Jhankara, Jhaṅkāra, Jhaṃkāra, Jhamkara, Jhamkara: 17 definitions

Introduction:

Jhankara means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Wisdom Library: Local Names of Plants and Drugs

Jhankara [झंकारा] in the Marathi language is the name of a plant identified with Haplanthodes verticillatus (Roxb.) R.B.Majumdar from the Acanthaceae (Acanthus) family. For the possible medicinal usage of jhankara, you can check this page for potential sources and references, although be aware that any some or none of the side-effects may not be mentioned here, wether they be harmful or beneficial to health.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Jhankara in Purana glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Skanda-purana

Jhaṅkāra (झङ्कार) refers to the “humming sounds (of bees)”, according to the Skandapurāṇa 2.2.13 (“The Greatness of Kapoteśa and Bilveśvara”).—Accordingly: as Jaimini said to the Sages: “[...] [Dhūrjaṭi (Śiva)] went to the holy spot Kuśasthalī. He performed a very severe penance near Nīla mountain. [...] By the power of his penance that holy spot became one comparable to Vṛndāvana, the forest near Gokula. Its interior was rendered splendid by lakes, ponds, reservoirs and rivers. It was full of different kinds of trees and creepers (laden) with fruits and flowers of all seasons. It was resonant with the humming sounds [i.e., jhaṅkāra] of bees inebriated with honey. It was full of different kinds of flocks of birds. It was a comfortable place of resort for all creatures. Since by means of his penance Śiva became (small) like a dove, he came to be called Kapoteśvara at the behest of Murāri (Viṣṇu). It is at his bidding that the Three-eyed Lord always stays here along with Mṛḍānī (Pārvatī). [...]”.

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Jhaṅkāra (झङ्कार) is the name of a musical instrument, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.40 (“The Marriage Procession of Śiva”).—Accordingly, as Brahmā narrated to Nārada: “[...] The loud sounds of Ḍamarus, the Jhaṅkāra sound of the Bherīs and the sound of the conches pervaded all the three worlds. The tumultuous sound of the Dundubhis rose up in the air blessing the universe auspiciously and destroying everything other than auspicious. O sage, behind the Gaṇas, the enthusiastic gods, the Siddhas, the guardians of the quarters and others followed. [...]”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

jhaṅkāra (झंकार).—m (S Imit.) Jingling, clinking, clanking &c. (as of the bells of dancers, of tabors &c.)

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jhāṅkara (झांकर).—n A dense bush or shrub. 2 A dense or close part of a tree. Ex. vānara āmbyācē jhāṅkarānta jāūna lapūna basalā āhē. 3 A branch of thick foliage cut off.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

jhaṅkāra (झंकार).—m Jingling, clinking, clanking &c.

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jhāṅkara (झांकर).—n A dense bush or shrub. A dense or close part of a tree.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Jhaṅkāra (झङ्कार).—A low murmuring sound, as the buzzing of bees; (ayaṃ) दिगन्तानातेने मधुपकुलझङ्कारभरितान् (digantānātene madhupakulajhaṅkārabharitān) Bv.1.33;4.29; Bhartṛhari 1.9; Amaruśataka 48; Pañcatantra (Bombay) 5.53.

Derivable forms: jhaṅkāraḥ (झङ्कारः).

See also (synonyms): jhaṅkṛta.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Jhaṅkāra (झङ्कार).—m.

(-raḥ) A low inarticulate sound, as the buzzing of bees, &c. E. jha, and kāra a making. kṛ-ghañ .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Jhaṃkāra (झंकार).—i. e. jham, an imitative sound, -kāra, m. Humming, [Bhāgavata-Purāṇa, (ed. Burnouf.)] 8, 8, 43.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Jhaṃkāra (झंकार).—[masculine] clattering, murmuring, noise.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Jhāṃkāra (झांकार):—[=jhāṃ-kāra] [from jhāṃ > jhaṣa] m. a low murmuring (of kettle-drums), [Alaṃkāratilaka],

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Jhaṅkāra (झङ्कार):—(raḥ) 1. m. Buzzing.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Jhaṅkāra (झङ्कार) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Jhaṃkāra.

[Sanskrit to German]

Jhankara in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Jhankara in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Jhaṃkāra (झंकार) [Also spelled jhankar]:—(nf) tinkling, jingling; clinking sound; chirr.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Jhaṃkāra (झंकार) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Jhaṅkāra.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Jhaṃkāra (ಝಂಕಾರ):—[noun] the humming sound of bees.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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