Jatakarman, Jātakarman, Jata-karman: 11 definitions

Introduction:

Jatakarman means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Arthashastra (politics and welfare)

Source: Knowledge Traditions & Practices of India: Society State and Polity: A Survey

Jātakarman (जातकर्मन्) refers to the “rituals at childbirth” and represents one of the sixteen saṃskāras, or “ceremonies” accompanying the individual during the Gṛhastha (householder) stage of the Āśrama way of life. These ceremonies (e.g., jātakarman-saṃskāra) are community affairs and at each ceremony relations and friends gather for community eating.

Arthashastra book cover
context information

Arthashastra (अर्थशास्त्र, arthaśāstra) literature concerns itself with the teachings (shastra) of economic prosperity (artha) statecraft, politics and military tactics. The term arthashastra refers to both the name of these scientific teachings, as well as the name of a Sanskrit work included in such literature. This book was written (3rd century BCE) by by Kautilya, who flourished in the 4th century BCE.

Discover the meaning of jatakarman in the context of Arthashastra from relevant books on Exotic India

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Jatakarman in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Jātakarman (जातकर्मन्) refers to “post-natal sacred rites”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.7.—Accordingly, after the Goddess (Umā/Śivā) incarnated as Pārvatī by becoming the daughter of Menā:—“[...] The lord of mountains rejoiced on seeing the child shining in dark splendour like that of the blue lotus. All the citizens there, both men and women, rejoiced much. There were great festivities. Different sorts of musical instruments were played. Auspicious songs were sung. The dancing girls exhibited their saltatorial skill. The lord of mountains performed post-natal sacred rites [i.e., jātakarma-vidha] and made charitable gifts to the Brahmins. [...]”.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Discover the meaning of jatakarman in the context of Purana from relevant books on Exotic India

India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Jāta-karman.—(EI 4), a ceremony performed at the birth of a child. Note: jāta-karman is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

Discover the meaning of jatakarman in the context of India history from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Jatakarman in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Jātakarman (जातकर्मन्).—n. a ceremony performed at the birth of a child; Ms.2.27,29; R.3.18.

Jātakarman is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms jāta and karman (कर्मन्).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Jātakarman (जातकर्मन्).—n. (-rma) 1. A ceremony performed when the navel string is divided, touching the infant’s tongue thrice with ghee, with appropriate prayers, &c. 2. Delivery &c. of a newborn infant. E. jāta born, and karman rite.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Jātakarman (जातकर्मन्).—n. the ceremony on the birth of a child, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 27.

Jātakarman is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms jāta and karman (कर्मन्).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Jātakarman (जातकर्मन्).—[neuter] the ceremony after birth.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

Jātakarman (जातकर्मन्) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—[dharma] from the Saṃskārabhāskara. Ak 360.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Jātakarman (जातकर्मन्):—[=jāta-karman] [from jāta] n. a birth-ceremony (consisting in touching a newly-born child’s tongue thrice with ghee after appropriate prayers), [Śāṅkhāyana-gṛhya-sūtra; Gṛhyāsaṃgraha; Manu-smṛti ii, 27 and 29; Yājñavalkya i, 11; Mahābhārata] etc.

2) [v.s. ...] (cf, [Religious Thought and Life in India pp.353&357.])

[Sanskrit to German]

Jatakarman in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of jatakarman in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

See also (Relevant definitions)

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: