Nikara, Nikāra, Nīkāra: 19 definitions

Introduction:

Nikara means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Nikar.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Nikara (निकर).—A Rākṣasa clan, like the Bhadrakas.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 69. 189.
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

Source: Wisdom Library: Brihat Samhita by Varahamihira

Nikara (निकर) refers to an “abundance” (of rain), according to the Bṛhatsaṃhitā (chapter 9), an encyclopedic Sanskrit work written by Varāhamihira mainly focusing on the science of ancient Indian astronomy astronomy (Jyotiṣa).—Accordingly, “If Venus should enter the constellation of Mṛgaśīrṣa, juice and crops will suffer; if she should enter the constellation of Ārdrā, the people of Kośala and of Kaliṅga will suffer and there will be abundance of rain [i.e., salila-nikara-kara]. If Venus should enter the constellation of Punarvasu, the people of Aśmaka and of Vidarbha will become lawless. If Venus should enter the constellation of Puṣya, there will be good rain; singing and dancing parties will suffer”.

Jyotisha book cover
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Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: OSU Press: Cakrasamvara Samadhi

Nikara (निकर) refers to “essence”, according to the Cakrasaṃvara Samādhi [i.e., Cakrasamvara Meditation] ritual often performed in combination with the Cakrasaṃvara Samādhi, which refers to the primary pūjā and sādhanā practice of Newah Mahāyāna-Vajrayāna Buddhists in Nepal.—Accordingly, “A red twilight, producing a sharp essence (khara-kara-nikarā), an edge as bright as seven suns, A knife killing all enemies, a gleaming immortal striker held by the right arm”.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Nikara.—(EI 12, 33), cf. yathādīyamāna-bhoga-bhāga-kara- nikara-ādikam; a small tax or cess; small amount of rent fixed for a gift land; practically the same as kara or tax (IHQ, Vol. XXXIV, p. 279). Cf. upakara, tṛṇodaka, mānya-kaṇikĕ, etc. Note: nikara is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as mythology, zoology, royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

nikara : (m.) multitude.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Nikara, (Sk. nikara, ni+karoti) a multitude Dāvs. V, 25 (jātipuppha°). (Page 351)

— or —

Nikāra, (Sk. nikāra in diff. meaning, ni+kāra) service, humility J. III, 120 (nikāra-pakāra, prob. to be read nipaccākāra, q. v.). (Page 352)

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

nikara (निकर).—m prep. nikara f m Excess or exces- siveness; blind determinedness of purpose or action; vehemence worked up. Ex. of use nikarāsa or nikarāvara yēṇēṃ-jāṇēṃ- āṇaṇēṃ-ghālaṇēṃ.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Nikara (निकर).—[nikṝ bhāvādau ap]

1) A heap, pile.

2) A flock, multitude, collection; पपात स्वेदाम्बुप्रसर इव हर्षाश्रुनिकरः (papāta svedāmbuprasara iva harṣāśrunikaraḥ) Gīt. 11;Śiśupālavadha 4.58; Ṛtusaṃhāra 6.18.

3) A bundle.

4) Sap, pith, essence.

5) A suitable gift, honorarium.

6) A treasure.

Derivable forms: nikaraḥ (निकरः).

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Nikāra (निकार).—&c. See under निकृ (nikṛ).

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Nikāra (निकार).—

1) Winnowing corn.

2) Lifting up.

3) Killing, slaughter.

4) Humiliation, subjugation.

5) Insult, injury, wrong, offence; तीर्णो निकारार्णवः (tīrṇo nikārārṇavaḥ) Ve.6.43; Mv. 3.41;5.14;7.8; Kirātārjunīya 1.43;3.44.

6) Abuse, reproach, disrespect.

7) Wickedness, malice; अलमङ्ग निकारोऽयम् (alamaṅga nikāro'yam) Mahābhārata (Bombay) 5.129.47.

8) Opposition, contradiction.

Derivable forms: nikāraḥ (निकारः).

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Nīkāra (नीकार).—See निकार (nikāra).

Derivable forms: nīkāraḥ (नीकारः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nikara (निकर).—m.

(-raḥ) 1. A flock or multitude. 2. A heap, a bundle. 3. Pith, sap, essence. 4. Suitable or proper gift. 5. A treasure, especially belonging to Kuvera: see nidhi. E. ni in or upon, kṝ to throw, affix ap .

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Nikāra (निकार).—m.

(-raḥ) 1. Opposition, contradiction. 2. Injury, wrong, offence. 3. wickedness; malice. 4. Abuse, reproach, disrespect. 5. Raising, tossing or lifting up. 6. Piling or winnowing corn. 7. Killing. E. ni depreciative prefix, kṛ to make, or kṝ to throw, affix bhāve ghañ or ap.

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Nīkāra (नीकार).—m.

(-raḥ) Disrespect, contempt, vilifying, degrading. E. ni before, kṛ to make, aff. bhāve ghañ .

Nīkāra can also be spelled as Nikāra (निकार).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nikara (निकर).—i. e. ni-kṛ10 + a, m. A flock or multitude, [Gītagovinda. ed. Lassen.] 11, 4; Mahābhārata 15, 722.

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Nikāra (निकार).—i. e. ni-kṛ + a, m. 1. Humiliation, Mahābhārata 1, 7081. 2. Abuse, 14, 1788.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nikara (निकर).—[masculine] heap, pile, mass, abundance, multitude (often —°).

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Nikāra (निकार).—[masculine] humiliation, insult.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Nikara (निकर):—[=ni-kara] m. (√kṛ) a heap, pile, a flock or multitude, a bundle, mass, collection (mfn. ifc. f(ā). ), [Mahābhārata; Kāvya literature] etc.

2) [v.s. ...] ([cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]) pith, sap, essence

3) [v.s. ...] suitable gift, a honorarium

4) [v.s. ...] a treasure, the best of anything, a treasure belonging to Kubera, 1.

5) Nikāra (निकार):—[from ni-kara] a m. ([cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]) piling up or winnowing corn

6) [v.s. ...] tossing or lifting up.

7) [=ni-kāra] b 1. and 2. ni-kāra, raṇa, etc. See under ni-kara and ni-kṛ.

8) [=ni-kāra] [from ni-kṛ] c m. bringing down, humiliation, wrong, offence, injury, [Mahābhārata; Kāvya literature] etc.

9) [v.s. ...] wickedness, malice, [Horace H. Wilson]

10) [v.s. ...] opposition, contradiction, [Horace H. Wilson]

11) [v.s. ...] = next, [Demetrius Galanos’s Lexiko: sanskritikes, anglikes, hellenikes]

12) Nīkāra (नीकार):—[=nī-kāra] [from ] m. (√1. kṝ) disrespect, contempt, degradation, [Harṣacarita]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Nikara (निकर):—(raḥ) 1. m. A flock or multitude; pith; a proper gift; a treasure.

2) Nikāra (निकार):—[ni-kāra] (raḥ) 1. m. Opposition; injury; wickedness; abuse; winnowing or piling corn.

3) Nīkāra (नीकार):—[nī-kāra] (raḥ) 1. m. Vilifying.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Nikara (निकर) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Ṇiara, Ṇikara, Ṇigara.

[Sanskrit to German]

Nikara in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Nikara (निकर) [Also spelled nikar]:—(nm) heap, pile, bundle; multitude, flock; shorts half-pants.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Ṇikara (णिकर) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Nikara.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Nikara (ನಿಕರ):—

1) [noun] a crowd of people.

2) [noun] a pile or mound of things, usu. Jumbled together; a heap.

3) [noun] a number of things tied together; a bundle.

4) [noun] the essential being which makes something what it is; essence.

5) [noun] a befitting gift or presentation.

6) [noun] a treasure or the best of anything.

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Nikara (ನಿಕರ):—[adjective] exact; precise; accurate.

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Nikara (ನಿಕರ):—[noun] the quality being accurate; precision; exactness.

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Nikāra (ನಿಕಾರ):—

1) [noun] a winnowing of corn.

2) [noun] the act of lifting up.

3) [noun] the act or an instance of killing; slaughter.

4) [noun] a hurting of another’s pride or dignity by treating contemptuously; humiliation.

5) [noun] wickedness, malice or hatred.

6) [noun] an opposed condition; hostility.

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Nikāra (ನಿಕಾರ):—

1) [noun] the quality of condition of being clean; cleanliness.

2) [noun] a washed, clean cloth.

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Nīkara (ನೀಕರ):—

1) [noun] the act of removing or taking off.

2) [noun] a disdainful treatment; a looking down upon; contempt.

3) [noun] he who removes; a remover.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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