Bhringin, Bhṛṅgin: 8 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Bhringin means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Bhṛṅgin can be transliterated into English as Bhrngin or Bhringin, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Kavya (poetry)

[«previous next»] — Bhringin in Kavya glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Kathāsaritsāgara

Bhṛṅgin (भृङ्गिन्) is the name of a Gaṇa (attendant of Śiva and/or Pārvatī), according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 50. Accordingly: “... And the divine beings, Vīrabhadra, Mahākāla, Bhṛṅgin and others, ministered to them viands produced by Sumeru by magic, and others supplied by the cow Kāmadhenu, ordered to do so by Śiva; and they waited upon every single guest according to his rank”.

The story of Bhṛṅgin was narrated by the Vidyādhara king Vajraprabha to prince Naravāhanadatta in order to relate how “Sūryaprabha, being a man, obtain of old time the sovereignty over the Vidyādharas”.

The Kathāsaritsāgara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Bhṛṅgin, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravāhanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyādharas (celestial beings). The work is said to have been an adaptation of Guṇāḍhya’s Bṛhatkathā consisting of 100,000 verses, which in turn is part of a larger work containing 700,000 verses.

context information

Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Bhṛṅgin (भृङ्गिन्).—m.

1) The fig-tree.

2) Name of an attendant of Śiva; तयोः कारणयोः सद्यः संभूतौ शंकरात्मजौ । एको भृङ्गसमः कृष्णो भिन्नाञ्जनसमोऽपरः । भृङ्गी तस्य तदा ब्रह्मा नाम भृङ्गीति चाकरोत् (tayoḥ kāraṇayoḥ sadyaḥ saṃbhūtau śaṃkarātmajau | eko bhṛṅgasamaḥ kṛṣṇo bhinnāñjanasamo'paraḥ | bhṛṅgī tasya tadā brahmā nāma bhṛṅgīti cākarot) || Vamana. P.; also भृङ्गिः (bhṛṅgiḥ)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Bhṛṅgin (भृङ्गिन्).—name of a great ṛṣi: Mahā-Māyūrī 256.17.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Bhṛṅgin (भृङ्गिन्).—m. (-ṅgī) 1. One of Siva'S chamberlains. 2. The Indian fig-tree. E. bhṛṅga a bee, ini aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Bhṛṅgin (भृङ्गिन्):—[from bhṛṅga] m. the Indian fig-tree, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

2) [v.s. ...] Name of one of Śiva’s attendants (cf. bhṛṅgariṭi, giriṭa etc.), [Kathāsaritsāgara]

3) [v.s. ...] [plural] Name of a people, [Varāha-mihira]

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Sanskrit-Wörterbuch in kürzerer Fassung

Bhṛṅgin (भृङ्गिन्):——

1) m. — a) *der indische Feigenbaum. — b) Nomen proprium — α) eines Wesens im Gefolge Śiva's. — β) Pl. einer Völkerschaft. —

2) *f. bhṛṅgiṇī ein best. Baum [Rājan 11,211.]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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