Aksha, aka: Akṣa; 10 Definition(s)

Introduction

Aksha means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Akṣa can be transliterated into English as Aksa or Aksha, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Dharmashastra (religious law)

Akṣa (अक्ष) refers to the “gambling”. It is part of a ten-fold set arising from the love of pleasure. The word is used throughout Dharmaśāstra literature such as the Manusmṛti. (also see the Manubhāṣya verse 7.47)

Akṣa (अक्ष) is a Sanskrit technical term referring the piece of wood in the wheel (the axle), of a chariot (yāna). (See the Manubhāṣya, verse 8.291-292)

Source: Wisdom Library: Dharma-śāstra
Dharmashastra book cover
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Dharmashastra (धर्मशास्त्र, dharmaśāstra) contains the instructions (shastra) regarding religious conduct of livelihood (dharma), ceremonies, jurisprudence (study of law) and more. It is categorized as smriti, an important and authoritative selection of books dealing with the Hindu lifestyle.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

1) Akṣa (अक्ष).—(Akṣakumāra). Genealogy. Descended in order from Viṣṇu as follows: Brahmā-Pulastya-Viśravas-Rāvaṇa-Akṣa. (Uttararāmāyaṇa). Birth. Three sons were born to Rāvaṇa, King of the demons, by his wife Mandodarī. They were Meghanāda, Atikāya and Akṣakumāra. Akṣakumāra was a redoubtable hero and a fierce fighter but was killed by Hanūmān in Laṅkā. (Sarga 47, Sundara Kāṇḍa, Vālmīki Rāmāyaṇa). (See full article at Story of Akṣa from the Puranic encyclopaedia by Vettam Mani)

2) Akṣa (अक्ष).—We find another warrior of this name among the soldiers who came to help Skanda in the Kaurava-Pāṇḍava battle. (Śloka 58, Chapter 45, Śalya Parva, Mahābhārata).

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopaedia

1a) Akṣa (अक्ष).—The game of dice. Ṛtuparṇa, an expert in it Taught the game to Nala; to be avoided by a king.

1b) A dānava.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 6. 11.

1c) A son of Satyabhāmā and Kṛṣṇa.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 71. 247; Vāyu-purāṇa 96. 238.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

Akṣa (अक्ष).—Latitude - The term akṣa is an abbreviation of the complete term, akṣonnati, meaning the inclination of the Earth's axis to the plane of the celestial horizon, i.e., the latitude of the place. Note: Akṣa is a Sanskrit technical term used in ancient Indian sciences such as Astronomy, Mathematics and Geometry.

Source: Wikibooks (hi): Sanskrit Technical Terms
Jyotisha book cover
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Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Akṣa (अक्ष) is the name of the caitya-tree under which the parents of Puṣpadanta are often depicted in Jaina iconography, according to the Digambara tradition. According to the Śvetāmbara tradition the tree is known as Mali. The term caitya refers to “sacred shrine”, an important place of pelgrimage and meditation in Jainism. Sculptures with such caitya-trees generally shows a male and a female couple seated under a tree with the female having a child on her lap. Usually there is a seated Jina figure on top of the tree.

Puṣpadanta is the ninth of twenty-four tīrthaṅkaras: enlightened beings who, having conquered saṃsāra (cycle of birth and death), leave a path behind for others to follow. His father is Sugrīva and his mother is Rāmā, according to the Ācāradinakara (14th century work on Jain conduct written by Vardhamāna Sūri).

Source: Wisdom Library: Jainism
General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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India history and geogprahy

Akṣa.—same as suvarṇa (q. v.). Note: akṣa is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

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Akṣa.—same as suvarṇa (q. v.). Note: akṣa is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary
India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

akṣa (अक्ष).—m (S) A die for playing with. 2 Axis, axle. 3 A seed used for rosaries, Elæocarpus. 4 Terrestrial latitude.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

akṣa (अक्ष).—m A die. Axis. A seed used for ro- saries. Terrestrial latitude.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Akṣa (अक्ष).—m.

(-kṣaḥ) 1. A die, cubic or oblong, for playing with. 2. Part of a car. 3. A wheel. 4. A car. 5. A snake. 6. Law suit, legal proceedings 7. Sacred knowledge, 8. The soul. 9. A seed of which Rosaries are made, in which sense it occurs mostly in composition, as, Rudraksha, Indraksha. 10, A Karsha or weight of sixteen mashas. 11. A tree bearing a medicinal fruit. (Terminalia belerica.) 12. A proper name, the son of Ravana. 13. A name of Gadura. 14. A person born blind. 15. Terrestrial latitude. n.

(-kṣaṃ) 1. An organ of sense. 2. Sea, salt. 3. Blue vitriol E. aśu to pervade, Unadi affix sa.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary
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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 164 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Lohitaksha
Lohitākṣa (लोहिताक्ष).—red-eye, (1) (n. of a gem, not in Sanskrit dictionaries, but occurs in P...
Virupaksha
Virūpākṣa (विरूपाक्ष) is the name of a Yakṣa who, due to Kubera’s curse, was born on the earth ...
Akshamala
Akṣamālā (अक्षमाला, “prayer beads”) refers to one of the several “attributes” (āyudha) or “acce...
Hiranyaksha
Hiraṇyākṣa (हिरण्याक्ष).—m. (-kṣaḥ) The name of a demon, killed by Vishnu. E. hiraṇya, and akṣa...
Gavaksha
Gavākṣa (गवाक्ष).—m. (-kṣaḥ) 1. An air hole, a loop hole, a round window, a bull’s eye, &c....
Ekaksha
Ekākṣa (एकाक्ष).—mfn. (-kṣaḥ-kṣā-kṣaṃ) One-eyed. m. (-kṣaḥ) A crow. E. eka and akṣi an eye.
Vishalaksha
Viśālākṣa (विशालाक्ष).—(1) n. of a disciple of Buddha: Mv i.183.1; (2) n. of a yakṣa: Māy 51.
Pundarikaksha
Puṇḍarīkākṣa (पुण्डरीकाक्ष).—an epithet of Viṣṇu; यं पुण्डरीकाक्षमिव श्रिता श्रीः (yaṃ puṇḍarīk...
Pingaksha
Piṅgākṣa (पिङ्गाक्ष).—mfn. (-kṣaḥ-kṣī-kṣaṃ) Red-eyed. m. (kṣaḥ) A name of Siva. E. piṅga reddis...
Rudraksha
Rudrākṣa (रुद्राक्ष).—(Elaco Carpus seeds) Beads for rosaries. General information. A holy thin...
Raktaksha
Raktākṣa (रक्ताक्ष).—mfn. (-kṣaḥ-kṣī-kṣa) Red-eyed. m. (-kṣaḥ) 1. A buffalo. 2. A pigeon. 3. Th...
Tryaksha
Tryakṣa (त्र्यक्ष).—An ancient place of habitation. When the King of this place went to see Dha...
Akshamsha
Akṣāṃśa (अक्षांश).—m. (-śaḥ) A degree of latitude. E. akṣa and aṃśa a part.
Pushkaraksha
Puṣkarākṣa (पुष्कराक्ष) is the son of king Bhadrākṣa from Takṣaśilā, according to the Kathāsari...
Sahasraksha
Sahasrākṣa (सहस्राक्ष) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. XIV.8.16, XIV.8) and repres...

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