Mekala, Mekalā, Mēkala: 12 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Mekala means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1) Mekalā (मेकला).—The capital of the Puṣpamitras;1 rule of seven kings from.2

  • 1) Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 74. 188.
  • 2) Vāyu-purāṇa 99. 375.

2) Mekala (मेकल).—A Vindhyan tribe.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 16. 63; Matsya-purāṇa 114. 52.
Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Mekala (मेकल) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. VI.10.39, VI.47.13, VI.83.9, VIII.17.3, VIII.17.20) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Mekala) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

Mekala (मेकल) is the name of a mountain said to be located within the Dākṣiṇāpatha (Deccan) region. Countries within this region pertain to the Dākṣinātyā local usage (pravṛtti) according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 14. These pravṛttis provide information regarding costumes, languages, and manners in different countries of the world.

Natyashastra book cover
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Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Śāktism

Mekala (मेकल) is the name of a Śāktapīṭha mentioned in the Kulārṇavatantra. The Kulārṇava-tantra is an important 11th century work for the Kaula school of Śāktism. It refers to eighteen such Śākta-pīṭhas (e.g. Mekala) which is defined as a sacred sanctuary of Devī located here on earth. According to legend, there are in total fifty-one such sanctuaries (pīṭha) on earth, created from the corresponding parts of Devī’s body,

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Kavya (poetry)

Source: Shodhganga: The Kavyamimamsa of Rajasekhara

Mekala (मेकल) is the name a locality mentioned in Rājaśekhara’s 10th-century Kāvyamīmāṃsā.—It is the part of Vidhya range called Amarakantaka. From where the river Narmadā rises.

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Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names

Name of a tribe, occurring in a nominal list. Ap.ii.359; the reading is, however, very uncertain.

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Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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India history and geogprahy

Source: Project Gutenberg: Castes and Tribes of Southern India, Volume 1

1) Mekala (“goat”) is one of the many exogamous septs (division) among the Boyas (an old fighting caste of Southern India). The Boyas were much prized as fighting men in the stirring times of the eighteenth century .

2) Mekala (“goats”) is one of the exogamous septs (divisions) among the Kapus (the largest caste in the Madras Presidency). The Kapus or Reddis (Ratti) appear to have been a powerful Dravidian tribe in the early centuries of the Christian era. The term Kapu means a watchman, and Reddi means a king.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Mekala (मेकल).—

1) Name of a mountain; (also mekhala).

2) A goat.

Derivable forms: mekalaḥ (मेकलः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mekala (मेकल).—mf.

(-laḥ-lā) 1. Name of a certain part of Vind'hya mountain. 2. A goat.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mekala (मेकल).—[masculine] [plural] [Name] of a people.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Mekala (मेकल):—m. Name of a mountain in the Vindhya, [Viṣṇu-purāṇa; Haravijaya]

2) (?) of a Ṛṣi (father of the river Narma-dā), [ib.]

3) [plural] of a people, [Mahābhārata]

4) of a dynasty, [Viṣṇu-purāṇa]

5) Mekalā (मेकला):—[from mekala] f. Name of the river Narma-dā (Nerbudda), [ib.]

6) [v.s. ...] of a town, [ib.],

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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