Avishat, Āviśat, A-vishat: 2 definitions

Introduction:

Avishat means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Āviśat can be transliterated into English as Avisat or Avishat, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions

1) Āviśat (आविशत्) refers to the “entering” (of diseases) [?].—The moon also forms an important element of Pāśupata yogic practices. As we learn from the Skandapurāṇa (179.28ff.), as pointed out by Bakker (2015, 141), their “accomplishment in yoga” comes about through a process of withdrawing the senses until the practitioner can see a lunar disc in his heart. From the moonlight within his body, yogic powers, omniscience and the like arise. These powers include being immune (na-āviśat) to disease and possessing a divine body.

2) Āviśat (आविशत्) refers to “fully penetrating” (causing the various powers to arise), according to the Īśvarapratyabhijñāvimarśinī (KSTS vol. 65, 330).—Accordingly, “[...] Thus, due to practicing [this insight], the qualities of His consciousness, which are aspects of Śakti, fully penetrate (āviśat) [those various levels], causing the [various] powers to arise. But even without practice, in the [rare] case of an instantaneous immersion into That, one obtains the state of liberation-in-life through the process of the direct experience of [the Five Mystic States]: Bliss, Ascent, Trembling, Sleep, and ‘Whirling,’ which means Pervasion”.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

Discover the meaning of avishat or avisat in the context of Shaivism from relevant books on Exotic India

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Āviśat (आविशत्) refers to the “onset (of pain)” [e.g., “a great pain entered the army”], according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.4.9 (“Boasting of Tāraka”).—Accordingly, as Tāraka-Asura fought with the Gods: “[...] When Indra fell down there was a great hue and cry. On seeing it a great pain entered (āviśat) the army of the gods. Know from me the vile action that Tāraka has committed against virtue which is sure to bring about his own ruin. He stamped on Indra with his foot after he fell down and seized his thunderbolt with which he hit him with great force. [...]”.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Discover the meaning of avishat or avisat in the context of Purana from relevant books on Exotic India

See also (Relevant definitions)

Relevant text

Let's grow together!

I humbly request your help to keep doing what I do best: provide the world with unbiased sources, definitions and images. Your donation direclty influences the quality and quantity of knowledge, wisdom and spiritual insight the world is exposed to.

Let's make the world a better place together!

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: