Mitrasaha, aka: Mitra-saha, Mitrasāha; 3 Definition(s)

Introduction

Mitrasaha means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Mitrasaha in Purana glossary... « previous · [M] · next »

Mitrasaha (मित्रसह):—Another name for Saudāsa (son of Sudāsa). (see Bhāgavata Purāṇa 9.9.18)

Source: Wisdom Library: Bhagavata Purana

Mitrasaha (मित्रसह).—See Saudāsa—also Kalmāṣapāda.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa IX. 9. 18; Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 63. 176; Vāyu-purāṇa 88. 176.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Mitrasaha in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [M] · next »

Mitrasāha (मित्रसाह).—a. kind or indulgent to friends; स्वैर्दौहित्रैस्तारितो मित्रसाहः (svairdauhitraistārito mitrasāhaḥ) Mb.1.93.28.

Mitrasāha is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms mitra and sāha (साह).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 572 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Mitra
Mitra (मित्र).—n. (-traṃ) 1. A friend. 2. An ally; in this form it is always neuter; but it is ...
Sahaja
Sahajā (सहजा, “natural”) refers to one of the two types of pratibhā (poetic intuition) accordin...
Sahadeva
Sahadeva (सहदेव).—m. (-vaḥ) The youngest of the five Pandava princes, begotten on Madri by the ...
Vishvamitra
Viśvāmitra (विश्वामित्र).—m. (-traḥ) A Muni, the son of Gad'Hi, originally of the military orde...
Saha
Saha (सह).—mfn. (-haḥ-hā-haṃ) Patient, enduring, suffering, bearing. m. (-haḥ) The month Agraha...
Sumitra
Sumitra (सुमित्र).—m. (-traḥ) The father of the twentieth Jina of the present era. f. (-trā) On...
Sahokti
Sahokti (सहोक्ति).—f. (-ktiḥ) 1. A figure of rhetoric; either the employment of a word in a dou...
Sahakara
Sahakāra (सहकार).—m. (-raḥ) 1. A fragrant sort of mango. 2. Co-operation. E. saha with, kṛ to m...
Sahajati
Sahajāti (सहजाति) was an important town of ancient Cedi: one of the sixteen Mahājanapadas of th...
Sarvasaha
Sarvasaha (सर्वसह).—see Sarvaṃsaha.
Sahasika
Sāhasika (साहसिक).—a. (-kī f.) [साहसे प्रसृतः ठक् (sāhase prasṛtaḥ ṭhak)]1) Using great force o...
Balamitra
Balamitra (बलमित्र).—A king. Śatrughna who led the yāga horse of Śrī Rāma fought with Vīramaṇi ...
Sahacara
Sahacara (सहचर).—mfn. (-raḥ-rī-raṃ) Accompanying, going or associating with, &c. mf. (-raḥ-...
Sahamarana
Sahamaraṇa (सहमरण).—n. (-ṇaṃ) Concremation, a widow’s burning herself with the corpse of her hu...
Sahabhojana
Sahabhojana (सहभोजन).—n. (-naṃ) Eating in company. E. saha together, bhojana food.

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