Mura: 12 definitions

Introduction

Mura means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Google Books: The Purana Index

Mura (मुर):—An Asura of five heads; got up from sleep under waters o nhearing the sound of Pāñcajanya: His head was cut off by Kṛṣṇa. His seven sons rose with Pīṭha, their commander, and were put to death by Garuḍa in charge of the outskirts of the city of Prāgjyotiṣa; father of 7000 sons.

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

1) Mura (मुर).—A ferocious asura. Birth and acquisition of boons. Mura was the asura born to Kaśyapaprajāpati of his wife Danu. Once Mura was shocked to find the huge heap of dead bodies of the asuras killed by the devas. Mura got afraid of death and did penance for years to propitiate his grandfather and Brahmā appeared before him and asked him to name the boon he wanted. Mura said "Lord, anybody whom I touch with my hands in a battle, even if they are immortal, should die." Brahmā the father of the universe granted him the boon. (Chapter 60, Vāmana Purāṇa). (See full article at Story of Mura from the Puranic encyclopaedia by Vettam Mani)

2) Mura (मुर).—Son of Tālajaṅgha, an asura born of a part of Brahmā. The capital of this valorous Murāsura was in the city of Candravatī.

2) Murāsura who possessed the brilliance of Brahmā was a nightmare to the devas. Once Murāsura fought against Viṣṇu and in the fierce fight that took place Viṣṇu was defeated and he ran away from the battlefield and started sleeping in a cave named Siṃhavatī in the neighbourhood of Badarikāśrama. Mura went there too. Then Mahāviṣṇu created a Devī through his Yogamāyā and made her kill Mura. Pleased at the slaughter of Mura, Viṣṇu blessed her and said "From today onwards you will be known as 'Ekādaśī'. You will be capable of wiping off all sins on earth." (Padmapurāṇa, Uttarakhaṇḍa 36. 50-80).

3) Mura (मुर).—(muru) A Yādava King. He was one of the neighbours of Jarāsandha. The daughter of this Yādava king called Kāmakaṭaṅkaṭā was married to Ghaṭotkaca. (13. 13. Sabhā Parva and Skanda Purāṇa).

4) Mura (मुर).—(muru) A country of ancient Bhārata. A King called Bhagadatta was the King of this country. (Śloka 14, Chapter 14, Sabhā Parva).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Mura (मुर).—An Asura of five heads; got up from sleep under waters on hearing the sound of Pāñcajanya (s.v): His head was cut off by Kṛṣṇa. His seven sons rose with Pīṭha, their commander, and were put to death by Garuḍa in charge of the outskirts of the city of Prāgjyotiṣa; father of 7000 sons.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa X. 59. 6-19; 37. 16; III. 3. 11; IV. 26. 24; Viṣṇu-purāṇa V. 29. 17-18.
Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Mura (मुर) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. II.13.13, VIII.4.52) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Mura) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Discover the meaning of mura in the context of Purana from relevant books on Exotic India

India history and geogprahy

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Murā.—(EI 33), a measure of capacity; cf. muraka. Note: murā is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

Discover the meaning of mura in the context of India history from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

murā (मुरा) [or मुरामासा, murāmāsā].—m The name of a freshwater-fish.

--- OR ---

mūra (मूर).—f (muraṇēṃ) A concealed vent; any transuding or oozing place (as through a dam or an embankment) for water. 2 Looseness of consistence in a soil or a substance; facility of transmission or absortion of water; permeableness, porousness. 3 Oozing, exuding. 4 Wastage, loss by leakage, dryage, spillage, or wastage of any form. 5 Sediment (i. e. wastage or loss) in preparing or in reheating clarified butter. 6 Loss (sinking of money) in trade or business. v . Ex. hyā rōjagārānta mūra ālī. 7 (Power of swallowing up or absorbing.) Room, capacity of containing. Ex. hyā kaṇagīnta khaṇḍībhara dhānyācī mūra āhē. 8 (In wood or stone.) Crack, softness, dryness, or other flaw.

--- OR ---

mūra (मूर).—n W Dew.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

mūra (मूर).—f A concealed vent. Oozing. Po- rousness. Loss. n Dew.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

Discover the meaning of mura in the context of Marathi from relevant books on Exotic India

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Mura (मुर).—Encompassing, surrounding.

Derivable forms: muram (मुरम्).

--- OR ---

Mura (मुर).—Name of a demon slain by Kṛṣṇa; पार्थेनाथ द्विषन्मुरम् (pārthenātha dviṣanmuram) Śi.2.1.

-rā Name of a fragrant plant.

-ram Encompassing, surrounding.

Derivable forms: muraḥ (मुरः).

--- OR ---

Mūra (मूर).—a. Ved.

1) Stupefied, bewildered.

2) Foolish, silly, stupid.

3) Destroying, killing.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mura (मुर).—m.

(-raḥ) The name of a Daitya killed by Vishnu. f.

(-rā) table perfume. n.

(-raṃ) Surrounding, encircling. E. mura to encircle, aff. ka, or aṅ and ṭāp fem. aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mura (मुर).—m. The name of a Daitya killed by Viṣṇu.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mura (मुर).—[masculine] [Name] of a demon slain by Kṛṣṇa.

--- OR ---

Mūra (मूर).—1. [adjective] stupid, dull.

--- OR ---

Mūra (मूर).—2. [adjective] rushing, impetuous.

--- OR ---

Mūra (मूर).—3. [neuter] = mūla.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Mura (मुर):—[from mur] 1. mura n. encompassing, surrounding, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

2) Murā (मुरा):—[from mura > mur] a f. See 2. mura.

3) Mura (मुर):—[from mur] 2. mura m. Name of a Daitya slain by Kṛṣṇa, [Mahābhārata; Harivaṃśa; Bhāgavata-purāṇa] (cf. muru)

4) Murā (मुरा):—[from mura > mur] b f. a species of fragrant plant (named after the Daitya), [Bhāvaprakāśa]

5) [v.s. ...] said to be the Name of the wife of Nanda and mother of Candragupta, [Viṣṇu-purāṇa]

6) Mura (मुर):—[from mur] n. See under 1, mura.

7) Mūra (मूर):—1. mūra mf(ā)n. (either = mūḍha or [from] √mṝ) dull, stupid, foolish, [Ṛg-veda; Pañcaviṃśa-brāhmaṇa]

8) 2. mūra mfn. ([from] √1. = mīv) rushing, impetuous (said of Indra’s horses), [Ṛg-veda iii 43, 6] ([Sāyaṇa] = māraka).

9) 3. mūra n. ([probably] also [from] √1. and meaning ‘something firm and fixed’ cf. [Kāśikā-vṛtti on Pāṇini 8-2, 18]) = mūla, a root, [Atharva-veda i, 28, 3.]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of mura in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

See also (Relevant definitions)

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: