Jhanjha, Jhañjhā, Jhamjha: 15 definitions

Introduction:

Jhanjha means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

Jhañjhā (झञ्झा) refers to a musical instrument, first mentioned in Nāṭyaśāstra 4.253, after Śiva danced using Recakas and Aṅgahāras, and Pārvatī performed a ‘gentle dance’. Jhañjhā refers to “large cymbols”.

Natyashastra book cover
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Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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India history and geography

Source: Wikipedia: India History

Jhanjha was Shilahara ruler of north Konkan branch from 910 CE – 930 CE. Vappuvanna was followed by Jhanjha . He is mentioned by Al-Masudi as ruling over Samur (i.e., Chaul in the Kolaba district) in 916 CE. He was a very devout Shaiva. He is said to have built twelve temples of Shiva and named them after himself.

Source: What is India: Inscriptions of the Śilāhāras

Jhañjha (झञ्झ) is the name of king from the Śīlāra dynasty mentioned in the “Prince of Wales museum plates of Chadvaideva”.—Accordingly, “From Vappuvana was (born) Jhañjha, who is constantly praised throughout the world, being endowed with all multitudes of merits. He, like Indra, became well known on account of his military qualities. His younger brother was the victorious king Goggi, who was known as second Jhañjha”.

These copper plates (mentioning Jhañjha) were in the collection of George Da Gunha and was purchased by the Trustees of the Prince of Wales Museum, Bombay, in 1919. The inscription refers itself to the reign of the Śīlāra (i.e. Śilāhāra) Mahāsāmanta Chadvaideva of North Koṅkaṇ. The object of it is to record that Chadvaideva executed the grant which had been made by Vajjaḍadeva, the son of Goggi, who, as shown below, was Chadvaideva’s elder brother and predecessor on the throne.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as mythology, zoology, royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

jhāñjha (झांझ).—See jhāñja &c.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Jhañjhā (झञ्झा).—

1) The noise of the wind or of falling rain.

2) Wind and rain, hurricane, gale.

3) A clanking sound, jingling.

4) Raining in large drops.

5) Anything lost.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Jhañjhā (झञ्झा).—f.

(-ñjhā) 1. Wind, wind and rain, a hurricane, a gale. 2. A sharp clanging sound, jangling. 3. Raining in large drops. 4. A stary, any thing lost. jhamiti kṛtvā jhaṭati jhaṭa-ḍa .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Jhañjhā (झञ्झा).—i. e. probably a reduplicated form of jham (cf. jhaṃkāra), f. A sharp clanging sound, Amar, 48.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Jhañjhā (झञ्झा).—[feminine] roaring (of the wind etc.).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Jhañjhā (झञ्झा):—[from jhaṅ] f. the noise of the wind or of falling rain, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

2) [v.s. ...] wind and rain, hurricane, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) [v.s. ...] raining in large drops, [Horace H. Wilson]

4) [v.s. ...] a stray, [Horace H. Wilson]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Jhañjhā (झञ्झा):—(ñjhā) 1. f. Wind, a hurricane; a clanging; heavy rain; thing lost.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Jhaṃjha (झंझ) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Jhaṃjha.

[Sanskrit to German]

Jhanjha in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Jhanjha in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Jhanjha in Hindi refers in English to:—(nm) a gale, storm; ~[vata] (nm) see [jhamjha]..—jhanjha (झंझा) is alternatively transliterated as Jhaṃjhā.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

1) Jhaṃjha (झंझ) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Jhaṃjha.

2) Jhaṃjhā (झंझा) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Jhañjhā.

3) Jhaṃjhā (झंझा) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Jhañjhā.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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