Bhringa, Bhṛṅga: 17 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Bhringa means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Bhṛṅga can be transliterated into English as Bhrnga or Bhringa, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Rasashastra (chemistry and alchemy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Rasa-śāstra

Bhṛṅga (न्हृङ्ग).—The name of a plant, possibly identified with Eclipta alba. It is used in various alchemical processess related to mercury (rasa or liṅga), according to the Rasārṇavakalpa (11th-century work dealing with Rasaśāstra).

Rasashastra book cover
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Rasashastra (रसशास्त्र, rasaśāstra) is an important branch of Ayurveda, specialising in chemical interactions with herbs, metals and minerals. Some texts combine yogic and tantric practices with various alchemical operations. The ultimate goal of Rasashastra is not only to preserve and prolong life, but also to bestow wealth upon humankind.

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Kavya (poetry)

[«previous next»] — Bhringa in Kavya glossary
Source: Shodhganga: Mankhaka a sanskrit literary genius

Bhṛṅga (भृङ्ग) was one of the brothers of Maṅkhaka (or Maṅkha or Maṅkhuka): the author of the Śrīkaṇṭhacarita and the Maṅkhakośa.

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Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: academia.edu: The Yoga of the Mālinīvijayottaratantra

Bhṛṅga (भृङ्ग) refers to one of the ten kinds of sounds (śabda) according to the Matsyendrasaṃhitā.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Bhṛṅga (भृङ्ग) refers to a “golden vase”, which is mentioned as an item of wealth in order to demonstrate the wicked nature of gambling (durodara), according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.1.17.—Accordingly, “[...] O mistress! where is that gambling rogue of a son, Guṇanidhi? Or let it be. Why should I ask for him? [...] That gem-set (maṇimaṇḍita) golden vase (bhṛṅga) which I had given you is also missing. That tripod with a velvet cushion which I had given you is nowhere to be seen. [...]”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Shodhganga: Edition translation and critical study of yogasarasamgraha

Bhṛṅga (भृङ्ग) is another name for “Bhṛṅgarāja” and is dealt with in the 15th-century Yogasārasaṅgraha (Yogasara-saṅgraha) by Vāsudeva: an unpublished Keralite work representing an Ayurvedic compendium of medicinal recipes. The Yogasārasaṃgraha [mentioning bhṛṅga] deals with entire recipes in the route of administration, and thus deals with the knowledge of pharmacy (bhaiṣajya-kalpanā) which is a branch of pharmacology (dravyaguṇa).

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: archive.org: Trisastisalakapurusacaritra

Bhṛṅga (भृङ्ग) refers to one of the ten kinds of wishing-trees (kalpa), according to chapter 1.1 [ādīśvara-caritra] of Hemacandra’s 11th century Triṣaṣṭiśalākāpuruṣacaritra (“lives of the 63 illustrious persons”): a Sanskrit epic poem narrating the history and legends of sixty-three important persons in Jainism.—Accordingly, “[...] among the Utttarakuras the land is naturally beautiful, with sand as sweet as sugar and waters resembling autumn-moonlight. Ten kinds of wishing-trees [viz., Bhṛṅga] always give to the people whatever they desire without effort on their part. [...] the Bhṛṅgas give dishes, [...] These give definite objects, and also indefinite ones; and other wishing-trees there give all things desired. [...]”.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

bhṛṅga (भृंग) [or भृंगराज, bhṛṅgarāja].—m (S) A large black bee, the humble bee.

--- OR ---

bhṛṅgā (भृंगा) [or गी, gī].—f (bhaṅgā S) Hemp-plant, Cannabis sativa.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

bhṛṅga (भृंग).—m The humble bee.

--- OR ---

bhṛṅgā (भृंगा) [-gī, -गी].—f Hemp-plant, Cannabis sativa.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Bhṛṅga (भृङ्ग).—[bhṛ-gan kit nuṭ ca Uṇ.1.122.]

1) A large black bee; मञ्जु गुञ्जन्तु भृङ्गाः (mañju guñjantu bhṛṅgāḥ) Bv.1.5; R.8.53.

2) A kind of wasp.

3) A kind of bird.

4) A libertine, dissolute or lecherous man; cf. भ्रमर (bhramara).

5) A golden vase or jar.

6) The fork-tailed shrike.

7) A kind of measure (in music).

-ṅgam Talc.

-ṅgī 1 The female of the large black bee; भृङ्गीव पुष्पं पुरुषं स्त्री वाञ्छति नवं नवम् (bhṛṅgīva puṣpaṃ puruṣaṃ strī vāñchati navaṃ navam).

2) A poisonous plant (ativiṣa).

Derivable forms: bhṛṅgaḥ (भृङ्गः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bhṛṅga (भृङ्ग).—m.

(-ṅgaḥ) 1. A large black bee, the humble bee. 2. A catamite, a libertine, a lecher. 3. A plant, (Eclipta or Verbesina prostrata.) 4. A wasp, either the common kind, or the Vespa solitaria. 5. A golden vase. 6. The fork-tailed shrike, (Lanius cærulescens.) 7. A bird, apparently a sort of shrike different from the preceding. n.

(-ṅgaṃ) 1. Woody cassia. 2. Talc. E. bhṛ to nourish, gan Unadi aff., and kit-nuṭ augment.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bhṛṅga (भृङ्ग).—probably bhram-ga, I. m., and f. ([Kathāsaritsāgara, (ed. Brockhaus.)] 22, 103). 1. A large bee, [Raghuvaṃśa, (ed. Stenzler.)] 8, 52. 2. A wasp. 3. The fork-tailed shrike, Lanius cærulescens, [Ṛtusaṃhāra] 6, 24 (cf. [Lassen, Anthologia Sanskritica.] 52, 18). 4. A golden vase. 5. A libertine. Ii. n. 1. A plant, Woody cassia. 2. Another, Verbesina prostrata Roxb.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bhṛṅga (भृङ्ग).—[masculine] a large black bee ([feminine] ā & ī).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

Bhṛṅga (भृङ्ग) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—son of Viśvāvarta, brother of Maṅkha. Śrīkaṇṭhacarita 3, 53.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Bhṛṅga (भृङ्ग):—m. (√bhram) a species of large black bee, the humble bee, [Kāvya literature; Purāṇa]

2) a species of wasp, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) the fork-tailed shrike or some similar bird, [Vāgbhaṭālaṃkāra]

4) a libertine, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) a golden vase or pitcher, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) Name of a genius (= bhṛṅga-rāja), [Hemādri’s Caturvarga-cintāmaṇi]

7) (in music) a kind of measure, [Saṃgīta-sārasaṃgraha]

8) m. or n. Eclipta Prostrata, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

9) Bhṛṅgā (भृङ्गा):—[from bhṛṅga] f. a large black bee (See m.), [Atharva-veda]

10) [v.s. ...] a kind of pulse, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

11) Bhṛṅga (भृङ्ग):—n. the bark or the leaf of Laurus Cassia, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

12) talc, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

13) Name of a man (brother of Maṅkha), [Śrīkaṇṭha-carita]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bhṛṅga (भृङ्ग):—(ṅgaḥ) 1. m. A large black bee, fork-tailed shrike; a lecher; a wasp; a golden vase; a plant. n. Woody Cassia; Talc.

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Sanskrit-Wörterbuch in kürzerer Fassung

Bhṛṅga (भृङ्ग):——

1) m. — a) eine grosse schwarze Bienenart. — b) *eine Art Wespe. — c) der gabelschwänzige Würger. — d) *ein liederlicher Geselle , Galan. — e) *ein goldener Wasserkrug. — f) ein best. Genius , = bhṛṅgarāja [Hemādri’s Caturvargacintāmaṇi 1,654,9.] — g) ein best. Tact [Saṃgitasārasaṃgraha 236.] —

2) (*m. n.) Eclipta prostata.

3) f. bhṛṅgā = 1)a). —

4) f. bhṛṅgī — a) = 1)a) [Dhanaṃjayavijaya 3,7.] — b) *Aconitum ferox.

5) *n. — a) die Rinde oder das Blatt der Laurus Cassia. — b) Talk [Rājan 13,114.]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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