Kunja, Kuñja, Kumja: 18 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Kunja means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Kuñja (कुञ्ज).—A reputed sage. Once he enjoyed the company of Pramlocā, the celestial woman. (See under Pramlocā).

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Kuñja (कुञ्ज) refers to “hedges and groves”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.2.22. Accordingly as Śiva said to Sitā:—“[...] O my beloved, beautiful woman, clouds will not reach the place where I have to make an abode for you. [...] O beloved, do you wish to go to the Himālayas, the king of mountains (acalendra) wherein there is spring for ever, which abounds in hedges and groves (kuñja) where the cuckoos coo in diverse pleasing ways and which contains many lakes filled with cool water and hundreds of lotuses”.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Vaishnavism (Vaishava dharma)

Source: Pure Bhakti: Bhajana-rahasya - 2nd Edition

Kuñja (कुञ्ज) refers to:—A grove or bower; a natural shady retreat with a roof and walls formed by trees, vines, creepers and other climbing plants. (cf. Glossary page from Bhajana-Rahasya).

Source: Pure Bhakti: Brhad Bhagavatamrtam

Kuñja (कुञ्ज) refers to:—Grove or bower. (cf. Glossary page from Śrī Bṛhad-bhāgavatāmṛta).

Vaishnavism book cover
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Vaishnava (वैष्णव, vaiṣṇava) or vaishnavism (vaiṣṇavism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshipping Vishnu as the supreme Lord. Similar to the Shaktism and Shaivism traditions, Vaishnavism also developed as an individual movement, famous for its exposition of the dashavatara (‘ten avatars of Vishnu’).

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

kuñja : (nt.) a glen; dell.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Kuñja, (m.) a hollow, a glen, dell, used by Dhpāla in explanation of kuñjara at VvA. 35 (kuñjaro ti kuñje giritale ramati) and PvA. 57 (kuṃ pathaviṃ jīrayati kuñjo suvāraṃ aticarati kuñjaro ti). —nadī° a river glen DA. I, 209. (Page 219)

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

kuñja (कुंज).—m The angle of junction formed by two parts of a roof: the angle or turn of a road, river &c.: also of two pieces of a caukaṭa or quadrangular frame. 2 The roll or band of grass applied along the corners of a chuppered roof.

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kuñja (कुंज).—m n S A place overshadowed with creeping plants, a bower or an arbor.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

kuñja (कुंज).—m n An arbour, a bower.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Kuñja (कुञ्ज).—

1) A place overgrown with plants or creepers, a bower, an arbour; चल सखि कुञ्जं सतिमिरपुञ्जं शीलय नीलनिचोलम् (cala sakhi kuñjaṃ satimirapuñjaṃ śīlaya nīlanicolam) Gīt.5; वञ्जुललताकुञ्जे (vañjulalatākuñje) 12; Me.19; R.9.64.

2) The lower jaw.

3) A cave, Māl.1.3. (foot note).

4) A tooth.

5) The tusk of an elephant.

Derivable forms: kuñjaḥ (कुञ्जः), kuñjam (कुञ्जम्).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kuñja (कुञ्ज).—mn.

(-ñjaḥ-ñjaṃ) 1. A place overgrown with creeping plants, a bower, an arbour. 2. An elephant’s tusk or ivory. 3. The lower jaw. E. ku the earth, and ja produced, ma inserted.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kuñja (कुञ्ज).—m. 1. A place overgrown with creeping plants, a bower, [Meghadūta, (ed. Gildemeister.)] 19. 2. A cavern, [Rāmāyaṇa] 4, 26, 6; [Raghuvaṃśa, (ed. Stenzler.)] 9, 64.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kuñja (कुञ्ज).—[masculine] bush, bower.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

Kuñja (कुञ्ज) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—poet. [Sūktikarṇāmṛta by Śrīdharadāsa]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Kuñja (कुञ्ज):—m. [am n., [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]] a place overrun with plants or overgrown with creepers, bower, arbour, [Mahābhārata] etc.

2) (with sarasvatyās) ‘the bower of Sarasvatī’, Name of a Tīrtha, [Mahābhārata iii, 6078 ff.]

3) the lower jaw, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) an elephant’s tusk or jaw, [Pāṇini 5-2, 107], [vArttika]

5) a tooth, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) Name of a man, [Pāṇini 4-1, 98.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kuñja (कुञ्ज):—[(ñjaḥ-ñjaṃ)] 1. m. n. A place overgrown with creeping plants, a bower; elephant’s tusk, ivory; the lower jaw.

[Sanskrit to German]

Kunja in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Kuṃja (ಕುಂಜ):—

1) [noun] a dwelling or resting placed, enclosed by foliage; an arbour; a bower.

2) [noun] the lower jaw (in vertebrates); the mandible jaw.

3) [noun] in elephants, a very long, large, pointed tooth, usu. one of a pair, projecting outside the mouth; the tusk.

4) [noun] a large hollow in the side of a cliff, hill, etc. or underground; a cave.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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