Mahayasha, Mahayasa, Mahāyasa, Mahāyaśa, Mahāyaśā: 8 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Mahayasha means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Mahāyaśa and Mahāyaśā can be transliterated into English as Mahayasa or Mahayasha, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Mahayasha in Purana glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Mahāyaśa (महायश).—A son of Samkṛti; married Satkṛtī and had two sons, Gurudhi and Rantideva.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 49. 36-7.
Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Mahāyaśā (महायशा) refers to the name of a Lady mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. IX.45.27). Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Mahāyaśā) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names

Of Thaton, author of the Kaccayanabheda and the Kaccayanasara. He probably belonged to the fourteenth century. Bode, op. cit., 36f.; Svd.1250.

context information

Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: archive.org: The Indian Buddhist Iconography

Mahāyaśā (महायशा) is one of the twenty-four Goddesses surrounding Buddhakapāla in the buddhakapālamaṇḍala, according to the 5th-century Sādhanamālā (a collection of sādhana texts that contain detailed instructions for rituals).—Buddhakapāla refers to one of the various emanations of Akṣobhya and the sādhana says that when Heruka is embraced by Citrasenā he gets the name of Buddhakapāla.—Mahāyaśā stands in the south-west of the outermost circle. She has a blue colour two arms, one face, ornaments of bones, brown hair rising upwards but no garlands of heads. She  carries the kapāla in the left and the kartri in the right, and dances in the ardhaparyaṅka attitude.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
context information

Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Mahayasha in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

mahāyasa : (adj.) of great fame.

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Mahayasha in Sanskrit glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mahāyasa (महायस):—[from mahā > mah] (hāy) mfn. having much iron (as an arrow which has a large point, [Nīlakaṇṭha]), [Mahābhārata]

[Sanskrit to German]

Mahayasha in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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