varieties grown in Europe and North America to-day.

There was also a civilizationin the valley of the Indus of which so far we know little as the writing on clay tablets has not yet been deciphered. The civilizations of ancient India and that of Mesopotamia had perhaps a common origin and in any case they must have been in contact.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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