Tapi, aka: Tāpī; 11 Definition(s)

Introduction

Tapi means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Tāpī (तापी).—Name of a river originating from Vindhya, a holy mountain (kulaparvata) in Bhārata, according to the Varāhapurāṇa chapter 85. There are settlements (janapada) where Āryas and Mlecchas dwell who drink water from these rivers.

Bhārata is a region south of Hemādri, once ruled over by Bharata (son of Ṛṣabha), whose ancestral lineage can be traced back to Svāyambhuva Manu, who was created by Brahmā, who was in turn created by Nārāyaṇa, the unknowable all-pervasive primordial being.

The Varāhapurāṇa is categorised as a Mahāpurāṇa, and was originally composed of 24,000 metrical verses, possibly originating from before the 10th century. It is composed of two parts and Sūta is the main narrator.

Source: Wisdom Library: Varāha-purāṇa

1a) Tāpī (तापी).—A river in Bhāratavarṣa rising in the Vindhyas;1 visited by Balarāma.2

  • 1) Bhāgavata-purāṇa V. 19. 18; Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 16. 32; Matsya-purāṇa 114. 27.
  • 2) Vāyu-purāṇa 45. 102; Bhāgavata-purāṇa X. 79. 20.

1b) A R. rises from the Ṛkṣa hill.*

  • * Viṣṇu-purāṇa II. 3. 11.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Katha (narrative stories)

Tāpī (तापी) is the name of a river, mentioned as flowing ten yojanas away from Nandāvaṭa of the Ābhīra country, according to the Udayasundarīkathā. It is here that a gardener named Vasantaśīla chased the parrot Citraśikha whom he heard reciting a stanza after flying out of a Buddhist temple.

The Udayasundarīkathā is a Sanskrit epic tale written by Soḍḍhala in the early 11th century, revolving around the Nāga princess Udayasundarī and Malayavāhana (king of Pratiṣṭhāna).

Source: Wisdomlib Libary: Kathā

Tāpī (तापी).—One of the four rivers if India mentioned by Soḍḍhala.—The river Tāpī has its source from the Vindhyapādas i.e. Sātpurā range and falls into the Arabian Sea near Surat. It is said to be the daughter of the sun, (Bhānumataḥ sutā,) still the water of the river consists of the coolness of the moon. It is, at a distance of ten yojanas from Nandāvaṭapura

Source: Shodhganga: A critical appreciation of soddhalas udayasundarikatha
Katha book cover
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Katha (कथा, kathā) refers to narrative Sanskrit literature often inspired from epic legendry (itihasa) and poetry (mahākāvya). Some Kathas reflect socio-political instructions for the King while others remind the reader of important historical event and exploits of the Gods, Heroes and Sages.

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Kavya (poetry)

Tāpī (तापी) is the name a locality mentioned in Rājaśekhara’s 10th-century Kāvyamīmāṃsā.—Tāpī or Tāpatī is a river, which is rises from the Vindhyas and falls into the Arabian Sea near Surat.

Source: Shodhganga: The Kavyamimamsa of Rajasekhara
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Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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India history and geogprahy

Tāpī (तापी) is the name of a river mentioned in two similair inscriptions sponsored by Uṣavadāta, the son-in-law of Nahapāna. According to the inscription, Uṣavadāta established free crossings at rivers such as Tāpī. He also established public watering-stations on both banks of these rivers. The first inscription is found at Karle (ancient Valūraka) and the other on the wall of a rock-cut cave at Nasik.

The Kṣaharātas called themselves kṣatrapas (originally referring to military governors of the Achaemenid empire) and established a small kingdom in modern Gujarat. In the middle of the first century, a ruler named Kṣaharāta Kṣatrapa Nahapāna obtained several Sātavāhana establishments which were later recaptured by Gautamīputra Śrī Sātakarṇi.

Source: Wisdom Library: India History

Tāpī (तापी) is the name of a river found in India.—It is known as Tāptī now-a-days, near Surat in Gujarat.

Source: archive.org: Geography in Ancient Indian inscriptions
India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

tapi : (aor. of tapati) shined.

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary
Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

tapī (तपी).—a (tapa) That is engaged wholly in the exercises of devotion and mortification.

--- OR ---

tāpī (तापी).—f The river Tapi at Surat.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

tapī (तपी).—a That is engaged wholly in tapa.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Tāpī (तापी).—

1) Name of the river Tāptī, which joins the sea near Surat.

2) The river Yamunā.

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 12 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Tapana
Tapana.—(IE 7-1-2), ‘three’ with reference to Agni; but ‘twelve’ with reference to ‘the sun’. N...
Vindhya
Vindhya (विन्ध्य) is a range of mountains which stretches across India and divides Madhyadeśa o...
Payoshni
Payoṣṇī (पयोष्णी).—A holy river. This river starts from the Vindhya mountains and flows to the ...
Lakulisha
Lakulīśa (लकुलीश) is the name of Śiva he assumes in this Kali age.—According to a copper-plate ...
Gopati
Gopati (गोपति) is the name of a deity who received the Cintyāgama from Sudīpta through the mahā...
Nandavata
nāndavaṭa (नांदवट).—f Dwelling, residing. The crown of the head.
Kho
khō (खो).—m The sound which, in boys' play, the boy who wants to sit utters to another (sitting...
Ajnatavin
Ājñātāvin (आज्ञाताविन्).—adj. (= Pali aññātāvi-n; § 22.51), posses- sed of perfect knowledge: U...
Samvaraka
Saṃvaraka (संवरक) is the name of a ploughmen living near the river Tāpī, according to the ...
Kurutu
Kuruṭu (कुरुटु).—nt., and kuruṭāvi (vv.ll. °ṭuvi, °tāvi, °ṭāpi), nt., two large numbers or ways...
Ushavadata
Uṣavadāta (उषवदात).—The king Uṣavadāta is said to have made gifts of Cows, gold, money and Tirt...
Nimil
Nimīl (निमील्).—1 P.1) To shut the eyes; यदा स्वपिति शान्तात्मा तदा सर्वं निमीलति (yadā svapiti...

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