Svananda, Svānanda, Sva-ananda: 8 definitions

Introduction:

Svananda means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Svānanda (स्वानन्द) refers to “one’s own (innate) bliss”, according to the Jayadrathayāmala: one of the earliest and most extensive Tantric sources of the Kālīkrama system.—Accordingly, as Bhairava teaches the Goddess about his inner state: “[...] There in the centre [i.e., within the foundation], O daughter of the mountains, is the supreme light between the two, being and nonbeing. Within that centre my (energy) abides in accord with (her supreme) state of being. (She is) Kālī who generates (kalanī) time, she who is the cause of cogitation (kalpanā). Then that supreme goddess who devours time issued forth, absorbed in the bliss of her own (innate) bliss [i.e., svānanda-ānanda-saṃlīnā], powerful with the contemplation of (her) own nature. Established on the plane of consciousness and the unconscious, she is between the plane of consciousness and the unconscious. (She is) the goddess who is the Great Void, the Transmental who devours time”.—(cf. Kandacakra)

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Svananda in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Svānanda (स्वानन्द) refers to “one who is self-bliss” and is used to describe Śiva, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.5.6 (“Prayer to Śiva”).—Accordingly, as the Gods eulogized Śiva: “Obeisance to you, the soul of all, obeisance to Śiva the remover of distress, obeisance to the blue-necked Rudra, obeisance to the knowledge-formed Śiva of great mind. You are our ultimate goal for ever. You are the remover of all adversities. O destroyer of the enemies of the gods, you alone are to be respected by us always. You are the beginning. You are the primordial being. You are self-bliss (svānanda). You are the everlasting lord. You are the lord of the universe, the direct creator of Prakṛti and Puruṣa. [...]”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: OSU Press: Cakrasamvara Samadhi

Svānanda (स्वानन्द) refers to “one’s own bliss”, according to the Ṭīkā Pot Worship [i.e., Kalaśapūjā] ritual often performed in combination with the Cakrasaṃvara Samādhi, which refers to the primary pūjā and sādhanā practice of Newah Mahāyāna-Vajrayāna Buddhists in Nepal.—Accordingly, “Rising out across the circle, that kindles the wind, of a hundred shining suns, A burning triad, infatuating the three worlds, an overflowing stream of nectar, Giving her own abundant bliss (svānanda-saṃdohadā), having the pure essence of Buddha knowledge, Free from traversing existence and non-existence, beloved sow, drink to you”.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

svānanda (स्वानंद).—a S svānandasōhaḷā a (Poetry.) Joying in one's own joy; rejoicing in self. A title of Brahm or the deity. Also svānandabharita a Filled with (or realizing) one's proper or peculiar joy. Ex. tujhīṃ aikōni vacanāmṛtēṃ || brahmā jhālā svānanda bharita ||.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

svānanda (स्वानंद).—a Rejoicing in self.

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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Svānanda (स्वानन्द).—delight in one's self.

Derivable forms: svānandaḥ (स्वानन्दः).

Svānanda is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms sva and ānanda (आनन्द).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Svānanda (स्वानन्द):—[from sva] m. delight in one’s self, [Catalogue(s)]

[Sanskrit to German]

Svananda in German

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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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