Skandhaka, Skamdhaka: 7 definitions

Introduction:

Skandhaka means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Chandas (prosody, study of Sanskrit metres)

[«previous next»] — Skandhaka in Chandas glossary
Source: Journal of the University of Bombay Volume V: Apabhramsa metres (2)

Skandhaka (स्कन्धक) refers to a variation Gīti, which itself is a variety of Gāthā: one of the oldest Prakrit meters probably developed out of the epic Anuṣṭubh, as discussed in books such as the Chandonuśāsana, Kavidarpaṇa, Vṛttajātisamuccaya and Svayambhūchandas.—Among the metres derived from the Gāthā, Gīti, Upagīti and Udgīti are most important. Gīti is made with two first halves of a Gāthā. [...] If in a Gīti, pañcamātras were substituted for any of the caturmātras without any restriction, it gets the name Vicitrā, and if a caturmātra is substituted for the last long letter in each half, the Gīti is called Skandhaka.

Chandas book cover
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Chandas (छन्दस्) refers to Sanskrit prosody and represents one of the six Vedangas (auxiliary disciplines belonging to the study of the Vedas). The science of prosody (chandas-shastra) focusses on the study of the poetic meters such as the commonly known twenty-six metres mentioned by Pingalas.

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In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

[«previous next»] — Skandhaka in Mahayana glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra

Skandhaka (स्कन्धक) refers to a “chapter” (of a compilation or text), according to Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra (chapter 3).—Accordingly, “[...] Finally a Brahmin monk named Kātyāyana, wise and of keen faculties (tīkṣnendriya), completely recited the three Baskets (tripiṭaka), the inner and outer texts (ādhyātmika-bahya-sūtra). Wishing to explain the words of the Buddha, he compiled the jñānaprasthānāṣṭagrantha. The first chapter (skandhaka) deals with the supreme worldly Dharmas (laukikāgradharma). Subsequently, his disciples made from it a vibhāṣā for people of ages to come who could not completely understand the Aṣṭagrantha (or Jñānaprasthāna)”.

Mahayana book cover
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Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

[«previous next»] — Skandhaka in Jainism glossary
Source: archive.org: Trisastisalakapurusacaritra

Skandhaka (स्कन्धक) refers to a kind of ārya-meter, according to chapter 1.2 [ādīśvara-caritra] of Hemacandra’s 11th century Triṣaṣṭiśalākāpuruṣacaritra (“lives of the 63 illustrious persons”): a Sanskrit epic poem narrating the history and legends of sixty-three important persons in Jainism. Accordingly, “[...] After reciting a hymn of praise delightful with various dhruvakas, ślokas, utsāhas and skandhakas also, with galitas, vastuvadanas, and prose, the Indra of Acyuta with, his gods slowly emptied the pitchers over the Lord of the World. Being turned over the Master’s head, the water-pitchers shone like rain-clouds over the peak of Sumeru”.—(cf. See Hemacandra Chandonuśāsana, chapter 4, padas 6 and 7, pp. 30f.)

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Skandhaka.—(EI 3; HRS), known from Gujara-Pratīhāra records; name of a tax; probably, a cess at a certain rate per shoulder-load. Note: skandhaka is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Skandhaka in Sanskrit glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Skandhaka (स्कन्धक):—[from skandha] n. a kind of Āryā metre, [Varāha-mihira’s Bṛhat-saṃhitā; Kāvyādarśa]

[Sanskrit to German]

Skandhaka in German

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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Skandhaka in Kannada glossary
Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Skaṃdhaka (ಸ್ಕಂಧಕ):—[noun] = ಸ್ಕಂಧ - [skamdha -] 10.

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Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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