Ushtha, Uṣṭha: 3 definitions

Introduction:

Ushtha means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Uṣṭha can be transliterated into English as Ustha or Ushtha, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

Uṣṭha (उष्ठ) refers to the “lips”. It is one of the parts of the human body with which gestures (āṅgika) are performaned, according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 8. These gestures form a part of the histrionic representation (abhinaya).

There are six different ‘gestures of the lips’ (uṣṭha) defined:

  1. vivartana (narrowing),
  2. kampana (trembling),
  3. visarga (spreading out),
  4. vinigūhana (concealing),
  5. sandaṣṭaka (biting),
  6. samudgaka (contracting).
Natyashastra book cover
context information

Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (shastra) of performing arts, (natya—theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing Dramatic plays (nataka), construction and performance of Theater, and Poetic works (kavya).

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Uṣṭha (उष्ठ) [=Uṣṭā?] refers to the “lips”, according to the Kularatnoddyota, one of the earliest Kubjikā Tantras.—Accordingly, “That (was) the subtle, supreme visualization. (Now) listen to the gross one with limbs. O Kaulinī, I will tell you without doubt (what it is) as you (yourself) know it (to be). (The gross form has) five faces, ten arms and, pure, it has a smiling face. The face of the goddess is completely full (of light and joy) and she shines with (her) beautiful teeth and lips [i.e., cārudanta-uṣṭha-bhāṣiṇī]. [...]”.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Uṣṭha (उष्ठ) refers to the “lips”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.46 (“The arrival of the bridegroom”).—Accordingly, as Brahmā narrated to Nārada: “[...] In the meantime the servant-maids in the harem of the mountain took Pārvatī out in order to worship the tutelar family deity. [...] With diamond earrings her cheeks appeared brilliant. Her rows of teeth sparkled like diamonds. Red lac applied over her lips (uṣṭha) which were naturally red like Bimba fruits was exquisite. [...]”.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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