Pampa, Pampā: 14 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Pampa means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Pump.

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In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Pampā (पम्पा) is the name of a sacred river as mentioned in the Śivapurāṇa 1.12, “somehow men must strive to find a residence in a holy centre. On the shores of the ocean in the confluence of hundreds of rivers there are many such holy centres (puṇyakṣetra or tīrtha) and temples. [...] By residing on the banks of the auspicious rivers Sarasvatī, Pampā, Kanyā and Śvetanadī one shall attain Indraloka”.

Note: Pampā is a tributary of Tuṅgabhadrā river.

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Pampā (पम्पा).—A pond near Ṛṣyamūkācala. Sugrīva used to stay near this pond. (Chapter 279, Vana Parva).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1a) Pampā (पम्पा).—A river sacred to Hari; visited by Balarāma.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa VII. 14. 31; X. 79. 12.

1b) A R. of the Bhadra country.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 43. 27.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Kavya (poetry)

Source: Wisdom Library: Kathāsaritsāgara

Pampā (पम्पा) is the name of a lake (sara / saras) near the Ṛṣyamūka mountain, as mentionedin the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 107. Accordingly, “... and on the banks of the sanctifying Pampā lake near that mountain [Ṛṣyamūka] he [Naravāhanadatta] ate fruits and roots of heavenly flavour, and he drank the holy water of the lake, which was rendered delicious and fragrant by the fruits dropped from trees on its banks, as a relish to his meal of deer’s flesh”.

The Kathāsaritsāgara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Pampā, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravāhanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyādharas (celestial beings). The work is said to have been an adaptation of Guṇāḍhya’s Bṛhatkathā consisting of 100,000 verses, which in turn is part of a larger work containing 700,000 verses.

context information

Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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India history and geography

Source: archive.org: Chaitanya’s life and teachings (history)

Pampa is one of the places visited by Chaitanya during his pilgrimage in Southern India between April 1510 and January 1512.—Pampa.—The ancient and Puranic name of the Tungabhadra. The village of Hampi (the site of the famous capital Vijaynagar) was originally known as Pampa-tirtha. This name (also Pampa-saras) is now borne by a tank on the Haidarabad side of the Tungabhadra near Anegundi. (Bellary Gazetteer, 6, 261).

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Pampā (पम्पा).—

1) Name of a lake in the Daṇḍakā forest; इदं च पम्पाभिधानं सरः (idaṃ ca pampābhidhānaṃ saraḥ) U.1; R.13.3; Bk.6.73.

2) Name of a river in the south of India.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Pampā (पम्पा).—f.

(-mpā) 1. The name of a river, in the south of India. 2. Name of a lake in the Dandaka forest. E. to drink, pa Unadi aff., man inserted, and the radical vowel made short.

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Pāmpa (पाम्प).—mfn.

(-mpaḥ-mpī-mpaṃ) Belonging to the river, (Pampa.) E. pampā, and aṇ aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Pampā (पम्पा).—f. The name of a river.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Pampā (पम्पा).—[feminine] [Name] of a river and a lake.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Pampā (पम्पा):—f. (√1. ? [Uṇādi-sūtra iii, 28. [Scholiast or Commentator]]) Name of a river in the south of India, [Mahābhārata; Rāmāyaṇa] etc.

2) of a lake, [Raghuvaṃśa [Scholiast or Commentator]]

3) Pāmpa (पाम्प):—mf(ī)n. belonging to or situated on the river Pampā, [Bhaṭṭi-kāvya] (also pana, [Monier-Williams’ Sanskrit-English Dictionary]).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Pampā (पम्पा):—(mpā) 1. f. River in Orissa.

2) Pāmpa (पाम्प):—[(mpaḥ-mpī-mpaṃ) a.] Of or belonging to the Pampā river.

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Böhtlingk and Roth Grosses Petersburger Wörterbuch

Pampā (पम्पा):—f. Nomen proprium eines Flusses (im Süden) [UJJVAL.] zu [Uṇādisūtra 3, 28.] [Lassen’s Indische Alterthumskunde I, 568,] [Nalopākhyāna] [Mahābhārata 3, 16088. 13, 4889.] [Rāmāyaṇa 1, 1, 57. 3, 10, 18. 60, 3. fg. 6, 82, 106. 108, 29.] [Raghuvaṃśa 13, 30] (nach dem [Scholiast] ein Sees). [Bhāgavatapurāṇa 7, 14, 31.] [MAHĀVĪRAC. 85, 1.] [Bhaṭṭikavya 6, 73.] Nomen proprium eines Sees: pampābhidhaṃ saraḥ [Rājataraṅgiṇī 7, 941.] Nach dem gaṇa varaṇādi zu [Pāṇini’s acht Bücher 4, 2, 82] hat pampā auch eine Bedeutung, die ergentlich einem Derivat davon zukäme.

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Pāmpa (पाम्प):—adj. an der Pampā gelegen: vanāni [Bhaṭṭikavya 6, 72.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Sanskrit-Wörterbuch in kürzerer Fassung

Pampā (पम्पा):—f. Nomen proprium eines Flusses und eines Sees.

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Pāmpa (पाम्प):—Adj. an der Pampā gelegen.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Paṃpa (पंप) [Also spelled pump]:—(nm) a pump; a kind of shoe.

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