Pravishat, Praviśat, Pra-vishat: 3 definitions

Introduction:

Pravishat means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Praviśat can be transliterated into English as Pravisat or Pravishat, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Pravishat in Shaktism glossary
Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Praviśat (प्रविशत्) (Cf. Praviśantī) refers to “entering (into one’s own body)”, according to the Kulakaulinīmata verse 4.136-140.—Accordingly, “The goddess Nityā is always white and, completely full, resides in the circle of the moon. She is adorned with a rosary of crystal and a book. She is in the middle of a forest of Kadamba trees and enters (praviśat) into one’s own body. The principle (over which she presides) is between the vital breath and is located above (Śiva) the Tranquil One. One should repeat it along with emission at the beginning and end of the Vidyā. One should make it enter with the force of a river carrying along with it all the scriptures. Once placed within the heart, one becomes the Lord of Speech himself. He knows all that is made of speech and contemplates the principle which is the meaning of all written prose. O great goddess! By reciting it a 100,000 times a man becomes a (great) poet”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Pancaratra (worship of Nārāyaṇa)

Source: Universität Wien: Sudarśana's Worship at the Royal Court According to the Ahirbudhnyasaṃhitā

Praviśat (प्रविशत्) [=Praviśantī?] refers to “possession” (by demons), according to the Ahirbudhnyasaṃhitā, belonging to the Pāñcarātra tradition which deals with theology, rituals, iconography, narrative mythology and others.—Accordingly, “[...] [The demons born of] the aggressive magic of [his] enemies, having failed to take hold of him, frightened will possess (praviśantī) the performer [of the ritual], like a river[’s fury] blocked by a mountain. Droughts will end and enemies will run away. In his kingdom there will not be dangers in the form of untimely deaths, wild animals, beasts of prey, thieves, illnesses etc. and strength shall reside in his lineage”.

Pancaratra book cover
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Pancaratra (पाञ्चरात्र, pāñcarātra) represents a tradition of Hinduism where Narayana is revered and worshipped. Closeley related to Vaishnavism, the Pancaratra literature includes various Agamas and tantras incorporating many Vaishnava philosophies.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

[«previous next»] — Pravishat in Jainism glossary
Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Praviśat (प्रविशत्) [=Praviśantī?] refers to “entering” (a particular hell), according to the 11th century Jñānārṇava, a treatise on Jain Yoga in roughly 2200 Sanskrit verses composed by Śubhacandra.—Accordingly, “They fall from that place [and] immediately they enter (praviśat) the Rasātala hell. They roam about the whole world like the wind [and] they fall down into the Naraka hell. They fall from that place [and] immediately they enter the Rasātala hell. They roam about the whole world like the wind [and] they fall down into the Naraka hell”.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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