Nagabala, aka: Nāgabala, Nāgabalā, Naga-bala; 4 Definition(s)

Introduction

Nagabala means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Rasashastra (chemistry and alchemy)

Nāgabalā (नागबला):—One of the sixty-seven Mahauṣadhi, as per Rasaśāstra texts (rasa literature). These drugs are useful for processing mercury (rasa), such as the alchemical processes known as sūta-bandhana and māraṇa.

Source: Wisdom Library: Rasa-śāstra
Rasashastra book cover
context information

Rasashastra (रसशास्त्र, rasaśāstra) is an important branch of Ayurveda, specialising in chemical interactions with herbs, metals and minerals. Some texts combine yogic and tantric practices with various alchemical operations. The ultimate goal of Rasashastra is not only to preserve and prolong life, but also to bestow wealth upon humankind.

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India history and geogprahy

Nagabala is the name of a herb (oshadhi) mentioned in the Kathasaritsagara by Somadeva (10th century A.D). Nagabala refers to a “healing herb”, collected from the jungle.

Somadeva mentions many rich forests, gardens, various trees, creepers medicinal and flowering plants (eg., Nagabala) and fruit-bearing trees in the Kathasaritsagara. Gardens of herbs were specially maintained in big cities. Somadeva’s writing more or less reflects the life of the people of Northern India during the 11th century. His Kathasaritsagara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Nagabala, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravahanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyadharas (celestial beings).

Source: Shodhganga: Cultural history as g leaned from kathasaritsagara
India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Nagabala in Pali glossary... « previous · [N] · next »

nāgabala : (adj.) having the strength of an elephant. || nāgabalā (f.), a kind of creeping plant.

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary
Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Nagabala in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [N] · next »

Nāgabala (नागबल).—an epithet of Bhīma.

Derivable forms: nāgabalaḥ (नागबलः).

Nāgabala is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms nāga and bala (बल).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

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Bala
Bala (बल) participated in the war between Rāma and Rāvaṇa, on the side of the latter, as mentio...
Naga
Nāga (नाग) represents “state of desirelessness”, referring to one of the attributes of Lord Śiv...
Nagara
Nagara (नगर) or Nagari is the name of an ancient locality situated in Majjhimadesa (Middle...
Mahabala
Mahābalā (महाबला) is another name for Vatsādanī, a medicinal plant identified with Cocculus hir...
Balaka
Balāka (बलाक).—(VALĀKA). A forester. This forester used to go for hunting and he gave everythin...
Nagari
Nagari (नगरि) or Nagara is the name of an ancient locality situated in Majjhimadesa (Middl...
Baladeva
Baladeva (बलदेव) refers to a deity that was once worshipped in ancient Kashmir (Kaśmīra) accord...
Nagavana
Nāgavana (नागवन) is the name of a forest situated in Majjhimadesa (Middle Country) of ancient I...
Nagadvipa
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Balarama
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Nagaloka
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Nagapura
Nāgapura is the name of an ancient locality possibly corresponding to the modern Nāgaon, as men...
Balabhadra
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Nagapasha
Nāgapāśa (नागपाश).—1) a sort of magical noose used in battle to entangle an enemy. 2) Name of t...
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