Vamadevya, Vāmadevya: 5 definitions

Introduction:

Vamadevya means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Vamadevya in Purana glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Vāmadevya (वामदेव्य).—A sūkta of the sāma saṃhita recited in tank ritual;1 to be uttered in installing a new image.2

  • 1) Matsya-purāṇa 58. 37.
  • 2) Ib. 265. 27.
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Kavya (poetry)

[«previous next»] — Vamadevya in Kavya glossary
Source: archive.org: Naisadhacarita of Sriharsa

Vāmadevya (वामदेव्य) is the name of a Sāma or Vedic (the cult of which involved promiscuous relations with women), and is mentioned in the Naiṣadha-carita 17.194. The cult or Vrata of the Vāmadeva Sāma is described in Chāndogya-upaniṣad 2.13, which says “na kāñcana pariharet tad[??]tam”. Both Śaṃkara and Ānandagiri take this literally and defend the rite as being prescribed by Śruti. The Vāmadeva cult is personified by Ānandarāyamakhin in his allegorical play Vidyāpariṇayanam, act 5.

Kavya book cover
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Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Vamadevya in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Vāmadevya (वामदेव्य).—(vāmadevena dṛṣṭaṃ sāma iti vāmadevāḍḍyaḍḍyau P.IV. 2.9) The name of a Sāma or Vedic chant, the cult of which involved promiscuous relations with women; एतद्वामदेव्यं मिथुने प्रोतम् (etadvāmadevyaṃ mithune protam) Ch. Up.2.13.1-2; कम्रं तत्रोपनम्राया विश्वस्या वीक्ष्य तुष्टवान् । स मम्लौ तं विभाव्याथ वामदेव्याभ्युपासकम् (kamraṃ tatropanamrāyā viśvasyā vīkṣya tuṣṭavān | sa mamlau taṃ vibhāvyātha vāmadevyābhyupāsakam) || N.17.194. The Vāmadeva cult is personified by Ānandarāyamakhin in his allegorical play Vidyāpariṇayam Act 5-"इष्टाङ्गलक्षितरतिक्रमशोभितैषा, शृङ्गारिणी विजयते धुरि वामदेव्या । हृद्यां च कीर्तिमियमातनुते हि विद्या (iṣṭāṅgalakṣitaratikramaśobhitaiṣā, śṛṅgāriṇī vijayate dhuri vāmadevyā | hṛdyāṃ ca kīrtimiyamātanute hi vidyā) |".

Derivable forms: vāmadevyam (वामदेव्यम्).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Vāmadevya (वामदेव्य):—[=vāma-devya] [from vāma] mfn. coming or descended from the Ṛṣi Vāma-deva, [Śatapatha-brāhmaṇa]

2) [v.s. ...] m. [patronymic] of Aṃho-muc (author of [Ṛg-veda x, 127]), [Anukramaṇikā]

3) [v.s. ...] of Bṛhad-uktha and Mūrdhanvat, [ib.]

4) [v.s. ...] n. Name of various Sāmans, [Ārṣeya-brāhmaṇa]

[Sanskrit to German]

Vamadevya in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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