Jatapatha, aka: Jaṭapāṭha, Jata-patha, Jaṭāpāṭha; 2 Definition(s)

Introduction

Jatapatha means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Jatapatha in Purana glossary... « previous · [J] · next »

Jaṭāpāṭha (जटापाठ).—See under Ghanapāṭha.

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopaedia
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Jatapatha in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [J] · next »

Jaṭapāṭha (जटपाठ).—the Jaṭā arrangement of a Vedic text.

Derivable forms: jaṭapāṭhaḥ (जटपाठः).

Jaṭapāṭha is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms jaṭa and pāṭha (पाठ).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 739 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Patha
Patha (पथ).—nt. (in Sanskrit m.), way: marutpathāni LV 117.9 (verse). See also Laṅkā-patha.--- ...
Jata
Jaṭa refers to “hairlock” which was popularly used in dance, as mentioned in the Cilappatikāram...
Sujata
1) Sujāta (सुजात).—One of the hundred sons of Dhṛtarāṣṭra. He attacked Bhīmasena in the battle ...
Dakshinapatha
Dakṣiṇāpatha (दक्षिणापथ).—n. (-thaṃ) 1. The south. 2. Southern road or course. 3. Deccan. E. da...
Iryapatha
Īryapatha (ईर्यपथ).—1) the observances of a religious mendicant to obtain knowledge. 2) the fou...
Kupatha
Kupatha (कुपथ) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. I.59.25, I.65) and represents one o...
Jatakarma
Jatakarma refers to one of those ceremonies of the Nambutiris performed after marriage, during ...
Sadyojata
Sadyojāta (सद्योजात).—m. (-taḥ) A calf. E. sadyas in a moment, and jāta born.
Uttarapatha
Uttarāpatha refers to “northern India”: a district of ancient India comprising the Punjab prope...
Sahajati
Sahajāti (सहजाति) was an important town of ancient Cedi: one of the sixteen Mahājanapadas of th...
Trijata
1) Trijaṭa (त्रिजट).—(GĀRGYA). A sage. Though he was a sage he lived by farming. He had a wife ...
Jatadhara
Jaṭādhara (जटाधर).—m. (-raḥ) 1. A name of Siva. 2. A Jina or Jaina deified saint. 3. Any mendic...
Jatarupa
Jātarūpa (जातरूप).—mfn. (-paḥ-pī-paṃ) Embodied, assuming shape or form. n. (-paṃ) Gold. E. jāta...
Supatha
Supatha (सुपथ).—m. (-thaḥ) 1. A good road. 2. Good conduct. 3. Good course. E. su good, pathin ...
Mahapatha
Mahāpatha (महापथ).—m. (-thaḥ) 1. The principal path or entrance to a town or house. &c., a ...

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