Pujayitva, Pūjayitvā: 5 definitions

Introduction:

Pujayitva means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Pujayitva in Shaktism glossary
Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Pūjayitvā (पूजयित्वा) refers to “having worshipped” (the great transmission), according to the Kularatnoddyota verse 2.21-27.—Accordingly, “[...]  He worshipped (pūjayitvā) the Great Transmission with hymns and excellent divine lauds, by exhibiting the Great Gestures and with salutations and the waving of lamps along with divine words of praise and rites of adoration centered on the Maṇḍala and the Krama. Taking up then the energizing (substances), O fair one, he who does all things, was conjoined with the goddess. O Supreme mistress, praised by the heroes, the Lord of the heroes and the universal Self took up the vessel with the meat and put it in (his) mouth along with the sacrificial pap. [...]”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Pujayitva in Shaivism glossary
Source: SOAS University of London: Protective Rites in the Netra Tantra

Pūjayitvā (पूजयित्वा) refers to “having worshipped”., according to the Netratantra of Kṣemarāja: a Śaiva text from the 9th century in which Śiva (Bhairava) teaches Pārvatī topics such as metaphysics, cosmology, and soteriology.—Accordingly, [verse 10.1-7ab, while describing the appearance and worship of Bhairava]—“[...] He] bears a sword and shield, holds a hook and noose. [His] hand[s and posed] in the wish fulfilling and protection [mudrās. He] holds the thunderbolt of a great hero. [He also] holds an axe and a hatchet. Having worshipped (pūjayitvā) Bhairava, [the Mantrin] remembers being joined in union [with] him, [in the same way as] dissolution in fire”.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Pujayitva in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Pūjayitvā (पूजयित्वा) refers to “having paid homage” (to Gaṇeśa), according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.4.17 (“The Resuscitation of Gaṇeśa”).—Accordingly, after Śiva spoke to the Gods: “Then they carried out Śiva’s behests and acted accordingly. They brought the headless body of Gaṇeśa and washed it well. They paid homage to it (pūjayitvā) and started towards the north. It was a single-tusked elephant that they met. They took the head and fitted it to the body. After joining it, the gods bowed to Śiva, Viṣṇu and Brahmā and spoke—‘What has been ordered by you has been carried out by us. Let the task left incomplete be performed now’”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Ganapatya (worship of Ganesha)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - (Ganesha)

Pūjayitvā (पूजयित्वा) refers to “those who should be worshipped” (by devotees of Gaṇeśa), according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.4.18 (“Gaṇeśa crowned as the chief of Gaṇas”).—Accordingly, as Śiva said to Gaṇeśa: “[...] After making the eight-petalled lotus diagram on the ground in accordance with Vedic injunctions a sacrifice shall be performed by the liberal people who have no disinclination to spend money. Two women and two students shall be worshipped (pūjayitvā) and fed in front of the idol duly. [...]”.

context information

Ganapatya (गाणपत्य, gāṇapatya) represents a tradition of Hinduism where Ganesha is revered and worshipped as the prime deity (ishta-devata). Being a minor though influential movement, Ganapatya evovled, llike Shaktism and Shaivism, as a separate movement leaving behind a large body of literature.

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In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

[«previous next»] — Pujayitva in Mahayana glossary
Source: De Gruyter: A Buddhist Ritual Manual on Agriculture

Pūjayitvā (पूजयित्वा) refers to “having worshipped (with great worship)”, according to the Vajratuṇḍasamayakalparāja, an ancient Buddhist ritual manual on agriculture from the 5th-century (or earlier), containing various instructions for the Sangha to provide agriculture-related services to laypeople including rain-making, weather control and crop protection.—Accordingly, [after the Bhagavān explained the great heart-dhāraṇī], “Then Samantākāraparikaracchatra, the great Nāga king, [...] Vaiśravaṇacitra, [...]: These leaders of 84,000 Nāga kings, each surrounded by 77,000 of Nāga troops belonging to their abode, approached the Bhagavān, went up to him, circumambulated him three times, worshipped (pūjayitvā) him with great worship, and having bowed down at his feet said to the Bhagavān, ‘[...]’”.

Mahayana book cover
context information

Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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