Mutra, Mūtra: 19 definitions

Introduction:

Mutra means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany

Mūtra (मूत्र) is a Sanskrit technical term translating to “urine”. The term is used throughout Ayurvedic literature such as the Suśruta-saṃhitā and the Caraka-saṃhitā.

Source: gurumukhi.ru: Ayurveda glossary of terms

Mūtra (मूत्र):—One of the liquid form of Āhāra-mala. Urine. Function of Mūtra is to carry away Kleda (watery waste) from the body.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Śaivism

Mūtra (मूत्र) refers to “cow-urine”. It is one of the six products of the cow, used in the worshop of the liṅga (known as goṣaḍaṅgavidhi), according to the Śivadharmottarapurāṇa

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Mūtra (मूत्र) refers to “urine”, according to the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, while describing the signs of one who is a Siddha: “[...] (Such a man) does not feel fear (even if) there is terrible cold or heat outside or he suffers a bad accident. He is very intelligent and his accomplishment is close at hand. He is not greedy or sick and is forbearing. (His) urine is good [i.e., su-mūtra] and sweet smelling and (he passes) little stool. (He possesses) a serene beauty and the first sign of success in Yoga (that he displays) is its fine profundity. [??] and (instead of criticizing, he) praises the good qualities (of people) when they are out of sight”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Mūtra (मूत्र) refers to “urine”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.15 (“The penance and reign of Tārakāsura”).—Accordingly, as Brahmā narrated: “[...] At the same time, several phenomena of evil portent forboding misery and distress happened, when the son of Varāṅgī was born making the gods miserable. [...] Beasts in sheds and forests roamed here and there in great fright as though beaten and driven about, passing urine and shitting dungs [i.e., śakṛt-mūtra] as they pleased. Frightened cows sprayed blood through their udders; their eyes brimmed with tears, clouds showering putrid matter became terrifying. [...]”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Vastushastra (architecture)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (architecture)

Mūtra (मूत्र) refers to “urine”, according to the Devyāmata (in the section śalyoddhāra-paṭala or “excavation of extraneous substances”).—Accordingly, “[...] If a cow [which has entered the site] urinates (mūtra) or drops dung, there are pieces of silver or gold [beneath the site, respectively]. If a cat urinates (mūtra) or drops dung, [the officiant] should prognosticate a piece of iron or an inauspicious thing (? aśam) [beneath the site,] respectively”.

Vastushastra book cover
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Vastushastra (वास्तुशास्त्र, vāstuśāstra) refers to the ancient Indian science (shastra) of architecture (vastu), dealing with topics such architecture, sculpture, town-building, fort building and various other constructions. Vastu also deals with the philosophy of the architectural relation with the cosmic universe.

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In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra

Mūtra (मूत्र, “urine”) (Pali Mutta) refers to “urine” and represents one of the thirty-substances of the human body according to the Visuddhimagga, as mentioned in an appendix of the 2nd century Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra chapter 32-34. The Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra mentions thirty-six substances [viz., mūtra]; the Sanskrit sources of both the Lesser and the Greater Vehicles, physical substances are 26 in number while the Pāli suttas list thirty-once substances.

Mahayana book cover
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Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

mūtra (मूत्र).—n (S) Urine.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Mūtra (मूत्र).—Urine; नाप्सु मूत्रं समुत्सृजेत् (nāpsu mūtraṃ samutsṛjet) Manusmṛti 4.56; मूत्रं चकार (mūtraṃ cakāra) 'made water'.

Derivable forms: mūtram (मूत्रम्).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mūtra (मूत्र).—n.

(-traṃ) Urine, piss. E. mūtra to piss, ghañ aff.; or muc to loose, Unadi aff. tran, and ū substituted for the vowel; or mūtra-ac .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mūtra (मूत्र).— (vb. mih and aff. tra), n. Urine, piss, [Pañcatantra] 121, 15.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mūtra (मूत्र).—[neuter] urine.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mūtra (मूत्र):—n. ([probably] [from] √ = mīv; but cf. [Uṇādi-sūtra iv, 162]) the fluid secreted by the kidneys, urine (mūtraṃ √1. kṛ, to make water), [Atharva-veda]; etc.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Mūtra (मूत्र):—(ka) mūtrayati 10. a. To urine.

2) (traṃ) 1. n. Urine.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Mūtra (मूत्र) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Mutta.

[Sanskrit to German]

Mutra in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Mūtra (मूत्र):—(nm) urine, piss; -[kṛccha] painful discharge of urine-strangury; -[doṣa] uranaemia; urinary trouble; -[dhānī] urinal stall; -[nalī] urinary duct; -[nirodha/rodha] ischuria; -[parīkṣā] urine test; -[mārga] urethra, ureter; -[viṣayaka] urinary; -[śūla] see -[kṛccha].

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Mūtra (ಮೂತ್ರ):—[noun] the yellowish, slightly acidic liquid excreted periodically as waste matter, by the kidneys of humans and animals; urine.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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