Lokaloka, aka: Loka-aloka, Lokāloka; 3 Definition(s)

Introduction

Lokaloka means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Śāktism (Śākta philosophy)

Lokāloka (लोकालोक):—There is a land, all of pure gold (beyond this ocean of pure water) for a space equal to the distance between Mānasottara and Meru. This land is like a mirror; there are no beings here; the reason is, any substance placed on it would at once be converted into gold and nothing can be obtained out of it. No living beings can live there and therefore it is named Lokāloka. This is established always between the Loka and Aloka. The God himself has made this as the boundary of the three Lokas. The rays of the Sun, the Polar Star and all the planets are confined to this sphere; rather passing through its middle, the luminaries shed their lustre on the three Lokas.

Beyond the mountain Lokāloka, is said to lie the pure path leading to Yogeśvara within the egg-shaped ellipsoid formed by the Heaven and Earth. The inner dimension of this ellipsoid is twenty five Koṭi Yoyanas. When this egg becomes unconscious (lifeless), the Sun enters within it in the form of Vairāja. Hence the Sun is called Mārtaṇḍa. He is Hiraṇyagarbha, when He is born from this Golden Egg. (See the Śrīmad-devī-bhāgavatam 8.14)

(Source): Sacred Texts: The Shrimad Devi Bhagawatam
Śāktism book cover
context information

Śākta (शाक्त, shakta) or Śāktism (shaktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devī) is revered and worshipped. Śākta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

Purāṇa

1a) Lokāloka (लोकालोक).—The mountain forming the boundary of the earth.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa I. 1. 78; 3. 31; Vāyu-purāṇa 49. 144; 50. 155, 160, 205; 101. 191-2.

1b) (Mt.) a chain of hills beyond the Svādūdaka, between the Loka where the sun shines and Aloka where he does not. The regions lighted by the sun are said to cover 50 crores of yojanas. The chain of the Lokāloka is said to occupy a fourth of the area of the globe. In the Aloka Yogeśvara-Kṛṣṇa travels.1 Crossed by Arjuna and Kṛṣṇa on their way to Vaikuṇṭha in search of the dead child of the Brāhmaṇa of Dvārakā.2 A. mythical mountainous belt in the south separating the visible world from the world of darkness.3 10,000 yojanas in height and breadth; protected by four guardians, Sudhāman and others on the four directions.4

  • 1) Bhāgavata-purāṇa V. 20. 34-42; Matsya-purāṇa 123. 47; 124. 38, 81.
  • 2) Bhāgavata-purāṇa X. 89. 48.
  • 3) Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 15. 3; 19. 150; 21. 51, 101 and 106, 155; III. 7. 294; IV. 2. 194.
  • 4) Viṣṇu-purāṇa II. 4. 94; 8. 82-3.
(Source): Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purāṇa book cover
context information

The Purāṇas (पुराण, purana) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahāpurāṇas total over 400,000 ślokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

lōkālōka (लोकालोक).—m S A mountainous belt surrounding the outermost of the seven seas and bounding the world.

(Source): DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

Relevant definitions

Search found 356 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Loka
lōka (लोक).—m People. In comp. A class, an order, a body. Ex. gavaīlōka, śipāīlōka. The world; ...
Lokapala
Lokapāla (लोकपाल) refers to a set of ten deities, the worship of whom forms part of the rituals...
Brahmaloka
brahmalōka (ब्रह्मलोक).—m (S) The heaven of Brahma.
Aloka
Āloka (आलोक, “light”) refers to one of the “twenty form objects” (rūpa) as defined in the Dharm...
Madhyaloka
Madhyaloka (मध्यलोक).—according to the 2nd-century Tattvārthasūtra 3.7, what constitute the mid...
Manushyaloka
Manuṣyaloka (मनुष्यलोक) refers to the region where human beings can exist.—The human beings are...
Pitriloka
pitṛlōka (पितृलोक).—m (S) The region or heaven (according to some, the orbit of the moon) inhab...
Triloka
Triloka (त्रिलोक).—Progress of, depends on the sun without which there would be no reckon...
Vishnuloka
viṣṇulōka (विष्णुलोक).—m The heaven of viṣṇu, or vaikuṇṭha.
Ihaloka
Ihaloka (इहलोक) or Ihalokabhaya refers to “fear of this world” and represents one of the seven ...
Paraloka
Paraloka (परलोक) or Paralokabhaya refers to “fear of the next world” and represents one of the ...
Janaloka
janalōka (जनलोक).—m Everybody.
Lokapura
Lokāpura.—Chanda in the Central Provinces. It containend the temples of Mahākāli and her son Ac...
Satyaloka
satyalōka (सत्यलोक).—m (S) The uppermost of the seven lokas or worlds,--the heaven of truth, of...
Urdhvaloka
ūrdhvalōka (ऊर्ध्वलोक).—m The world above, the heavens, the svarga.

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