Gridhrakuta, Gṛdhrakuṭa, Gṛdhrakūṭa, Gridhra-kuta: 9 definitions

Introduction:

Gridhrakuta means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Gṛdhrakuṭa and Gṛdhrakūṭa can be transliterated into English as Grdhrakuta or Gridhrakuta, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Gridhrakuta in Purana glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Gṛdhrakuṭa (गृध्रकुट).—In the left hand of the śilā when sages performed tapas in the form of an eagle; visit to it leads to Śivaloka;1 in Gayā;2 fit for śrāddha.3

  • 1) Vāyu-purāṇa 108. 61-2.
  • 2) Ib. 109. 15; 111. 22, 42.
  • 3) Ib. 77. 38, 97.
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Discover the meaning of gridhrakuta or grdhrakuta in the context of Purana from relevant books on Exotic India

In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Tibetan Buddhist Teachers, Deities and other Spiritual beings

Gṛdhrakūṭa (गृध्रकूट) is the name of a Mountain associated with Cūḍapanthaka—one of the Sixteen Arhats (known in Tibetan as gnas brtan bcu drug) who were chosen by Buddha Shakyamuni to remain in the world and protect the Dharma until the arrival of the future Buddha Maitreya. They vowed to maintain the Dharma for as long as beings could benefit from it. These legendary Arhats [e.g., Cūḍapanthaka on Mount Gṛdhrakūṭa] were revered in countries such as China, Japan, India and Tibet—a tradition which continues up until this day, for example in Zen Buddhism and Tibetan art.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
context information

Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

Discover the meaning of gridhrakuta or grdhrakuta in the context of Tibetan Buddhism from relevant books on Exotic India

General definition (in Buddhism)

[«previous next»] — Gridhrakuta in Buddhism glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Buddhism

Grdhrakuta:—A mountain in India also called “Eagle Peak”

Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Gridhrakuta in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Gṛdhrakūṭa (गृध्रकूट).—Name of a mountain near Rājagṛha.

Derivable forms: gṛdhrakūṭaḥ (गृध्रकूटः).

Gṛdhrakūṭa is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms gṛdhra and kūṭa (कूट).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Gṛdhrakūṭa (गृध्रकूट) or Citrakūṭa.—m. names of mountains, [Meghadūta, (ed. Gildemeister.)] 17; [Hitopadeśa] 18, 6; [Rāmāyaṇa] 1, 1, 30.

Gṛdhrakūṭa is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms gṛdhra and kūṭa (कूट).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Gṛdhrakūṭa (गृध्रकूट).—[masculine] vulture-peak ([Name] of a mountain).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Gṛdhrakūṭa (गृध्रकूट):—[=gṛdhra-kūṭa] [from gṛdhra > gṛdh] m. ‘vulture-peak’, Name of a mountain near Rājagṛha, [Mahābhārata xii, 1797; Lalita-vistara] etc., [Hitopadeśa]

[Sanskrit to German]

Gridhrakuta in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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See also (Relevant definitions)

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