Giti, aka: Gīti; 7 Definition(s)

Introduction

Giti means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Chandas (prosody, study of Sanskrit metres)

1) Gīti (गीति) is a type of mātrāvṛtta (quantitative verse) described in the Gītiprakaraṇa section of the second chapter of Kedārabhaṭṭa’s Vṛttaratnākara. The Vṛttaratnākara is considered as most popular work in Sanskrit prosody, because of its rich and number of commentaries. Kedārabhaṭṭa (C. 950-1050 C.E.) was a celebrated author in Sanskrit prosody.

2) Gīti (गीति) refers to one of the twenty-seven mātrāvṛttas (quantitative verse) dealt with in the second chapter of the Vṛttamuktāvalī, ascribed to Durgādatta (19th century), author of eight Sanskrit work and patronised by Hindupati: an ancient king of the Bundela tribe (presently Bundelkhand of Uttar Pradesh). A Mātrāvṛtta (eg., gīti) refers to a type of metre found in classical Sanskrit poetry.

3) Gīti (गीति) refers to one of the 34 mātrāvṛttas (syllabo-quantitative verse) dealt with in the Vṛttamaṇimañjūṣā, whose authorship could be traced (also see the “New Catalogus Catalogorum” XXXI. p. 7).

4) Gīti (गीति) refers to one of the thirty mātrāvṛtta (quantitative verse) mentioned in the 331st chapter of the Agnipurāṇa. The Agnipurāṇa deals with various subjects viz. literature, poetics, grammar, architecture in its 383 chapters and deals with the entire science of prosody (eg., the gīti metre) in 8 chapters (328-335) in 101 verses in total.

5) Gīti (गीति) refers to one of the thirty-four mātrāvṛtta (quantitative verse) mentioned in the Garuḍapurāṇa. The Garuḍapurāṇa also deals with the science of prosody (eg., the gīti) in its six chapters 207-212. The chapters comprise 5, 18, 41, 7 and 9 verses respectively.

Source: Shodhganga: a concise history of Sanskrit Chanda literature
Chandas book cover
context information

Chandas (छन्दस्) refers to Sanskrit prosody and represents one of the six Vedangas (auxiliary disciplines belonging to the study of the Vedas). The science of prosody (chandas-shastra) focusses on the study of the poetic meters such as the commonly known twenty-six metres mentioned by Pingalas.

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Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

1) Gīti (गीति) refers to one of the twenty aspects of tāla (time-measure), according to the Nāṭyaśāstrahapter chapter 28. In musical performance, tāla refers to any rhythmic beat or strike that measures musical time. It is an important concept in ancient Indian musical theory (gāndharvaśāstra) traceable to the Vedic era.

2) Gīti (गीति) refers to an ancient system of classification of rhythms, according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 29. They also include special formations of syllables and variation in speed.

There are four gītis defined:

  1. māgadhī,
  2. ardhamāgadhī,
  3. sambhāvitā,
  4. pṛthulā.

According to the Nāṭyaśāstra, “these gītis are known to be without any connexion with the dhruvās. But they are always to be applied by the musicians in the gāndharva only”.

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

Gīti (गीति).—Mataṅga mentions seven gītis which are “modes or styles of song”:

  1. śuddha,
  2. bhinna,
  3. gauḍi,
  4. rāgagīti,
  5. sādhāraṇi,
  6. bhāṣā,
  7. vibhāṣā.

He quotes Durgaśakti’s gītis as

  1. śuddha,
  2. bhinna,
  3. vesara,
  4. gauḍa,
  5. sādhārita.

According to the school of Bharata the gītis are

  1. māgadhī,
  2. ardhamāgadha,
  3. sambhāvita,
  4. pṛthula.

The ‘great soul’, Yāṣṭika is quoted as mentioning three gītis,

  1. bhāṣā,
  2. vibhāṣā,
  3. antarabhāṣā;

Mataṅga is said to propound bhāṣāgīti and vibhāṣā. The Śārdūla school is said to approve of one gīti only, viz., bhāṣā. (cf Mataṅga’s 9th century Bṛhaddeśī)

Source: archive.org: The Ragas Of Karnatic Music
Natyashastra book cover
context information

Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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General definition (in Hinduism)

The gīti meter has 12, 18, 12 and 18 mātrās in its four pādas respectively.

Vṛttaratnākara lists several other conditions.

Source: WikiPedia: Hinduism

Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

gīti (गीति).—f S Song or singing. 2 A form of the Arya metre. The couplet consists of two long verses.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

gīti (गीति).—f Singing. A form of the āryā metre.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Gīti (गीति).—f. [gai-bhāve ktin]

1) A song; अहोरागपरिवाहिणी गीतिः (ahorāgaparivāhiṇī gītiḥ) Ś.5; श्रुताप्सरोगीतिरपि क्षणेऽस्मिन् हरः प्रसंख्यानपरो बभूव (śrutāpsarogītirapi kṣaṇe'smin haraḥ prasaṃkhyānaparo babhūva) Ku.3.4.

2) Name of a metre; see App.

3) A Sāma mantra; गीतिभिर्मधुरैः स्निग्धैर्मन्त्राह्वानैर्यथार्हतः (gītibhirmadhuraiḥ snigdhairmantrāhvānairyathārhataḥ) Rām.1.14.9.

Derivable forms: gītiḥ (गीतिः).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 17 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Gityarya
Gītyāryā (गीत्यार्या) refers to one of the thirty mātrāvṛtta (quantitative verse) mentioned in ...
Aryagiti
1) Āryāgīti (आर्यागीति) is a type of mātrāvṛtta (quantitative verse) described in the Gītipraka...
Citra
Citra (चित्र) refers to a “depiction of a painting-two dimensional” and represents a classifica...
Dakshina
Dakṣiṇa (दक्षिण) refers to a “hero who has several wives and treats each one equally without pa...
Tala
Tala (तल).—n. (-laṃ) 1. Essential nature, (in composition especially, as mahītalaṃ the earth it...
Vritti
Vṛtti.—(SITI), means; livelihood, occupation; grant of land for one's livelihood. (SII 3), land...
Sambhavita
Saṃbhāvita (संभावित).—p. p.1) Considered, supposed, imagined; पित्राहं दोषेषु संभावितः (pitrāha...
Gativritti
Gativṛtti (गतिवृत्ति).—Special style of playing on string-instruments. This style was dependant...
Magadhi
Māgadhī (मागधी).—A river which flows through the middle of five mountains. (Sarga 32, Bāla Kāṇḍ...
Matravritta
Mātrāvṛtta (मात्रावृत्त).—a metre regulated by the number of prosodial instants it contains, e....
Prithula
Pṛthula (पृथुल) participated in the war between Rāma and Rāvaṇa, on the side of the latter, as ...
Vigiti
Vigīti (विगीति).—f. (-tiḥ) 1. Reproach, censure, abuse. 2. Contradiction. 3. Singing in various...
Ardhamagadhi
Ardhamāgadhī (अर्धमागधी).—Name of a dialect in which many of Jaina Canonical books are written....
Vrittamanimanjusha
Vṛttamaṇimañjūṣā (वृत्तमणिमञ्जूषा) is the name of a text dealing with Sanskrit prosody (chandas...
Udgatha
Udgāthā (उद्गाथा).—A variety of the Āryā measure, the same as Gīti. q. v.

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