Mahila, Mahilā, Mahīlā: 19 definitions

Introduction:

Mahila means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit, Hindi, biology. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

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In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany

Mahilā (महिला) is a synonym for Priyaṅgu, which is a Sanskrit name for a medicinal plant (Callicarpa macrophylla). It is a technical term used throughout Ayurvedic literature such as the Caraka-saṃhitā and the Suśruta-saṃhitā. This synonym was identified by Amarasiṃha in his Amarakośa (a Sanskrit botanical thesaurus from the 4th century). It is also mentioned as a synonym in the Bhāvaprakāśa-nighaṇṭu (medicinal thesareus) authored by Bhāvamiśra 16th century, in which it is listed as Mahilāhvayā.

Source: Wisdom Library: Local Names of Plants and Drugs

Mahila [ମହିଳା] in the Odia language is the name of a plant identified with Ichnocarpus frutescens (L.) W. T. Aiton from the Apocynaceae (Oleander) family having the following synonyms: Apocynum frutescens, Echites frutescens, Quirivelia frutescens. For the possible medicinal usage of mahila, you can check this page for potential sources and references, although be aware that any some or none of the side-effects may not be mentioned here, wether they be harmful or beneficial to health.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names

An eminent Theri of Ceylon who kept the dhutangas. Dpv.xviii.15.

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Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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Biology (plants and animals)

Source: Google Books: CRC World Dictionary (Regional names)

Mahila in India is the name of a plant defined with Amomum subulatum in various botanical sources. This page contains potential references in Ayurveda, modern medicine, and other folk traditions or local practices It has the synonym Cardamomum subulatum Kuntze (among others).

Example references for further research on medicinal uses or toxicity (see latin names for full list):

· Notes from the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh (1972)
· Revisio Generum Plantarum (1891)
· Flora Indica, or ‘Descriptions of Indian Plants’ (1820)

If you are looking for specific details regarding Mahila, for example chemical composition, diet and recipes, side effects, extract dosage, pregnancy safety, health benefits, have a look at these references.

Biology book cover
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This sections includes definitions from the five kingdoms of living things: Animals, Plants, Fungi, Protists and Monera. It will include both the official binomial nomenclature (scientific names usually in Latin) as well as regional spellings and variants.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

mahilā : (f.) a woman.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Mahilā, (f.) (*Sk. mahilā) woman, female Vin. II, 281 (°titthe at the women’s bathing place); J. I, 188; Dpvs IX. 4; ThA. 271. (Page 527)

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

mahilā (महिला).—f S (Poetry.) A woman, esp. a wife. 2 The female of a beast.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

mahilā (महिला).—f A woman, esp. a wife.

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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Mahilā (महिला).—[mah-ilac Uṇādi-sūtra 1.54]

1) A woman; तवैतद्वक्षोजद्वितयमरविन्दाक्षमहिले (tavaitadvakṣojadvitayamaravindākṣamahile) Lakṣmīlaharī S.22.

2) An amorous or intoxicated woman; विरहेण विकलहृदया निर्जलमीनायते महिला (viraheṇa vikalahṛdayā nirjalamīnāyate mahilā) Bv.2.68.

3) The creeper called Priyaṅgu.

4) A kind of perfume of fragrant plant (reṇukā).

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Mahīlā (महीला).—A woman, female; चारु चचार सरःसु विराजत् काकलिका कलहंसमहेला (cāru cacāra saraḥsu virājat kākalikā kalahaṃsamahelā) Rām. Ch.4.98. 1

See also (synonyms): mahelā, mahelikā.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mahilā (महिला).—f.

(-lā) 1. A woman, a female. 2. A woman literally or figuratively intoxicated. 3. A plant bearing a fragrant seed, commonly Priyangu. 4. A perfume commonly Renuka. E. mah to worship or be worshipped, Unadi aff. ilac; also mahalā and mahelā .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mahilā (महिला).—f. 1. A woman, [Hitopadeśa] iv. [distich] 54. 2. A plant = priyaṅgu.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mahilā (महिला).—[feminine] woman, wife.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Mahilā (महिला):—f. ([according to] to [Uṇādi-sūtra i, 55] [from] √1. mah) a woman, female, [Hitopadeśa; Sāhitya-darpaṇa] (cf. mahelā)

2) a woman literally or figuratively intoxicated, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) a [particular] fragrant drug, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.] (= priyaṅgu, [Bhāvaprakāśa])

4) Name of a river, [Siṃhāsana-dvātriṃśikā or vikramāditya-caritra, jaina recension]

5) Mahīlā (महीला):—[from mahilā] f. a woman, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mahilā (महिला):—(lā) 1. f. A woman; one intoxicated; plant Priyangu.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Mahilā (महिला) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Mahilā, Mahiliyā.

[Sanskrit to German]

Mahila in German

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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Mahilā (महिला):—(nf) a lady.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Mahilā (महिला) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Mahilā.

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Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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