Vanda, Vaṇḍā, Vaṇḍa, Vandā, Vamda: 13 definitions

Introduction:

Vanda means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Wisdom Library: Local Names of Plants and Drugs

Vanda [वांदा] in the Hindi language is the name of a plant identified with Vanda tessellata (Roxb.) Hook. ex G.Don from the Orchidaceae (Orchid) family having the following synonyms: Epidendrum tessellatum, Vanda roxburghii, Cymbidium tessellatum. For the possible medicinal usage of vanda, you can check this page for potential sources and references, although be aware that any some or none of the side-effects may not be mentioned here, wether they be harmful or beneficial to health.

Vanda [वंदा] in the Marathi language is the name of a plant identified with Dendrophthoe falcata (L.fil.) Bl. from the Loranthaceae (Mistletoe) family having the following synonyms: Loranthus loniceroides, Loranthus falcatus, Loranthus indicus Desr..

Vanda [वंदा] in the Marathi language is the name of a plant identified with Dendrophthoe falcata var. coccinea (Talbot) Santapau from the Loranthaceae (Mistletoe) family.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

vaṇḍā (वंडा).—m (Better ōṇḍā) A small and smooth log or billet. 2 A cylindrical piece of timber; a piece of the trunk of a tree. 3 fig. A barren woman or female animal.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

vaṇḍā (वंडा).—m vaṇḍakī f-kēṃ n (Better ōṇḍā). A small and smooth log. Fig. A barren woman or female animal.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Vaṇḍa (वण्ड).—a.

1) Maimed, crippled.

2) Unmarried.

3) Emasculated.

-ṇḍaḥ 1 A man who is circumcised or has no prepuce.

2) An ox without a tail.

-ṇḍā An unchaste woman; cf. रण्डा (raṇḍā).

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Vandā (वन्दा).—

1) A female beggar.

2) Parasitical plant (vandākaḥ, -kī, -kā, -vandāraḥ also in this sense).

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Vanda (वन्द).—[vand-rak Uṇādi-sūtra 2.13] A worshipper, votary.

-ndam Prosperity.

Derivable forms: vandaḥ (वन्दः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Vandā (वन्दा).—(?) (sc. lipi), a kind of writing: mss. at Mahāvastu i.135.7 (Senart vaṅgā by em., with Lalitavistara 125.20).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vaṇḍa (वण्ड).—mfn.

(-ṇḍaḥ-ṇḍā-ṇḍaṃ) 1. Maimed, defective, crippled, but especially in the hands. 2. Unmarried. 3. Impotent, emasculated. m.

(-ṇḍaḥ) 1. A man who is circumcised or has no prepuce. 2. An ox without his tail. f.

(-ṇḍā) An unchaste woman. E. vaṇ to sound, &c., aff. ḍa .

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Vandā (वन्दा).—f.

(-ndā) 1. A parasite plant, (Epidendrum tessellatum, &c.) 2. Any parasite plant. 3. A female beggar. E. vadi to praise, affs. aṅ and ṭāp .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vaṇḍa (वण्ड).—I. adj. (A person) whose hands have been cut off. Ii. f. ḍā, An unchaste woman.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vanda (वन्द).—v. devavanda.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Vanda (वन्द):—[from vand] mfn. praising, extolling (See deva-vanda)

2) Vandā (वन्दा):—[from vanda > vand] a f. See below.

3) [from vand] b f. (only [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]) a parasitical plant ([especially] Epidendrum Tesselatum)

4) [v.s. ...] a female mendicant

5) [v.s. ...] = bandī, a prisoner.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Vaṇḍa (वण्ड):—(ṇḍaḥ) 1. m. A man who is circumcised or has no prepuce; ox without his tail. f. (ṇḍā) Unchaste woman. a. Maimed; impotent.

2) Vandā (वन्दा):—(ndā) 1. f. A parasite plant; female beggar.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Vanda (वन्द) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Vaṃdāva.

[Sanskrit to German]

Vanda in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

1) Vaṃda (वंद) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Vand.

2) Vaṃda (वंद) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Vṛnd.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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