Kunjara, Kuñjara: 18 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Kunjara means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

1) Kuñjara (कुञ्जर).—A great monkey. Añjanā mother of Hanūmān was the daughter of Kuñjara. (Vālmīki Rāmāyaṇa, Kiṣkindhā Kāṇḍa; Canto 66, Verse 9).

2) Kuñjara (कुञ्जर).—A well-known serpent. (Ādi Parva, Chapter 35, Verse 15).

3) Kuñjara (कुञ्जर).—A prince of the Sāuvīra country. He was a follower of Jayadratha, and was killed by Arjuna. (Vana Parva, Chapter 271).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1a) Kuñjara (कुञ्जर).—An Asura in Atalam (fourth tala or {%gabhastalam, Vāyu-purāṇa)1 A commander of Tāraka with a chariot of horses; killed by Kapāli and other Rudras after a terrific fight.2

  • 1) Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 20. 32; Vāyu-purāṇa 50. 31.
  • 2) Matsya-purāṇa 148. 42-50; 153. 29-30, 51-68.

1b) Father of Añjanā, and father-in-law of Kesari; a Nāga.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 7. 223 and 233, 350.

1c) (Mt.) abode of Agastya.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 163. 79.
Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Kuñjara (कुञ्जर) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. I.31.15, I.35, II.48.20, II.48.25) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Kuñjara) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names

1. Devanampiyatissas elephant, tied to the plough which marked the sima of the Mahavihara. Dpv.xiv.28; Mbv.134; see also Mhv., p.331.

2. One of the chief lay patrons of Revata Buddha. Bu.vi.23.

context information

Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Tibetan Buddhism

Kuñjara (कुञ्जर) is the name of a Rāśi (zodiac sign) mentioned as attending the teachings in the 6th century Mañjuśrīmūlakalpa: one of the largest Kriyā Tantras devoted to Mañjuśrī (the Bodhisattva of wisdom) representing an encyclopedia of knowledge primarily concerned with ritualistic elements in Buddhism. The teachings in this text originate from Mañjuśrī and were taught to and by Buddha Śākyamuni in the presence of a large audience (including Kuñjara).

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
context information

Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Kuñjara.—(IE 7-1-2), ‘eight’. Note: kuñjara is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Kunjara in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

kuñjara : (m.) elephant.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Kuñjara, (m.) (Deriv. unknown. The sound is not unlike an elephant’s trumpeting & need not be Aryan, which has hasti. The Sk. of the epics & fables uses both h° and k°) an elephant Vin. II, 195; M. I, 229, 375; S. I, 157; Dh. 322, 324, 327; J. V, 336; Vv 51; Pv. I, 113; DhA. IV, 4; ThA. 252; Miln. 245.—deva° chief of the gods, Ep. of Sakka Vv 477; J. V, 158.

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

kuñjara (कुंजर).—m (S) An elephant. 2 In comp. Preeminent; as puruṣakuñjara An excellent man. 3 A particular bird.

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kuñjarā (कुंजरा).—m A kind of grass used as a vegetable. 2 A caste or an individual of it. They are venders of vegetables &c. 3 fig. A low, mean fellow, a scrub.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

kuñjara (कुंजर).—m An elephant. In comp. Pre-em- inent; as purūṣakuñjara An excellent man.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Kuñjara (कुञ्जर).—[kuñjo hastihanuḥ so'syāsti, kuñja-ra, ūṣasuṣipuṣka madhoraḥ P.V.2.17. Vārt.]

1) An elephant; प्राक्छाये कुञ्जरस्य च (prākchāye kuñjarasya ca) Ms.3.274. दन्तयोर्हन्ति कुञ्जरम् (dantayorhanti kuñjaram) Mahābhārata on P.II.3.36.

2) Anything pre-eminent or excellent of its class (at the end of comp. only). Amara gives the following words used similarly :-स्युरुत्तरपदे व्याघ्रपुङ्गवर्षभकुञ्जराः । सिंहशार्दूलनागाद्याः पुंसि श्रेष्ठार्थवाचकाः (syuruttarapade vyāghrapuṅgavarṣabhakuñjarāḥ | siṃhaśārdūlanāgādyāḥ puṃsi śreṣṭhārthavācakāḥ) ||

3) The Aśvattha tree.

4) The lunar asterism called हस्त (hasta).

5) Hair.

6) Head.

7) An ornament; कुञ्जरः कुन्तले पुमान् मस्तके भूषणे नागे (kuñjaraḥ kuntale pumān mastake bhūṣaṇe nāge) ... Nm.

8) The number 'eight' (from eight elephants of the cardinal points).

-rā, -rī 1 A female elephant.

2) Name of a flower-plant.

Derivable forms: kuñjaraḥ (कुञ्जरः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kuñjara (कुञ्जर).—m.

(-raḥ) 1. An elephant. 2. (In composition,) Pre-eminent, as puruṣakuñjara an excellent. man. 3. Hair. 4. A country. f. (-rā or -rī) 1. A female elephant.

(-rā) 1. A plant, (Bignonia suave-olens.) 2. A shrub, (Grislea tomentosa) E. kuñja a tusk, an arbour, &c. and ra what forms or possesses.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kuñjara (कुञ्जर).— (probably akin to the preceding), m. 1. An elephant, [Pañcatantra] i. [distich] 177. 2. Preeminent, [Rāmāyaṇa] 5, 2, 13; in this meaning it is generally the latter part of a compound, e. g. kapi-, m. A most excellent monkey (literally, an elephant among monkeys), [Rāmāyaṇa] 5, 3, 17. 3. The name of a Nāga, or serpent, Mahābhārata 1, 1560. 4. The name of a prince, 3, 15597. 5. The name of a mountain, [Rāmāyaṇa] 4, 41, 50.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Kuñjara (कुञ्जर).—[masculine] elephant ([feminine] ī); chief or best of (—°).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Kuñjara (कुञ्जर):—m. (ifc. f(ā). , [Mahābhārata; Rāmāyaṇa]) an elephant, [Manu-smṛti iii, 274; Mahābhārata] etc.

2) anything pre-eminent in its kind (generally in [compound] e.g. rāja-k, ‘an eminent king’ [Mahābhārata; Kathāsaritsāgara]; cf. [Pāṇini 2-1, 62 and] [gana] vyāghrādi)

3) the number ‘eight’ (there being eight elephants of the cardinal points), [Sūryasiddhānta]

4) a kind of temple, [Varāha-mihira’s Bṛhat-saṃhitā]

5) a kind of step (in dancing to music)

6) the tree Ficus religiosa, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) Name of a Nāga, [Mahābhārata i, 1560]

8) of a prince (of the Sauvīraka race), [Mahābhārata iii, 15597]

9) of a mountain, [Harivaṃśa; Rāmāyaṇa]

10) of a locality

11) Kuñjarā (कुञ्जरा):—[from kuñjara] f. a female elephant, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

12) [v.s. ...] the plant Bignonia suaveolens, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

13) [v.s. ...] the plant Grislea tomentosa

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Böhtlingk and Roth Grosses Petersburger Wörterbuch

Kuñjara (कुञ्जर):—[Pāṇini’s acht Bücher 5, 2, 107, Vārttika von Kātyāyana. 1.] [Vopadeva’s Grammatik 7, 32. 33.] m. a) Elephant [Amarakoṣa 2, 8, 2, 2.] [Hemacandra’s Abhidhānacintāmaṇi 1217.] [Anekārthasaṃgraha 3, 542.] [Medinīkoṣa Rāmāyaṇa 139.] [Manu’s Gesetzbuch 3, 274.] [Mahābhārata 1, 1135. 3, 978. 1598.] [Nalopākhyāna 12, 97.] [Hiḍimbavadha 4, 8.] [Sundopasundopākhyāna 2, 20.] [Rāmāyaṇa 2, 40, 29. 3, 15. 4. 33, 29. 5, 3, 16. 6, 33, 2. 34, 24.] [Viśvāmitra’s Kampf 3, 17.] [Suśruta 1, 22, 4. 2, 144, 7. 168, 1.] [Pañcatantra I, 177. 377. III, 270.] [Dhūrtasamāgama 74, 4.] [Bhāgavatapurāṇa 6, 1, 10.] Am Ende eines adj. comp. f. ā [Mahābhārata 15, 610.] [Rāmāyaṇa 5, 27, 20. 47, 33.] — b) der Elephant, als das grösste und klügste der Thiere, wird zum Ausdruck des Vorzüglichsten in seiner Art. harimukhyasya kuñjarasya [Rāmāyaṇa 5, 2, 13] (vgl. kuñjaraprakhyā vānarāḥ [4, 31. 15. 6, 16, 20]). Gewöhnlich in comp. mit dem verglichenen Wesen [Pāṇini’s acht Bücher 2, 1, 62.] gaṇa vyāghrādi zu [56.] [Amarakoṣa 3, 2, 8.] [Hemacandra’s Abhidhānacintāmaṇi 1440.] go [Pāṇini’s acht Bücher 2, 1, 62,] [Scholiast] kapi [Rāmāyaṇa 5, 3, 17. 6, 38, 39.] rāja [Mahābhārata 3, 15181. 15340.] — c) Ficus religiosa Lin. (vgl. kuñjarāśana) [Trikāṇḍaśeṣa 2, 4, 2.] — d) Nomen proprium eines Nāga [Mahābhārata 1, 1560. 16, 119.] — e) Nomen proprium eines Fürsten aus dem Stamme der Sauviraka [Mahābhārata 3, 15597.] — f) Nomen proprium eines Berges: cakāra (mahādevaḥ) kuñjaraṃ caiva kuñjarapratimākṛtim [Harivaṃśa 12393.] kuñjaraḥ parvataścaiva yatrāgastyagṛhaṃ śubham [12845.] [Rāmāyaṇa 4, 41, 50.] Nomen proprium einer Gegend [Śabdaratnāvalī im Śabdakalpadruma -] [Hemacandra’s Anekārthasaṃgraha] und [Medinīkoṣa] haben noch die Bed. g) Haupthaar.

2) f. ā und ī Elephantenweibchen [Śabdacandrikā im Śabdakalpadruma] —

3) f. ā Name zweier Pflanzen: a) Bignonia suaveolens Roxb. — b) Grislea tomentosa Roxb. [Hemacandra’s Anekārthasaṃgraha] [Medinīkoṣa] — Das Wort wird von kuñja [1,b] oder c abgeleitet, aber diese nicht belegbaren Bedeutt. sind vielleicht erst aus kuñjara geschlossen worden; eher könnte man kuñjara mit kuñja [1,a] in Verbindung bringen.

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Kuñjara (कुञ्जर):—

1) b) rāja [Kathāsaritsāgara 72, 23.] — f) Nomen proprium einer Oertlichkeit [Oxforder Handschriften 339,a,43.] kujara v. l. — h) Bez. einer best. Tempelform [Varāhamihira’s Bṛhajjātaka S. 56, 18. 25.]

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Kuñjara (कुञ्जर):—

1) (dieses hinzuzufügen) a) als Bez. der Zahl acht [Sūryasiddhānta 2, 19. 24. 12, 88.]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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