Navaka; 4 Definition(s)

Introduction

Navaka means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Navaka in Pali glossary... « previous · [N] · next »

navaka : (m.) a new comer; a young person. (nt.), a group of nine.

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

Navaka, (adj. -n.) (Sk. navaka) young; a young man, a newly ordained bhikkhu (opp. thera), novice (cp. Divy 404) J. I, 33 (saṅgha°); PvA. 76 (id.).—Freq. in compar. navakatara a younger one, or the youngest (opp. theratara) D. II, 154; J. I, 218; Miln. 24. (Page 348)

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary
Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

navakā (नवका).—a Commonly navakhā.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Navaka (नवक).—a. consisting of nine.

-kam The aggregate of nine.

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

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The third chapter of the Navaka Nipata of the Anguttara Nikaya. A.iv.390-409.
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