Ekaksha, aka: Ekākṣa, Ekākṣā, Eka-aksha; 7 Definition(s)

Introduction

Ekaksha means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Ekākṣa and Ekākṣā can be transliterated into English as Ekaksa or Ekaksha, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Ekaksha in Purana glossary... « previous · [E] · next »

1) Ekākṣa (एकाक्ष).—A demon born to Kaśyapaprajāpati of his wife Danu. (Śloka 29, Chapter 65, Ādi Parva, Mahābhārata).

2) Ekākṣa (एकाक्ष).—A soldier of Skandadeva. (Śloka 58, Chapter 45, Śalya Parva, Mahābhārata).

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopaedia

1) Ekākṣa (एकाक्ष).—A Dānava with manuṣya-dharma.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 6. 15; Vāyu-purāṇa 68. 15.

2) Ekākṣā (एकाक्षा).—A river of the Ketumāla country.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 44. 20.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Ekākṣa (एकाक्ष) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. I.59.28, I.65, IX.44.54) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Ekākṣa) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Discover the meaning of ekaksha or ekaksa in the context of Purana from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Ekaksha in Marathi glossary... « previous · [E] · next »

ēkākṣa (एकाक्ष).—a S Monoculous, one-eyed.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

ēkākṣa (एकाक्ष).—a One-eyed.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

Discover the meaning of ekaksha or ekaksa in the context of Marathi from relevant books on Exotic India

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Ekākṣa (एकाक्ष).—a.

1) having only one axle. द्विचक्रमेकाक्षम् (dvicakramekākṣam) (ratham) Bhāg.4.26.1.

2) having one eye.

3) having an excellent eye. (-kṣaḥ) 1 a crow.

2) Name of Śiva.

Ekākṣa is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms eka and akṣa (अक्ष).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Ekākṣa (एकाक्ष).—mfn.

(-kṣaḥ-kṣā-kṣaṃ) One-eyed. m.

(-kṣaḥ) A crow. E. eka and akṣi an eye.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of ekaksha or ekaksa in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

Relevant definitions

Search found 927 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Lohitaksha
Lohitākṣa (लोहिताक्ष).—red-eye, (1) (n. of a gem, not in Sanskrit dictionaries, but occurs in P...
Virupaksha
Virūpākṣa (विरूपाक्ष) is the name of a Yakṣa who, due to Kubera’s curse, was born on the earth ...
Eka
Eka (एक, “one”) is the first of sixty digits (decimal place) in an special enumeration system m...
Ekapada
Ekapāda (एकपाद).—In iconography, ekapāda does not come under the heading sthānaka, but is found...
Akshamala
Akṣamālā (अक्षमाला, “prayer beads”) refers to one of the several “attributes” (āyudha) or “acce...
Aksha
Akṣa (अक्ष).—m. (-kṣaḥ) 1. A die, cubic or oblong, for playing with. 2. Part of a car. 3. A whe...
Hiranyaksha
Hiraṇyākṣa (हिरण्याक्ष).—m. (-kṣaḥ) The name of a demon, killed by Vishnu. E. hiraṇya, and akṣa...
Ekanta
Ekānta (एकान्त) refers to “absolutistic attitude” and represents one of the five types of ...
Ekacakra
Ekacakra (एकचक्र).—m. (-kraḥ) The name of a city: see harigṛha. E. eka, cakra a circle.
Gavaksha
Gavākṣa (गवाक्ष).—m. (-kṣaḥ) 1. An air hole, a loop hole, a round window, a bull’s eye, &c....
Pundarikaksha
Puṇḍarīkākṣa (पुण्डरीकाक्ष).—an epithet of Viṣṇu; यं पुण्डरीकाक्षमिव श्रिता श्रीः (yaṃ puṇḍarīk...
Vishalaksha
Viśālākṣa (विशालाक्ष).—(1) n. of a disciple of Buddha: Mv i.183.1; (2) n. of a yakṣa: Māy 51.
Ekata
Ekatā (एकता).—f. (-tā) Unity, oneness. E. eka and tal affix. or with tva aff. ekatva n. (-tvaṃ)
Ekavali
Ekāvalī (एकावली).—f. (-lī) A single string of beads, flowers, &c. E. eka and āvalī a row.
Ekakshara
Ekākṣarā (एकाक्षरा) refers to the name of a Lady mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. IX.45.24). ...

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: