Shantikara, aka: Śāntikara, Shanti-kara; 3 Definition(s)

Introduction

Shantikara means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Śāntikara can be transliterated into English as Santikara or Shantikara, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Katha (narrative stories)

Shantikara in Katha glossary... « previous · [S] · next »

Śāntikara (शान्तिकर) is one of the two sons of Agnidatta: a Brāhman from the Mālava country, having two sons, Śaṅkaradatta and the other Śāntikara, according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 21. Their story is told by Piṅgalikā (a Brāhman woman) to Vāsavadattā in order to relate her history. Vāsavadattā is the queen-wife of Udayana (king of Vatsa).

The Kathāsaritsāgara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Śāntikara, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravāhanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyādharas (celestial beings). The work is said to have been an adaptation of Guṇāḍhya’s Bṛhatkathā consisting of 100,000 verses, which in turn is part of a larger work containing 700,000 verses.

Source: Wisdom Library: Kathāsaritsāgara
Katha book cover
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Katha (कथा, kathā) refers to narrative Sanskrit literature often inspired from epic legendry (itihasa) and poetry (mahākāvya). Some Kathas reflect socio-political instructions for the King while others remind the reader of important historical event and exploits of the Gods, Heroes and Sages.

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India history and geogprahy

Śāntikāra.—(SITI), a temple priest; also known as Śāntiy- aḍigal and Śānti-śeyyān. Note: śāntikāra is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary
India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Shantikara in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [S] · next »

Śāntikara (शान्तिकर).—a. soothing, pacifying.

Śāntikara is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms śānti and kara (कर). See also (synonyms): śāntikārin.

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 2729 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Shankara
Śaṅkara (शङ्कर).—mfn. (-raḥ-rā-raṃ) Auspicious, propitious, conferring happiness or good fortun...
Shanti
Śānti (शान्ति) or Śāntika refers to “expelling evil” which is accomplished by performing mantra...
Alamkara
Alaṃkāra (अलंकार) refers to “decoration of the liṅga”, representing a certain ceremony to be pe...
Karavira
Karavīra (करवीर).—m. (-raḥ) 1. A fragrant plant, (Oleander or Nerium odorum.) 2. The name of a ...
Karakara
Kārakara (कारकर).—mfn. (-raḥ-rī-raṃ) Working, doing work, acting as agent. E. kāra, and kara wh...
Kara
Kara (कर).—mfn. (-raḥ-rā-rī-raṃ) Who or what does, makes or causes, as kiṅkaraḥ a servant, who ...
Prabhakara
Prabhākara (प्रभाकर).—m. (-raḥ) 1. The sun. 2. Fire. 3. The moon. 4. The ocean. 5. An epithet o...
Ratnakara
1) Ratnākara (रत्नाकर) is the name of an ancient city, according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapt...
Rathakara
Rathakāra.—(SITI), artisan classes; also their association. Note: rathakāra is defined in the “...
Sukara
Sūkara (सूकर, “pig”) represents an incarnation destination of the tiryaggati (animal realm) acc...
Andhakara
Andhakāra (अन्धकार).—mn. (-raḥ-raṃ) Darkness. E. andha blind, and kāra what makes.
Shrikara
Śrīkāra (श्रीकार).—m. or nt. (compare Sanskrit Lex. śrīkara, nt., the red lotus, Trik., which u...
Malakara
Mālākāra (मालाकार).—m. (-raḥ) A flower-seller, a florist, a gardener. E. mālā a garland, and kā...
Manasikara
Manasikāra (मनसिकार).—m. (= Pali id.; to prec.; also manasī-, manas-kāra, qq.v.), fixing in min...
Gunakara
Guṇakāra (गुणकार).—mfn. (-raḥ-rī-raṃ) Who counts, &c. m. (-raḥ) A name of Bhimasena E. guṇa...

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