Ambikeya, Aṃbikeya, Āmbikeya: 5 definitions

Introduction

Ambikeya means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous (A) next»] — Ambikeya in Purana glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Varāha-purāṇa

Āmbikeya (आम्बिकेय).—One of the seven major mountains in Śākadvīpa, according to the Varāhapurāṇa chapter 86. It is also known by the name Vibhrājasa. Śākadvīpa is one of the seven islands (dvīpa), ruled over by Medhātithi, one of the ten sons of Priyavrata, son of Svāyambhuva Manu, who was created by Brahmā, who was in turn created by Nārāyaṇa, the unknowable all-pervasive primordial being.

The Varāhapurāṇa is categorised as a Mahāpurāṇa, and was originally composed of 24,000 metrical verses, possibly originating from before the 10th century. It is composed of two parts and Sūta is the main narrator.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1) Aṃbikeya (अंबिकेय).—A hill-citadel of Śākadvīpa.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 19. 89.

2a) Āmbikeya (आम्बिकेय).—A place where Hiraṇyākṣa was slain by Vārāha Hari.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 122. 16.

2b) A hill of the Śākadvīpam.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 49. 84; Viṣṇu-purāṇa II. 4. 62.
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Ambikeya (अम्बिकेय).—Name of Gaṇeśa, Kārttikeya or Dhṛtarāṣṭra; प्रज्ञाचक्षुस्तप्यमानोऽम्बिकेयः (prajñācakṣustapyamāno'mbikeyaḥ) Mb.3.4.1; more correctly written आम्बिकेय (āmbikeya) q. v.

Derivable forms: ambikeyaḥ (अम्बिकेयः).

See also (synonyms): ambikeyaka.

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Āmbikeya (आम्बिकेय).—[ambikāyā apatyaṃ ḍhak] An epithet of (a) Dhṛtarāṣṭra; न मे तच्च श्रुतवानाम्बिकेयः (na me tacca śrutavānāmbikeyaḥ) Mb.3.5.14. (b) Kārtikeya.

Derivable forms: āmbikeyaḥ (आम्बिकेयः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ambikeya (अम्बिकेय).—m.

(-yaḥ) 1. Ganesa or Kartikeya both sons of Parvati. 2. A name of D'Hritarashtra. E. ambikā as above; and ḍhak affix, implying family decent.

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Āmbikeya (आम्बिकेय).—m.

(-yaḥ) 1. A name of Dhritarashtra. 2. Also of Kar- Tikeya. E. ambikā the mother of Dhritarashtra or a name of Durga and ḍhak aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Ambikeya (अम्बिकेय):—[from ambā] m. (for āmbikeya q.v.) Name of Dhṛtarāṣṭra, [Mahābhārata iii, 219 and 250]

2) [v.s. ...] of Gaṇeśa, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) [v.s. ...] of Kārttikeya, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) Āmbikeya (आम्बिकेय):—m. ([gana] śubhrādi, [Pāṇini 4-1, 123]), a descendant of Ambikā

5) Name of Dhṛta-rāṣṭra, [Mahābhārata]

6) of Kārttikeya, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) of a mountain, [Viṣṇu-purāṇa ii, 4, 63.]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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