Angushtha, Aṅguṣṭha, Amgushtha: 18 definitions

Introduction:

Angushtha means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Aṅguṣṭha can be transliterated into English as Angustha or Angushtha, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Yoga (school of philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Angushtha in Yoga glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Yoga

Aṅguṣṭha (अङ्गुष्ठ) is a Sanskrit word referring to the “thumb”. It is used in Yoga.

Source: Google Books: Croaking Frogs: (Yoga)

Aṅguṣṭha (अङ्गुष्ठ) refers to the “big toes” representing one of the sixteen vital centres of the body (i.e., ādhāra), according to the Jyotsnā 3.73 (Cf. Gorakṣaśataka 14 and Svātmārāma’s Haṭhapradīpikā 3.72).—In Haṭhayoga, ādhāra refers to a vital point of the body, a seat of vital function. Jyotsnā verse 3.73 cites a passage attributed to Gorakṣa listing the ādhāras as [e.g., aṅguṣṭha (big toes), ...]. The Haṭhapradīpikā refers to sixteen ādhāras but does not name them or explain what they are. The Gorakṣaśataka also refers to sixteen ādhāras as something the Yogī should be familiar with, but does not name them.

Yoga book cover
context information

Yoga is originally considered a branch of Hindu philosophy (astika), but both ancient and modern Yoga combine the physical, mental and spiritual. Yoga teaches various physical techniques also known as āsanas (postures), used for various purposes (eg., meditation, contemplation, relaxation).

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Angushtha in Purana glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Aṅguṣṭha (अङ्गुष्ठ).—Gifts, receiving of gifts, homa, feeding, bali offering, all to be done.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 79. 88.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Angushtha in Shaivism glossary
Source: academia.edu: The Śaiva Yogas and Their Relation to Other Systems of Yoga

Aṅguṣṭha (अङ्गुष्ठ, “big toes”) refers to one of the sixteen types of “locus” or “support” (ādhāra) according to the Netratantra. These ādhāras are called so because they “support” or “localise” the self and are commonly identified as places where breath may be retained. They are taught in two different setups: according to the tantraprakriyā and according to the kulaprakriyā. Aṅguṣṭha belongs to the latter system.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Angushtha in Shaktism glossary
Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Aṅguṣṭha (अङ्गुष्ठ) refers to the “thumbs”, according to the Śrīmatottara-tantra, an expansion of the Kubjikāmatatantra: the earliest popular and most authoritative Tantra of the Kubjikā cult.—Accordingly, as Bhairava explains: “[...] By squeezing where the channels that transport the vital breath (are located), (with) the two thumbs [i.e., aṅguṣṭha—aṅguṣṭhau dvau] consecrated with mantra, it [i.e., parāśakti—the supreme energy] heats up and (then) burns up the cage of sin. The mind attains the transmental state and (the disciple) falls on the ground unconscious”.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Angushtha in Marathi glossary
Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

aṅguṣṭha (अंगुष्ठ).—m (S) A thumb or a great toe. aṅguṣṭhācī āga mastakānta jāṇēṃ g. of s. To be filled with fury; to be in a blaze from the great toe to the crown of the head. aṅguṣṭhāvaruna daśaśira karaṇēṃ (To make Rava&n2dot;a out of a thumb.) To tell the whole from seeing a small part. To deal in hyperbole or exaggeration. Also aṅguṣṭhāvaruna daśaśira karaṇārā. An exaggerator &c.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

aṅguṣṭha (अंगुष्ठ).—m A thumb or a great toe.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Angushtha in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Aṅguṣṭha (अङ्गुष्ठ).—[aṅgau pāṇau prādhānyena tiṣṭhati; aṅgu-sthā P.VIII. 4.97]

1) The thumb; great toe.

2) A thumb's breadth, usually regarded as equal to अङ्गुल (aṅgula) [cf. Zend angusta, Pers. angust.]

Derivable forms: aṅguṣṭhaḥ (अङ्गुष्ठः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Aṅguṣṭha (अङ्गुष्ठ).—m.

(-ṣṭhaḥ) The thumb. E. aṅgu here said to be the hand, and ṣṭha, from sthā to stay.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Aṅguṣṭha (अङ्गुष्ठ).—i. e. aṅgu-stha (cf. aṅgula), m. 1. The thumb. 2. The great toe. 3. A thumb’s breadth as a measure.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Aṅguṣṭha (अङ्गुष्ठ).—[masculine] thumb or great toe; aṅguṣṭhamātra & aṅguṣṭhamātraka [adjective] having the length of a thumb.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Aṅguṣṭha (अङ्गुष्ठ):—[from aṅgula] m. the thumb

2) [v.s. ...] the great toe

3) [v.s. ...] a thumb’s breadth, usually regarded as equal to an aṅgula.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Goldstücker Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Aṅguṣṭha (अङ्गुष्ठ):—[tatpurusha compound] m.

(-ṣṭhaḥ) 1) The thumb.

2) The great toe.

3) A thumb’s breadth, as a linear measure which is said to be a measure of six barley corns. This seems, however, not to be correct, because twelve aṅguṣṭhas are given by the same authority as equal to a Vitasti or span. See aṅgula. E. aṅgu here said to mean the hand, and stha.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Aṅguṣṭha (अङ्गुष्ठ):—(ṣṭhaḥ) 1. m. The thumb.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Aṅguṣṭha (अङ्गुष्ठ) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Aṃguṭhṭha.

[Sanskrit to German]

Angushtha in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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