Jatakarma, Jātakarma, Jata-karma, Jātakarmā: 8 definitions

Introduction

Jatakarma means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Dharmashastra (religious law)

Source: Shodhganga: Facts of society in the Manusamhita

Jātakarma (जातकर्म) is performed by the necessities of the case immedia tely after birth of a child. The ancient Sūtra and Sṃrti works mention this ceremony in different ways. Manu states that this is performed before the navel string is cut off and gives to the child to eat gold, honey a nd ghee with the recitation of mantra. Āśvalāyana mentions that this ceremony is performed before the touching of other persons the child.

Dharmashastra book cover
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Dharmashastra (धर्मशास्त्र, dharmaśāstra) contains the instructions (shastra) regarding religious conduct of livelihood (dharma), ceremonies, jurisprudence (study of law) and more. It is categorized as smriti, an important and authoritative selection of books dealing with the Hindu lifestyle.

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Vaishnavism (Vaishava dharma)

Source: ISKCON Press: Glossary

Jātakarma (जातकर्म) is a Sanskrit word referring to a purificatory ceremony performed at the birth of a child.

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Vaishnava (वैष्णव, vaiṣṇava) or vaishnavism (vaiṣṇavism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshipping Vishnu as the supreme Lord. Similar to the Shaktism and Shaivism traditions, Vaishnavism also developed as an individual movement, famous for its exposition of the dashavatara (‘ten avatars of Vishnu’).

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous (J) next»] — Jatakarma in Purana glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Jātakarmā (जातकर्मा).—Birth-ceremonial, done by Nanda to Kṛṣṇa;1 Buda's birth-ritual, as also of Vāmana-Kṛṣṇa;2 of Sagara.3

  • 1) Bhāgavata-purāṇa X. 5. 1-16; Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 42. 43; 50. 24; 63. 133; Viṣṇu-purāṇa III. 10. 4-15; 13. 2.
  • 2) Matsya-purāṇa 24. 5-7; 245. 66; 275. 18.
  • 3) Viṣṇu-purāṇa IV. 3. 36.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous (J) next»] — Jatakarma in Shaktism glossary
Source: JSTOR: Tāntric Dīkṣā by Surya Kanta

Jātakarma (जातकर्म) refers to one of the eleven saṃskāras (purificatory rites of fire) forming part of preliminary rites before Dīkṣā: an important ritual of Śāktism described in the Śāradātilaka-tantra, chapters III-V.

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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous (J) next»] — Jatakarma in Shaivism glossary
Source: archive.org: Sardhatrisatikalottaragama

Jātakarma (जातकर्म) refers to the “birth ceremony”, which is mentioned as one of the fire-rituals related to the kuṇḍa (“fire-pit”), according to the various Āgamas and related literature. Jātakarma is mentioned in the Sārdhatriśati (chapter 6), Mataṅgapārameśvara (Kriyā-pāda, chap 4), Mṛgendra-āgama (Kriyā-pāda, chapter 6), Acintyaviśvasādākhya (chapter 14), Suprabheda-āgama (Kriyā-pāda, chapter 11), Kiraṇa-āgama (kriyā-pāda, chpater 4), Pūrvakāmika-āgama (chapter 8), Pūrvakāraṇa-āgama (chapter 22), Ajita-āgama (Kriyā-pāda, chapter 21), Raurava-āgama (Kriyā-pāda, chapter 15), Vīra-āgama (chapter 41), Dīpta-āgama (chapter 33), Cintya-āgama (chapter 10), Makuṭa-āgama (chapter 6) and the Svāyambhuva-āgama (chapter 17).

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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India history and geogprahy

Source: Project Gutenberg: Castes and Tribes of Southern India, Volume 1

Jatakarma refers to one of those ceremonies of the Nambutiris performed after marriage, during pregnancy or during the birth of a child. Jatakarma is the name of the birth ceremony, and is performed by the father of the child. Honey and ghī are introduced into the mouth of the infant with a golden spoon or rod, to symbolise good fortune. Then the ears and shoulders are touched with the spoon or rod, while Vedic texts are recited.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

[«previous (J) next»] — Jatakarma in Marathi glossary
Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

jātakarma (जातकर्म).—n (S) One of the sixteen saṃskāra;--giving the infant clarified butter out of a golden spoon before dividing the navel string.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

jātakarma (जातकर्म).—n One of the sixteen saṃskāras, giv- ing the infant clarified butter out of a golden spoon before dividing the navel string.

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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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