Jatakarman, aka: Jata-karman, Jātakarman; 3 Definition(s)

Introduction

Jatakarman means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Arthashastra (politics and welfare)

Jatakarman in Arthashastra glossary... « previous · [J] · next »

Jātakarman (जातकर्मन्) refers to the “rituals at childbirth” and represents one of the sixteen saṃskāras, or “ceremonies” accompanying the individual during the Gṛhastha (householder) stage of the Āśrama way of life. These ceremonies (eg., jātakarman-saṃskāra) are community affairs and at each ceremony relations and friends gather for community eating.

Source: Knowledge Traditions & Practices of India: Society State and Polity: A Survey
Arthashastra book cover
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Arthashastra (अर्थशास्त्र, arthaśāstra) literature concerns itself with the teachings (shastra) of economic prosperity (artha) statecraft, politics and military tactics. The term arthashastra refers to both the name of these scientific teachings, as well as the name of a Sanskrit work included in such literature. This book was written (3rd century BCE) by by Kautilya, who flourished in the 4th century BCE.

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India history and geogprahy

Jāta-karman.—(EI 4), a ceremony performed at the birth of a child. Note: jāta-karman is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary
India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Jatakarman in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [J] · next »

Jātakarman (जातकर्मन्).—n. a ceremony performed at the birth of a child; Ms.2.27,29; R.3.18.

Jātakarman is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms jāta and karman (कर्मन्).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 708 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Jata
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Sujata
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Karmakanda
Karmakāṇḍa (कर्मकाण्ड).—that department of the Veda which relates to ceremonial acts and sacrif...
Karmabhumi
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Jatakarma
Jatakarma refers to one of those ceremonies of the Nambutiris performed after marriage, during ...
Sadyojata
Sadyojāta (सद्योजात).—m. (-taḥ) A calf. E. sadyas in a moment, and jāta born.
Sahajati
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Karmendriya
Karmendriya (कर्मेन्द्रिय).—an organ of action, as distinguished from ज्ञानेन्द्रिय (jñānendriy...
Karman
Karman.—(IE 7-1-2), ‘ten’. (EI 3), eight in kind. Note: karman is defined in the “Indian epigra...
Trijata
1) Trijaṭa (त्रिजट).—(GĀRGYA). A sage. Though he was a sage he lived by farming. He had a wife ...
Karmavipaka
Karmavipāka (कर्मविपाक) or Karmavipākajñānabala refers to one of the “ten powers” (daśabala) of...
Jatadhara
Jatādhara (जताधर).—A warrior of Subrahmaṇya. (Mahābhārata Śalya Parva, Chapter 45, Verse 61).
Jatabhara
Jaṭabhāra (जटभार).—mass of braided hair. Derivable forms: jaṭabhāraḥ (जटभारः).Jaṭabhāra is a Sa...
Ekajata
1) Ekajaṭā (एकजटा).—A demoness of the castle of Rāvaṇa. This demoness talked very enticingly to...
Jatarupa
Jātarūpa (जातरूप).—a. beautiful, brilliant. (-pam) 1 gold; पुनश्च याचमानाय जातरूपमदात् प्रभुः (...

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