Anubhavana, Anubhāvana: 11 definitions

Introduction:

Anubhavana means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, the history of ancient India, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Anubhavana in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Anubhāvana (अनुभावन) refers to “moulding” [?], according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.22 (“Description of Pārvatī’s penance”).—Accordingly, as Pārvatī thought to herself: “[...] In the Śāstras and the Vedas, lord Śiva is always sung in praise by the sages as the bestower of welfare, omniscient, all-pervading and all-seer. The lord is the bestower of all riches, the moulder of fine emotions [i.e., sarvabhāva-anubhāvana], the bestower of the desires of devotees and the remover of their distress. If I am devoted to the bull-bannered lord, discarding all desires, may He be pleased with me. [...]”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Anubhavana.—(IA 18), ‘the time or period of office [of a person]’. Note: anubhavana is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Anubhavana in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

anubhavana : (nt.) experiencing of; undergoing; eating.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Anubhavana, (nt.) (fr. anubhavati) experiencing, suffering; sensation or physical sensibility (cf. Cpd. 229, 2321) Nett 28 (iṭṭhâniṭṭh-ânubhavana-lakkhanā vedanā “feeling is characterised by the experiencing of what is pleasant and unpleasant”); Miln.60 (vedayita-lakkhaṇā vedanā anubhavana-lakkhaṇā ca); PvA.152 (kamma-vipāka°). Esp. in combn. with dukkha° suffering painful sensations, e.g. at J.IV, 3; Miln.181; DhA.IV, 75; PvA.52. (Page 40)

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Anubhavana in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Anubhāvana (अनुभावन).—Indication of feelings by signs, gestures &c.

Derivable forms: anubhāvanam (अनुभावनम्).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Anubhāvana (अनुभावन):—[=anu-bhāvana] [from anu-bhū] n. the act of indicating feelings by sign or gesture, [Sāhitya-darpaṇa]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Goldstücker Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Anubhāvana (अनुभावन):—[tatpurusha compound] n.

(-nam) (In rhetoric.) Representing feel-ings so as to make then the characteristic (śṛṅgāra &c. see rasa and anubhāva) of a poetical composition. E. bhū, in the caus., with anu, kṛt aff. lyuṭ.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Anubhavana (अनुभवन) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Aṇubhavaṇa, Aṇuhavaṇa.

[Sanskrit to German]

Anubhavana in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Anubhavana in Prakrit glossary
Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Aṇubhavaṇa (अणुभवण) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Anubhavana.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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