Dhruvaka: 8 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Dhruvaka means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous (D) next»] — Dhruvaka in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Dhruvaka (ध्रुवक).—A warrior of Subrahmaṇya. (Mahābhārata Śalya Parva, Chapter 45, Stanza 75).

Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Dhruvaka (ध्रुवक) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. IX.44.60) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Dhruvaka) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Chandas (prosody, study of Sanskrit metres)

Source: Journal of the University of Bombay Volume V: Apabhramsa metres (2)

Dhruvaka (ध्रुवक) is the name of a catuṣpadi metre (as popularly employed by the Apabhraṃśa bards), as discussed in books such as the Chandonuśāsana, Kavidarpaṇa, Vṛttajātisamuccaya and Svayambhūchandas.—Dhruvaka has 9 mātrās in each of its four lines, divided into the groups of 5 and 4 mātrās.

Chandas book cover
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Chandas (छन्दस्) refers to Sanskrit prosody and represents one of the six Vedangas (auxiliary disciplines belonging to the study of the Vedas). The science of prosody (chandas-shastra) focusses on the study of the poetic meters such as the commonly known twenty-six metres mentioned by Pingalas.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: archive.org: Trisastisalakapurusacaritra

Dhruvaka (ध्रुवक) refers to an “introductory verse”, according to chapter 1.2 [ādīśvara-caritra] of Hemacandra’s 11th century Triṣaṣṭiśalākāpuruṣacaritra (“lives of the 63 illustrious persons”): a Sanskrit epic poem narrating the history and legends of sixty-three important persons in Jainism. Accordingly, “[...] After reciting a hymn of praise delightful with various dhruvakas, ślokas, utsāhas and skandhakas also, with galitas, vastuvadanas, and prose, the Indra of Acyuta with, his gods slowly emptied the pitchers over the Lord of the World. Being turned over the Master’s head, the water-pitchers shone like rain-clouds over the peak of Sumeru”.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

dhruvaka (ध्रुवक).—m S The numbers set down at first as the groundwork of certain calculations to determine a tithi, graha &c.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Dhruvaka (ध्रुवक).—

1) The introductory stanza of a song (repeated as a sort of chorus); see ध्रुव (dhruva).

2) A trunk, stem.

3) A post.

4) Polar longitude.

Derivable forms: dhruvakaḥ (ध्रुवकः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Dhruvaka (ध्रुवक).—m.

(-kaḥ) 1. The trunk of a lopped tree. 2. Longitude. f.

(-kā) The introductory stanza and burden of a song: see dhruvā E. kan added to the preceding.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Dhruvaka (ध्रुवक):—[from dhruva] m. the unchangeable longitude of fixed stars, [Sūryasiddhānta]

2) [v.s. ...] post, pale, stake, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) [v.s. ...] (in music) = dhruvā f.

4) [v.s. ...] Name of an attendant of Skanda, [Mahābhārata]

5) Dhruvakā (ध्रुवका):—[from dhruvaka > dhruva] f. (in music) = dhruvā f. (cf. dhuvakā)

6) [v.s. ...] Name of a woman [gana] bāhv-ādi.

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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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