Candrashekhara, aka: Candraśekhara, Candra-shekhara; 14 Definition(s)

Introduction

Candrashekhara means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Candraśekhara can be transliterated into English as Candrasekhara or Candrashekhara, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

Alternative spellings of this word include Chandrashekhara.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Candrashekhara in Purana glossary... « previous · [C] · next »

Candraśekhara (चन्द्रशेखर).—A King (son of Pauṣya). The following story about his birth is told in the Padma Purāṇa.

Though married for a long time Pauṣya did not have an issue. He began worshipping Śiva to be blessed with a son. Śiva was pleased at this and he gave him a fruit which he divided equally among his three wives. In due course the three wives delivered. But, to get the full and complete form of a child the three children had to be joined together, and so the parts were unified. This boy was Candraśekhara. Thus Candraśekhara acquired the name Tryaṃbaka.

Candraśekhara married Tārāvatī, daughter of Kakutstha, a King of the solar dynasty. On account of the curse of Kapotamuni two sons, Bhṛṅgi and Mahākāla were born to Tārāvatī in Vetāla yoni and Bhairava yoni respectively. Dama, Uparicara and Alarka were sons born to Candraśekhara himself. (Aurasaputras).

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopaedia

Candraśekhara (चन्द्रशेखर).—See Śiva.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 24. 60; 25. 2, 44; 32. 18; IV. 30. 71; 34. 91.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Candrashekhara in Shaivism glossary... « previous · [C] · next »

Candraśekhara (चन्द्रशेखर).—There are two mythological stories to explain the name Candraśekhara. One is the famous episode of churning of the ocean. (Viṣṇupurāṇa, I, 15; Śivapurāṇa, Liṅgapurāṇa and Bhārata) According to another story, the Moon married the twenty-seven daughters of Dakṣa. (Liṅgapurāṇa, Śivapurāṇa, Bhāgavata, Harivaṃśa etc.)

Source: Archaeological Survey of India: Śaiva monuments at Paṭṭadakal (śaivism)
Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Shilpashastra (iconography)

Candrashekhara in Shilpashastra glossary... « previous · [C] · next »

Candraśekhara (चन्द्रशेखर) is found as a sculpture on the exterior (southern wall) of the temple of Trailokyeśvara.—Standing Śiva with a hair dress like that of Lakulaśiva saints. He holds in his upper hands the trident and a battle axe. It looks as if he is in sanñcāri-pāda, walking pose. Lower arms are damaged.

Source: Archaeological Survey of India: Śaiva monuments at Paṭṭadakal (śilpa)

1) Candraśekhara (चन्द्रशेखर) or Candraśekharamūrti refers to one of the eighteen forms (mūrti) of Śiva mentioned in the Kāraṇāgama (pratimālakṣaṇavidhi-paṭala): the fourth among the Siddhāntaśaivāgamas. The forms of Śiva (eg., Candra-śekhara) are established through a process known as Sādākhya, described as a five-fold process of creation.

2) Candraśekhara is also listed among the eight forms (mūrti) of Śiva mentioned in the Rauravāgama: the sixteenth among the Siddhāntaśaivāgamas.

3) Candraśekhara is also listed among the ten forms (mūrti) of Śiva mentioned in the Ajitāgama (under the Maheśvararūpa heading): the fifth among the Siddhāntaśaivāgamas.

4) Candraśekhara is also listed among the sixteen forms (mūrti) of Śiva mentioned in the Dīptāgama: the sixth among the Siddhāntaśaivāgamas.

Source: Shodhganga: Iconographical representations of Śiva (shilpa)

Candraśekhara (or Candraśekar) is the name of a deity depicted in the Jambukeswarar Temple in Tiruvānaikoyil (Thiruvanaikaval) which is one of the Pañcasabhā or “five halls where Śiva is said to have danced”.—Candraśekar (Candraśekhara) is represented standing in samapāda-sthānaka with four hands. The upper right hand holds paraśu and the upper left hand holds mṛga (deer) in kartarīmukha hasta and the lower right hand is in abhaya and the lower left hand is in kaṭaka-hasta.

Candraśekhara is also depicted at the Nellaiappar Temple at Tirunelveli, representing a sacred place for the worship of Śiva.—Candraśekhara is represented standing in samapāda-sthānaka with four hands. The upper right hand holds paraśu, the upper left hand holds mṛga (deer) in kartarīmukha-hasta, the lower right hand is in abhaya and the lower left hand is in kaṭaka-hasta. Bhavāni

Source: Shodhganga: The significance of the mūla-beras (śilpa)
Shilpashastra book cover
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Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

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Chandas (prosody, study of Sanskrit metres)

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Candraśekhara (चन्द्रशेखर) (17th century) or Candraśekhara Bhaṭṭa is the author of Vṛttamauktika (which was completed by his father), also author of many metrical compositions, is the son of Lakṣmīnātha Bhaṭṭa and Lopāmudrā. He belongs to Vasiṣṭhagotra. His father Lakṣmīnātha was also an exponent on Sanskrit metrics as well360.

Vinayasagar, the editor of Vṛttamauktika notes that Rāmacandra Bhaṭṭa, great grandfather of Candraśekhara migrated from Andhrapradesh (then Tailaṅga country). He was the son of Lakṣmaṇabhaṭṭa Somayājin, a brahmin of Taittirīyaśākha of Yajurveda and Āpastamba-tripravara and also belonged to Bhāradvājagotra. He was given to his maternal uncle as a dattaka-putra.

Source: Shodhganga: a concise history of Sanskrit Chanda literature
Chandas book cover
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Chandas (छन्दस्) refers to Sanskrit prosody and represents one of the six Vedangas (auxiliary disciplines belonging to the study of the Vedas). The science of prosody (chandas-shastra) focusses on the study of the poetic meters such as the commonly known twenty-six metres mentioned by Pingalas.

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Rasashastra (chemistry and alchemy)

Candrashekhara in Rasashastra glossary... « previous · [C] · next »

Candraśekhara (चन्द्रशेखर) is the name of an Ayurvedic recipe defined in the fourth volume of the Rasajalanidhi (chapter 2, dealing with jvara: fever). These remedies are classified as Iatrochemistry and form part of the ancient Indian science known as Rasaśāstra (medical alchemy). Pārvatīśaṅkara is an ayurveda treatment and should be taken with caution and in accordance with rules laid down in the texts.

Accordingly, when using such recipes (eg., candra-śekhara-rasa): “the minerals (uparasa), poisons (viṣa), and other drugs (except herbs), referred to as ingredients of medicines, are to be duly purified and incinerated, as the case may be, in accordance with the processes laid out in the texts.” (see introduction to Iatro chemical medicines)

Source: Wisdom Library: Rasa-śāstra
Rasashastra book cover
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Rasashastra (रसशास्त्र, rasaśāstra) is an important branch of Ayurveda, specialising in chemical interactions with herbs, metals and minerals. Some texts combine yogic and tantric practices with various alchemical operations. The ultimate goal of Rasashastra is not only to preserve and prolong life, but also to bestow wealth upon humankind.

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Katha (narrative stories)

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Candraśekhara (चन्द्रशेखर) is the name of an ancient king from Suvarṇadvīpa, as mentioned in the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 123. Accordingly, “... and that king [of Suvarṇadvīpa], whose name was Candraśekhara, and who was the brother-in-law of King Guṇasāgara, heard the whole story from the people in the ship. Then the king, finding that Guṇavatī was the daughter of his sister, took her into his palace, and out of joy celebrated a feast”.

The Kathāsaritsāgara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Candraśekhara, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravāhanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyādharas (celestial beings). The work is said to have been an adaptation of Guṇāḍhya’s Bṛhatkathā consisting of 100,000 verses, which in turn is part of a larger work containing 700,000 verses.

Source: Wisdom Library: Kathāsaritsāgara
Katha book cover
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Katha (कथा, kathā) refers to narrative Sanskrit literature often inspired from epic legendry (itihasa) and poetry (mahākāvya). Some Kathas reflect socio-political instructions for the King while others remind the reader of important historical event and exploits of the Gods, Heroes and Sages.

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India history and geogprahy

Candrashekhara in India history glossary... « previous · [C] · next »

Candraśekhara (चन्द्रशेखर) is one of the eight temples located in a space to the north of the village Paṭṭadakal, arrayed in a rectangle of about 180 x 140 m on the western bank of the river.

Source: Wisdom Library: India History

Candraśekhara is the name of a temple at Paṭṭadakal.—This is not a miniature shrine, but a minor one on the site, in comparison with the two grand monuments between which it has been built, Galaganātha and Vijayeśvara. It does not enter in the different classes of temples identified at Paṭṭadakal. It consists in a simple vimāna without tower, an antechamber and a wider maṇḍapa, a separate Nandin platform. The cella devoid of decoration shelters a Liṅga. An original feature is the doorframe on the east cella wall, with a dvārapāla on each side. The antechamber, narrower than the cella has niches with elaborate frame comprising adhiṣṭhāna, pilasters, kapota and śālā, on its lateral sides. It opens directly on the much wider maṇḍapa which is devoid of decoration.

Source: Archaeological Survey of India: Śaiva monuments at Paṭṭadakal

Candraśekhara (चन्द्रशेखर) is the brother of Viśvanātha: a teacher of Gaṅgādharakavi (19th century): the son of Viṭṭhala and Rukmiṇī and also disciple of Viśvanātha, the brother of Candraśekhara. Gaṅgādharakavi was born in a Mahārāṣṭra Brahmin family and migrated to Nagpur from Maṅgrūl village in Buldana district of Berar. He was the contemporary of king Raghujī III and his successor Jānojī. Gaṅgādharakavi composed 14 works and commentaries in Sanskrit. Vṛttacandrikā is the lone work on Prosody.

Source: Shodhganga: a concise history of Sanskrit Chanda literature (history)
India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Candrashekhara in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [C] · next »

Candraśekhara (चन्द्रशेखर).—epithets of Śiva; ('having the moon for his crest', 'moon-crested'); रहस्युपालभ्यत चन्द्र- शेखरः (rahasyupālabhyata candra- śekharaḥ) Ku.5.58,86; R.6.34; नखेन कस्य धन्यस्य चन्द्रचूडो भविष्यति (nakhena kasya dhanyasya candracūḍo bhaviṣyati) Udb.

Derivable forms: candraśekharaḥ (चन्द्रशेखरः).

Candraśekhara is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms candra and śekhara (शेखर). See also (synonyms): candracūḍa, candramauli, candracūḍāmaṇi.

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

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