Lata, aka: Lāṭa, Latā; 23 Definition(s)

Introduction

Lata means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Latā (लता) refers to a gesture (āṅgika) made with ‘dance hands’ (nṛttahasta), according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 8. (Instructions): “The two hands to be obliquely stretched sideways. The Dance-hands are to be used in forming Karaṇas”. The hands (hasta) form a part of the human body which represents one of the six major limbs (aṅga) used in dramatic performance. With these limbs are made the various gestures (āṅgika) (eg., Latā), which form a part of the histrionic representation (abhinaya).

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

1) One of the saṃyutta-hastāni (Twenty-six combined Hands).—Latā (creeper): Patāka hands held like a swing. Patron deity Śakti. Usage: being heavy with drink, beginning (the dance called) svabhāva-naṭana, lines, state of union (yoga-condition), etc.

2) Latā is one of the saṃyutta-hastāni (Twenty-seven combined Hands).

Source: archive.org: The mirror of gesture (abhinaya-darpana)
Natyashastra book cover
context information

Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Ayurveda (science of life)

1) Latā (लता, “creeper”).—One the classifications of plants according to their stature. Latās are plants such as Kuṣmāṇḍa (Beninkasa cerifera, Cucurbita hispida, Benincasa hispida) and the like. The term is used throughout Āyurvedic literature such as the Suśruta-saṃhitā and the Caraka-saṃhitā

Latā is listed as a classification for plants in the following sources:

 - Praśastapādabhāṣya by Praśastapāda and its two commentaries Nyāyakaṇḍalī and Kiraṇāvalī.
 - Bhāvārthadīpikā 3.10.19 (commentary on the Bhāgavatapurāṇa) by Śrīdhara.

2) Latā (लता) is a synonym for Priyaṅgu, which is a Sanskrit name for a medicinal plant (Callicarpa macrophylla). It is a technical term used throughout Āyurvedic literature such as the Caraka-saṃhitā and the Suśruta-saṃhitā. This synonym was identified by Amarasiṃha in his Amarakośa (a Sanskrit botanical thesaurus from the 4th century). It is also mentioned as a synonym in the Bhāvaprakāśa-nighaṇṭu (medicinal thesareus) authored by Bhāvamiśra 16th century.

3) Latā (लता) is another name for Mādhavī, which is a Sanskrit word referring to Hiptage benghalensis (hiptage) from the Malpighiaceae family, which is classified as a medicinal plant in the system of Āyurveda (science of Indian medicine). It is used throughout literature such as the Carakasaṃhitā and the Suśrutasaṃhita.

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany

Latā (लता) or Latā refers to a “creeper” (viz., a creeping plant) according to the second chapter (dharaṇyādi-varga) of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu (an Ayurvedic encyclopedia). The Dharaṇyādi-varga covers the lands, soil, mountains, jungles and vegetation’s relations between trees [viz., Latā] and plants and substances, with their various kinds.

Source: Wisdom Library: Raj Nighantu

1) Latā (लता) is another name for Tejovatī, a medicinal plant similar to Jyotiṣmatī Celastrus paniculatus (black oil plant or intellect tree) from the Celastraceae or “staff vine” or “bittersweet family” of flowering plants, according to verse 3.82 of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu. The Raj Nighantu reads Jyotiṣmatī and Tejovatī together while Bāpālāl identifies Tejovatī with Zanthoxylum budrunga (cape yellowwood or Indian ivy-rue) from the Rutaceae or “rue” or “citrus” family. The third chapter (guḍūcyādi-varga) of this book contains climbers and creepers (vīrudh). Together with the names Latā and Tejovatī, there are a total of thirty-one Sanskrit synonyms identified for this plant.

2) Latā (लता) is also mentioned as a synonyme for Kaivartikā, a medicinal plant possibly identified with Ventilago madraspatana (red creeper) from the Rhamnaceae or “buckthorn family” of flowering plants, according to verse 3.120-121. Ṭhākur B.S. et al identify it with either Smilax species or Ventilago species. Nāḍkarṇī suggests Ventilago madraspatana Gaertn. (Rhamnaceae). Even after Nāḍkarṇī’s identification the creeper needs further verification.

Source: WorldCat: Rāj nighaṇṭu
Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Vastushastra (architecture)

Latā (लता) refers to a type of temple (prāsāda) classified under the group named Nigūḍha, according to Samarāṅgaṇasūtradhāra chapter 56. The Nigūḍha group contains five out of a sixty-four total prāsādas (temples) classified under four groups in this chapter. The Samarāṅgaṇasūtradhāra is an 11th-century encyclopedia dealing with various topics from the Vāstuśāstra.

Source: Wisdom Library: Vāstu-śāstra
Vastushastra book cover
context information

Vastushastra (वास्तुशास्त्र, vāstuśāstra) refers to the ancient Indian science (shastra) of architecture (vastu), dealing with topics such architecture, sculpture, town-building, fort building and various other constructions. Vastu also deals with the philosophy of the architectural relation with the cosmic universe.

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Purana

1) Latā (लता).—A celestial maiden. She was the companion of another Devī of name Vargā. Though she became a crocodile by the curse of a brahmin she was set free by Arjuna. (See under Pañcatīrtha).

2) Lāṭa (लाट).—A particular division of the Kṣatriyas. Because a set of the Kṣatriyas showed jealousy towards the Brahmins they became Lāṭas. (Śloka 17, Chapter 35, Anuśāsana Parva).

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopaedia

1a) Latā (लता).—A daughter of Meru and wife of Ilāvṛta.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa V. 2. 23.

1b) A daughter of Irā and mother of Vanaspati.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 7. 460.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Katha (narrative stories)

Lāṭa (लाट).—One of the various countries and cities mentioned by Soḍḍhala.—Lāṭa is southern Gujarat including Khāndeśa or the tract of territory situated between the river Mahī and the lower Narmadā. The limit of Lāṭa is changed from time to time. Laṭamaṇḍala, a unit of the Calukya empire under Jayasiṃha and Kumārapāla is said to be from the Māhi or the Narmadā downward including the com try along the coast and reaching as far as Navsārī or Purṇā. Skandapurāṇa speaks of twenty one thousand villages of Lāṭadeśa.

Rājaśekhara had a partiality for Lāṭa (South Gujarat). According to him it was the crest of the earth. Its people, however hated sanskrit, hut spoke elegant Prākrita in a beautiful way. Its women were noted for their heauty and elegance of speach. Its poets possessed distinctive literary traits and favoured the style called Lāṭi. Humour was its speciality. Vatsarāja of Caulukya Vaṃśa, who patronised Soḍḍhala was the king of the Lāṭadeśa.

Source: Shodhganga: A critical appreciation of soddhalas udayasundarikatha
Katha book cover
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Katha (कथा, kathā) refers to narrative Sanskrit literature often inspired from epic legendry (itihasa) and poetry (mahākāvya). Some Kathas reflect socio-political instructions for the King while others remind the reader of important historical event and exploits of the Gods, Heroes and Sages.

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Kavya (poetry)

Lāṭa (लाट) is the name a locality mentioned in Rājaśekhara’s 10th-century Kāvyamīmāṃsā.—Southern Gujarat including Khāndeśa or the tract of territory situated between the river Māhī and the lower Narmadā.

Source: Shodhganga: The Kavyamimamsa of Rajasekhara
context information

Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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Chandas (prosody, study of Sanskrit metres)

1) Latā (लता) is the name of a Sanskrit metre (chandas) to which Hemacandra (1088-1173 C.E.) assigned the alternative name of Valanā in his auto-commentary on the second chapter of the Chandonuśāsana. Hemacandra gives these alternative names for the metres by other authorities (like Bharata), even though the number of gaṇas or letters do not differ.

2) Latā (लता) refers to one of the 135 metres (chandas) mentioned by Nañjuṇḍa (1794-1868 C.E.) in his Vṛttaratnāvalī. Nañjuṇḍa was a poet of both Kannada and Sanskrit literature flourished in the court of the famous Kṛṣṇarāja Woḍeyar of Mysore. He introduces the names of these metres (eg., Latā) in 20 verses.

Source: Shodhganga: a concise history of Sanskrit Chanda literature
Chandas book cover
context information

Chandas (छन्दस्) refers to Sanskrit prosody and represents one of the six Vedangas (auxiliary disciplines belonging to the study of the Vedas). The science of prosody (chandas-shastra) focusses on the study of the poetic meters such as the commonly known twenty-six metres mentioned by Pingalas.

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Itihasa (narrative history)

Lāṭa (लाट) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. ) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Lāṭa) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places
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Itihasa (इतिहास, itihāsa) refers to ‘epic history’ and represents a branch of Sanskrit literature which popularly includes 1) the eighteen major Puranas, 2) the Mahabharata and 3) the Ramayana. It is a branch of Vedic Hinduism categorised as smriti literature (‘that which is remembered’) as opposed to shruti literature (‘that which is transmitted verbally’).

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General definition (in Hinduism)

latā (लता) f. "a creeper", any creeping or winding plant or twining tendril; Lit. Mn. Lit. MBh. (the brows, arms, curls, a slender body, a sword-blade, lightning are often compared to the form of a creeper, to express their graceful curves and slimness of outline;)

Source: Wisdom Library: Hinduism

Latā (लता)—One of the five Apsarās (beautiful heavenly dancing girls) who were sent by Indra to break the severe austerity of a saintly person called Acyuta ṛṣi.

Source: Wisdom Library: Hinduism

In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

A woman of Savatthi.

She was good and holy, and after death was born as a daughter of Vessavana.

Her sisters were Sajja, Pavara, Acchimati and Suta.

Sakka married them all, and when a dispute arose as to which was the most skilled in dance and song, a contest was held on the banks of the Anotatta, in which Lata won. Suta asked Lata how she acquired her great talents, and the latter gave an account of her good deeds as a human being.

Later, the story was related to Moggallana on one of his visits to the deva worlds, and was repeated by him to the Buddha. Vv.iii.4; VvA.131ff.

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names
context information

Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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India history and geogprahy

Lāṭa (लाट) or Lāṭaviṣaya is a place-name classified as a viṣaya and mentioned in the Gupta inscriptions. The Gupta empire (r. 3rd-century CE), founded by Śrī Gupta, covered much of ancient India and embraced the Dharmic religions such as Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism. The district or viṣaya of Lāṭa is here described as “pleasing with choice trees that are bowed down by the weight of (their) flowers, and with temples and assembly-halls of the gods, and with vihāras, (and) the mountains of which are covered over with vegetation”.

The country south of Mahī or at times south of the Narbadā up to the Pūrva or so far as Daman, was called Lāṭa and ‘it corresponded roughly with Southern Gujarat’. It comprised the collectorates of Surat, Bharoch, Kheda and parts of Baroda territory. Lāṭa is the same as the Larike of Ptolemy which lay to the east of Indo-Scythia along the sea-coast.

The word Lāṭa is derived from Sanskrit Rāṣṭra. The Nāgara brāhmaṇas of Lāṭa (Gujarat) are said to have invented the Nāgarī character which is believed to have been derived from the Brāhmī alphabet.

Source: archive.org: Personal and geographical names in the Gupta inscriptions

Lāṭa (लाट) is mentioned as a country conquered by Aparājita, mentioned in the “Janjirā plates (set I) of Aparājita”. Lāṭa is the ancient name of Southern Gujarāt.

These copper plates (mentioning Lāṭa) were discovered by one Bala Tukaram, while digging in the compound of his house at Chikhala-pākhāḍī, a part of Muruḍ Janjirā in the Kolābā District of the Mahārāṣṭra State.The grant was made on the mahāparvan of the solar eclipse which occurred on Sunday, the fifteenth tithi of the dark fortnight of Śrāvaṇa, when the sun was in the zodiacal sign (rāśi) of Siṃha in the cyclic year Vijaya and the expired Śaka year 915.

Source: What is India: Inscriptions of the Śilāhāras
India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

latā : (f.) a creeper.

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

Latā, (f.) (cp. Sk. latā, connected with Lat. lentus flexible; Ohg. lindi soft, E. lithe; also Ohg. lintea lime tree; Gr. e)lάth fir tree) 1. a slender tree, a creeping plant, creeper A. I, 202 (māluvā°); Vv 355 (=vallī VvA. 162); 474 (kosātakī l.); J. I, 464 (rukkha°, here perhaps better “branch”); DhA. I, 392 (°pasādhana: see under mahā°); Miln. 253, 351; VvA. 12 (kappa°); PvA. 51, 121; Vism. 183 (where the foll. kinds are given: lābu, kumbhaṇḍī, sāmā, kāḷavallī, pūtilatā).—nāga° the iron wood tree: see under nāga; pūti° a sort of creeper (q. v.). On latā in similes see J. P. T. S. 1907, 130.—2. (fig.) an epithet of taṇhā (greed), as much as it strangles its victim Dhs. 1059, 1136; Nett 24, 121.—3. (fig.) streak, flash, in vijjul-latā flash of lightning J. I, 103.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary
Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

1) Laṭa (लट).—f Entangledness (as of hair, yarn, fibres).

laṭa (लट).—m A cudgel or club. Commonly laṭha. 2 f A hair of the pubes.

2) lata (लत).—f ( H) A trick, vice, evil habit. v lāga, paḍa, jaḍa, & mōḍa, suṭa. 2 Blameworthiness or faultiness. v lāva, lāga. Ex. hā āpalyā vacanāsa lata lāvaṇāra nāhīṃ.

3) latā (लता).—f (S) A creeping or climbing plant in general.

4) lāṭa (लाट).—f A wave. 2 The cross piece of a bagāḍa (hook-swing); also of a machine for pounding lime, pohe &c. 3 The roller of an oilmill; also of a certain kind of sugarmill. 4 A beam or rail laid across and before the idol in an idol-house. 5 A roller for leveling ground. 6 The beam of a lime and pebble mill. 7 A large beam or piece of timber in general.

lāṭa (लाट).—interj Bravo! nobly! well-done!

5) lāṭā (लाटा).—m (lāṭaṇēṃ) A pat or mass of dough as prepared to be rolled out into cakes. 2 C A truss (of rice-straw, straw of natsn̤i &c.) 3 (Commonly lāṭaṇī) A rolling pin. In this sense also lāṭhā. lāṭā (also lāṭhā) phiraviṇēṃ (or phiraṇēṃ) To rub over fraudulently or cursorily (bērajāṃvara, hiśōbānta, kāmāvara--an account, a business); to huddle or slubber over.

6) lāta (लात).—f (lattā S through H) A kick. v māra, dē. lāta māraṇēṃ To kick. 2 fig. To throw or kick away in disdain; to spurn (an office &c.; a rōjagāra, kāma, dhandā, anna). lātābukyānīṃ tuḍaviṇēṃ To kick and thump violently. basatāṃ lāta uṭhatāṃ bukī A kick or a cuff at all hours. hā jētha lāta mārīla tēthēṃ pāṇī kāḍhīla Used of a clever all-prevailing fellow.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

1) Lata (लत).—f A trick, vice.

2) latā (लता).—f A creeping plant. latāgṛha n A bower.

3) lāṭa (लाट).—f A wave. The roller of an oil- mill. A large beam. inter j Bravo !

4) lāṭā (लाटा).—m A part or mass of dough as prepared to be rolled out into cakes.

5) lāta (लात) [-tha, -थ].—f A kick. lāta māraṇēṃ Kick. Fig. Throw or kick away in disdain; spurn (an office &c.). lātābukyānnīṃ tuḍaviṇēṃ Kick and thump violently.basatāṃ lāta uṭhatāṃ bukī A kick or a cuff at all hours. hā jēthēṃ lāta mārīla tēthēṃ pāṇī kāḍhīla Used of a clever, all-prevailing fellow.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Laṭa (लट).—

1) A fool, blockhead.

2) A fault, defect.

3) A robber.

Derivable forms: laṭaḥ (लटः).

--- OR ---

Latā (लता).—[lat-ac]

1) A creeper, creeping plant; लताभावेन परिणतमस्या रूपम् (latābhāvena pariṇatamasyā rūpam) V.4; लतेव संनद्धमनोज्ञपल्लवा (lateva saṃnaddhamanojñapallavā) R.3.7 (often used as the last member of compounds, especially with words meaning 'arm', 'eyebrow', 'lightning', to denote beauty, tenderness, thinness &c.; bhujalatā, bāhulatā, bhrūlatā, vidyullatā; so khaḍga°, alaka°, &c.; cf. Ku.2. 64; Me.49; Ś.3.14; R.9.46.

2) A branch; madhusurabhiṇi ṣaṭpadena puṣpe mukha iva śālalatāvadhūścucumbe Ki.1.34; Rām. 2.8.6.

3) The creeper called Priyaṅgu.

4) The Mādhavī creeper.

5) Musk-creeper.

6) A whip or the lash of a whip.

7) A string of pearls.

8) A slender woman.

9) A woman in general.

1) The Dūrvā grass.

--- OR ---

Lāṭa (लाट).—m. pl. Name of a country and its inhabitants; एष च (eṣa ca) (lāṭānuprāsaḥ) प्रायेण लाटजनप्रियत्वाल्लाटानुप्रासः (prāyeṇa lāṭajanapriyatvāllāṭānuprāsaḥ) S. D.1.

-ṭaḥ 1 A king of the Lāṭas.

2) Old, worn out, or shabby clothes, ornaments &c.

3) Clothes in general.

4) Childish language.

5) A learned man.

--- OR ---

Lāta (लात).—p. p. Taken, received.

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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