Trikala, aka: Trikalā, Tri-kala; 7 Definition(s)

Introduction

Trikala means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Trikalā (त्रिकला, “three digits”):—The account found in the Devī-Māhātmya where the Goddess is born from the unified energies (tejas) of the gods:—Here too, the divine maiden represents the unified energies (śakti) of the three male divinities. The gods name her Trikalā (‘three digits’,) and ask her to assume three different forms. She thus becomes threefold, assuming a white, red, and black form.

These three forms are correlated the three primary male deities:—

  1. The bright body with beautiful hips is Brahmī, and creation comes forth from her auspiciously as ordained by Brahmā’s creative role.
  2. The beautiful, red-colored, middle body is the goddess Vaiṣṇavī, who bears conch and dics. She is known as Kalā. She protects the whole universe and is called Viṣṇumāyā.
  3. The black-colored body, the goddess Raudrī, bears a trident and has a terrible face. She destroys the univers.

The three colors of this goddess’s different forms are those that are associated with the guṇas of prakṛti.

Source: Google Books: Rise of the Goddess in the Hindu Tradition
Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Purana

Trikala in Purana glossary... « previous · [T] · next »

Trikalā (त्रिकला) is the name of a Goddess born from the combined looks of Brahmā, Viṣṇu and Rudra or Maheśvara (Śiva), according to the Varāhapurāṇa chapter 90.

She assumed three forms according to the colors she consisted of:

  1. From Brahmā’s energy came the white body known as Brāhmī,
  2. From Viṣṇu’s energy came the red body known as Vaiṣṇavī,
  3. From Rudra’s energy came the black body known as Raudrī,

The Varāhapurāṇa is categorised as a Mahāpurāṇa, and was originally composed of 24,000 metrical verses, possibly originating from before the 10th century. It is composed of two parts and Sūta is the main narrator.

Source: Wisdom Library: Varāha-purāṇa
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Chandas (prosody, study of Sanskrit metres)

Trikala in Chandas glossary... « previous · [T] · next »

Trikala (त्रिकल) refers to one of the 23 types of dohā metres (a part of mātrā type) described in the 1st chapter of the Vṛttamauktika by Candraśekhara (17th century): author of many metrical compositions and the son of Lakṣmīnātha Bhaṭṭa and Lopāmudrā.

Source: Shodhganga: a concise history of Sanskrit Chanda literature
Chandas book cover
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Chandas (छन्दस्) refers to Sanskrit prosody and represents one of the six Vedangas (auxiliary disciplines belonging to the study of the Vedas). The science of prosody (chandas-shastra) focusses on the study of the poetic meters such as the commonly known twenty-six metres mentioned by Pingalas.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Trikala (त्रिकल) is the name of a deity who received the Kāmikāgama from Praṇava through the mahānsambandha relation, according to the pratisaṃhitā theory of Āgama origin and relationship (sambandha). The kāmika-āgama, being part of the ten Śivabhedāgamas, refers to one of the twenty-eight Siddhāntāgamas: a classification of the Śaiva division of Śaivāgamas. The Śaivāgamas represent the wisdom that has come down from lord Śiva, received by Pārvatī and accepted by Viṣṇu.

Trikala obtained the Kāmikāgama from Praṇava who in turn obtained it from Sadāśiva through parasambandha. Trikala in turn, transmitted it to Hara who then, through divya-sambandha, transmitted it to the Devas who, through divyādivya-sambandha, transmitted it to the Ṛṣis who finally, through adivya-sambandha, revealed the Kāmikāgama to human beings (Manuṣya). (also see Anantaśambhu’s commentary on the Siddhāntasārāvali of Trilocanaśivācārya)

Source: Shodhganga: Iconographical representations of Śiva
Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Trikala in Marathi glossary... « previous · [T] · next »

trikāla (त्रिकाल).—m (S) pop. trikāḷa m The three times--the past, the present, the future: also the three periods of the day--morning, noon, evening. Valuable compounds are formed with trikāla: of such many follow in order. Such as trikāla-pūjā- snāna-naivēdya-sandhyā-bhōktā-bhōjī-snāyī-rakṣaka, and nume- rous others demand no explanation, and are created and abandoned with the occasion. trikāḷīṃ At a late season or hour, i. e. in the time after noon;--with reference to the usual forenoon or noon-meal. Ex. tri0 bhōjana kēlyāmuḷēṃ prakṛti ḍhaḷalī. Also, with accommodation of sense to the cases, trikāḷācā & trikāḷānēṃ.

--- OR ---

trikāla (त्रिकाल).—ad (S) pop. trikāḷa ad At the three parts or divisions of the day--at morning, noon, and evening: also in the three times--in the past, the present, and the future.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

trikāla (त्रिकाल) [-ḷa, -ळ].—m The 3 periods–the past, the present, the future; the 3 times of the day–morning, noon, evening. ad At the three parts of the day-at morning, noon, and evening; also the three times-in the past, the present, and the future.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Trikāla (त्रिकाल).—

1) the three times; the past, the present, and the future; or morning, noon and evening.

2) the three tenses (the past, present, and future) of a verb.

-lam ind. three times, thrice; °jña, °darśin a. omniscient (m.)

Derivable forms: trikālam (त्रिकालम्).

Trikāla is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms tri and kāla (काल).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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