Diva, Divā: 15 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Diva means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, the history of ancient India, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Diva (दिव).—Heaven; see also Suvarlokam; presiding deity is Sūrya, who is therefore known as Divaspati; here live Gandharvas, Rākṣasas, Apsarasas, Yakṣas, Nāgas, and men; five-fold route to, from Pātālam; equal to earth in measurement of rotation or border.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 2. 32; 124. 20. Vāyu-purāṇa 47. 9; 101. 19.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Diva.—(CII 3, etc.), abbreviation of divasa or divase; used to denote the solar or, more properly, civil day. Note: diva is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

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Divā.—(CII 3), ‘by day’; an indeclinable used in some of the Nepal inscriptions in composition with words denoting tithis or lunar days. Note: divā is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

diva : (m.) heaven.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Divā, (adv.) (Ved. divā, cp. diva) by day S.I, 183; M.I, 125; Dh.387; DA.I, 251; PvA.43, 142, 206 (=divasa-bhāge). Often combined & contrasted with rattiṃ (or ratto) by night; e.g. divārattiṃ by day & by night S.I, 47; divā c’eva rattiñ ca D.II, 20; rattim pi divā pi J.II, 133; divā ca ratto ca S.I, 33; Sn.223; Dh.296; Vv 314; VvA.128.—divātaraṃ (compar. adv.) later on in the day M.I, 125; J.III, 48, 498.—atidivā too late S.I, 200; A.III, 117.

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Diva, (Sk. diva (nt.), weak base diǔ (div) of strong form dē (see deva) to *deịeǔo to shine; cp. Sk. dyo heaven, divā adv. by day; Lat. biduum (bi-divom) two days) (a) heaven J.IV, 134 (°ṃ agā); V, 123 (°ṃ patta); PvA.74 (°ṃ gata).—(b) day Sn.507 (rattindivaṃ night & day); VvA.247 (rattindiva one night & one day, i.e. 24 hrs.); DhA.II, 8 (divā-divassa so early in the day). Also in divaṃ-kara, daymaker, =sun, VvA.307; usually as divākara (q. v.). Cp. devasika; see also ajja.

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

divā (दिवा).—m (dīpa S) A lamp; a light with oil and a wick. Pr. gharānta divā tara dēvaḷānta divā Charity begins at home. Pr. divyākhālīṃ andhāra Every good man has some blemish. 2 An iron stick curved back at one end to be hooked up, and spreading at the other into a receptacle for oil and a wick. 3 A stick or stand gen. for a lamp; though usually it takes a prefix of lāmhaṇa, rōmaṇa &c. 4 The flour lampstand in marriages. 5 A common term for those days of the month Wyshakh on which the first five nakshatras occur. 6 A preparation of rice-flour in the form of a saucer: made and eaten on occasions. divā lāgata nāhīṃ (tyā dēśānta &c.) Phrase expressive of utter desolation and wildness (of a country &c.) divā lāvaṇēṃ To become notorious; to acquire celebrity (esp. for evil deeds). divā sarasā karaṇēṃ To bring near (to its proper spot in its groove) by pulling out or forwards the wick of a samaī, in order to brighten or trim it. divyānēṃ divasa kāḍhaṇēṃ-ujēḍaṇēṃ To wake all the night. divyānēṃ (rātra or divasa) kāḍhaṇēṃ or lōṭaṇēṃ To have a light burning (all the night or all the day): i.e. to be in extreme sickness. divyāvātīnēṃ śōdhaṇēṃ To search closely; to explore every nook and corner, chink and crevice. divyāsa nirōpa dēṇēṃ-padara dēṇēṃ-phūla dēṇēṃ To extinguish the lamp.

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divā (दिवा).—ad S By day; in the day time.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

divā (दिवा).—m A lamp; a stand for a lamp. ad By day. gharānta divā tara dēvaḷānta divā Charity begins at home. divā lāgata nāhīṃ (tyā dēśānta &c.) A phrase expressive of utter de- solation and wildness (of a country &c.) divā lāvaṇēṃ Acquire celebrity (for evil deeds), become notorious. divyākhā- lī andhāra Every good man has some blemish. divyānēṃ divasa kāḍhaṇēṃ-ujaḍaṇēṃ Wake all the night. divyānēṃ (rātra or divasa) kāḍhaṇēṃ To have a light burning (all the night or all the day), to be in extreme ill ness. divyāvātīnēṃ śōdhaṇēṃ To search close, to explore every nook and corner. divyāsa nirōpa dēṇēṃ-padara dēṇēṃ To extinguish the lamp.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Diva (दिव).—[dīvyatyatra ghañarthe ādhāre ka]

1) Heaven.

2) The sky; see दिव् (div); दिवं ते शिरसा व्याप्तम् (divaṃ te śirasā vyāptam) Mb.12.47.88.

3) A day.

4) A forest, wood, thicket.

Derivable forms: divam (दिवम्).

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Divā (दिवा).—ind. By day, in the daytime; दिवाभू (divābhū) 'to become day'.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Diva (दिव).—n.

(-vaṃ) 1. Heaven, paradise. 2. Heaven, sky, atmosphere. 3. A day. 4. A wood, a thicket. E. div to play, to shine, &c. affix ghañarthe ādhāre vā kaḥ see the preceding.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Diva (दिव).—[div + a] 1., n. 1. Heaven, Mahābhārata 3, 11746.

— Cf. tri-, n. Heaven (perhaps properly the third, the most holy heaven), [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 9, 253.

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Divā (दिवा).—[div + ā], originally instr. of div, adv. 1. By day, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 4, 50.

— Cf. [Latin] diu, du-dum, and divātana.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Diva (दिव).—[neuter] heaven, day; dive dive day by day.

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Divā (दिवा).—([instrumental] [adverb]) by day.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Diva (दिव):—[from div] n. heaven, sky, [Mahābhārata; Harivaṃśa]

2) [v.s. ...] day, [especially] in dive-dive, day by day, daily, [Ṛg-veda] and ifc. ([gana] śaradādi)

3) [v.s. ...] wood, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] cf. ahar-, tri-, naktaṃ-, naktaṃ-bṛhad-. rātrim-, su-; cf. also διϝο Fo in ἐν-διος [Latin] (?) biduum.

5) Divā (दिवा):—[from div] ind. (for divā, [instrumental case] of 3. div) [gana] svarādi, by day (often opposed to naktam), [Ṛg-veda]

6) [v.s. ...] used also as [substantive] e.g. divā bhavati, [Chāndogya-upaniṣad iii, 11, 3]

7) [v.s. ...] (with rātris), [Mahābhārata ii, 154 etc.]

8) [v.s. ...] [especially] in beginning of [compound]

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Böhtlingk and Roth Grosses Petersburger Wörterbuch

Diva (दिव):—n.

1) = 3. div a) oxyt. Himmel (Luftraum) [UJJVAL.] zu [Uṇādisūtra 1, 156.] [Trikāṇḍaśeṣa 1, 1, 4.] [Hemacandra’s Abhidhānacintāmaṇi 87,] [Scholiast] [Hemacandra’s Anekārthasaṃgraha 2, 525.] [Medinīkoṣa v. 11.] taiścaturbhirmaheṣvāsairgiriśṛṅgamaśobhata . lokapālairmahābhāgairdivaṃ devavarairiva .. [Mahābhārata 3, 11746. 14, 797.] [Harivaṃśa 5106.] divonmukha [Varāhamihira’s Bṛhajjātaka S. 27,c,10.] — b) Tag [Hemacandra’s Abhidhānacintāmaṇi 138.] — Häufig am Ende von compp. gaṇa śaradādi zu [Pāṇini’s acht Bücher 5, 4, 107.] [Vopadeva’s Grammatik 6, 62]; vgl. ahardiva, tri, naktaṃ, bṛhaddiva, rātriṃ, su . —

2) = vana Wald [Hemacandra’s Anekārthasaṃgraha]

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Divā (दिवा):—(instr. von div mit nicht vorgeschobenem Tone) ved., divā gaṇa svarādi zu [Pāṇini’s acht Bücher 1, 1, 37.] adv. am Tage [Amarakoṣa 3, 5, 6.] [Hemacandra’s Abhidhānacintāmaṇi 1531.] divā, naktam [Ṛgveda 1, 34, 2. 98, 2. 139, 5. 7, 15, 15. 140, 11 u.s.w.] [Atharvavedasaṃhitā 5, 7, 3. 29, 9.] sāyam, prātaḥ, rātryā, divā [11, 2, 16.] [The Śatapathabrāhmaṇa 2, 1, 4, 1. 11, 5, 1, 4. 14, 1, 2, 21.] [Praśnopaniṣad 1, 13.] [ĀŚV. GṚHY. 1, 2. 22.] [Manu’s Gesetzbuch 2, 102. 4, 50. 102. 106. 6, 19.] [Nalopākhyāna 2, 4.] [Sāvitryupākhyāna 5, 83.] [Rāmāyaṇa 4, 43, 45.] [Suśruta 1, 113, 16. 316, 5.] [Śākuntala 102.] [Kathāsaritsāgara 7, 32.] [Bhāgavatapurāṇa 1, 16, 10.] divārātram [Manu’s Gesetzbuch 5, 80.] [Mahābhārata 3, 12540. 16, 38.] [Rāmāyaṇa 1, 58, 12.] divāniśam [Manu’s Gesetzbuch 7, 44. 9, 2.] [Nalopākhyāna 13, 37. 20, 28.] [Raghuvaṃśa 19, 6.] adivā nicht bei Tage [Aitareyabrāhmaṇa 5, 31.] Das adv. als subj. an Stelle des nom. sg.: sarvamasmai divā bhavati [Pañcaviṃśabrāhmaṇa 5, 8, 9. 11, 1, 11.] sakṛddivā haivāsmai bhavati [Chāndogyopaniṣad 3, 11, 3.] kṣaṇā lavā muhūrtāśca divā rātristathaiva ca [Mahābhārata 2, 454.] tato nājñāyata tadā divārātraṃ tathā diśaḥ [3, 816.] [Bhāgavatapurāṇa 5, 22, 5.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Sanskrit-Wörterbuch in kürzerer Fassung

Diva (दिव):—n.

1) der Himmel.

2) Tag. Nur in der Verbindung divodive Tag für Tag , täglich.

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Divā (दिवा):—Adv. am Tage. Nicht selten als Subject (184 ,

25) oder am Anf. eines Comp. so v.a. Tag im Gegensatz zur Nacht.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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