Milita, Mīlita: 17 definitions

Introduction:

Milita means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Milit.

In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: archive.org: The mirror of gesture (abhinaya-darpana)

A type of glance (or facial expression): Mīlita: nearly closed. Usage: conditions such as subjection to another’s will.

Source: Shodhganga: Mankhaka a sanskrit literary genius (natya)

Mīlita (मीलित, “lost”) refers to a type of Alaṃkāra (figure of speech).—When something is concealed (covered up) by another possessing a similar characteristic, there is Mīlita. Herein, the thing having a common characteristic (or rather the characteristic itself) may be inherent or adventitious.

Natyashastra book cover
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Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (shastra) of performing arts, (natya—theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing Dramatic plays (nataka), construction and performance of Theater, and Poetic works (kavya).

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Nighantu (Synonyms and Characteristics of Drugs and technical terms)

Source: Wisdom Library: Raj Nighantu

Milita (मिलित) or Mīlita refers to a “half-closed/half-opnened bud” (of a flower), as mentioned in a list of ten synonyms, according to the second chapter (dharaṇyādi-varga) of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu (an Ayurvedic encyclopedia). The Dharaṇyādi-varga covers the lands, soil, mountains, jungles and vegetation’s relations between trees [viz., Milita] and plants and substances, with their various kinds.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

1) Milita (मिलित) refers to a “meeting”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.8.—Accordingly, Nārada said to Himavat:—“[..] O lord of mountains, Śiva will become Ardhanārīśvara (half male and half female), with your daughter forming half the part of your body. Their meeting [i.e., milita] once again will be delightful. After propitiating lord Śiva, the lord of all, by the power of her penance, your daughter will take away half the body of Siva. By propitating Śiva with her penance she will acquire the lustre of gold and will be known as Svarṇagaurī. Your daughter will be as fair-complexioned as lightning. [...]”.

2) Mīlita (मीलित) (Cf. Nimīlita, Vinimīlita) refers to “closed” (e.g., closed eyes), according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.12.—Accordingly, after Himācala (i.e., Himālaya) brought his daughter (Pārvatī) before Śiva: “Then Śiva looked at her in the first flush of her youth. [...] On seeing Śiva the lord of all, the chief of those devoted to penance, the lord with the moon as his ornament, who can be known through spiritual insight and who was sitting in the meditative posture closing His eyes [i.e., vini-mīlita-īkṣaṇa], Himācala saluted Him again. Though he was not disheartened, he entertained some doubts. Thus he, the lord of mountains, foremost of the eloquent, spoke to Śiva, the sole kinsman of the universe”.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (philosophy)

Milita (मिलित) refers to “connected (atoms)”, according to the Viṃśikāvṛtti 7.—Accordingly, “Therefore two connected [atoms] (milita) cannot bring about a form larger [than one single atom], and the same must be said if another, [third atom] gets in contact [with them]—this is what [Utpaladeva explains] with ‘[even if] an infinite [number] [...]’”.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Milita (मिलित) refers to “gathered together”, according to the Kularatnamālā (quoted in Tantrāloka verse 37.26).—Accordingly, “Kaula (doctrine), based on the (Tantras of) the left and the right, is the essence of all the Tantras gathered together (milita) in one place in the venerable teaching of the Trika”.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

mīlita (मीलित).—p S Mixed or mingled. 2 Met. 3 Met together; closed or shut by coming into contact. 4 Blended or brought into agreement.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Milita (मिलित).—p. p. [mil-kta]

1) Come together, assembled, encountered, combined.

2) Met, encountered.

3) Mixed.

4) Put together, taken in all.

--- OR ---

Mīlita (मीलित).—p. p. [mīl-kta]

1) Shut, closed.

2) Twinkled.

3) Half-opened, unblown.

4) Vanished, disappeared.

5) Assembled, gathered (for milita).

-tam (In Rhet.) A figure of speech in which the difference or distinction between two objects is shown to be completely obscured on account of their similarity, whether natural or artificial, in some respects; it is thus defined by Mammaṭa :-समेन लक्ष्मणा वस्तु वस्तुना यन्निगूह्यते । निजेनागन्तुना वापि तन्मीलितमिति स्मृतम् (samena lakṣmaṇā vastu vastunā yannigūhyate | nijenāgantunā vāpi tanmīlitamiti smṛtam) || K. P.1.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Milita (मिलित).—mfn.

(-taḥ-tā-taṃ) 1. Mixed, united, combined, or connected with, 2. Found, met with, encountered. E. mil to mix, aff. kta .

--- OR ---

Mīlita (मीलित).—mfn.

(-taḥ-tā-taṃ) 1. Twinkled. 2. Unblown, partly opened, as a young bud, &c. n.

(-taṃ) Indirect allusion or description, (in rhetoric.) E. mīl to twinkle, aff. kta .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Milita (मिलित).—[adjective] met, joined, happened, occurred.

--- OR ---

Mīlita (मीलित).—[adjective] having closed the eyes, sleepy or asleep; closed, shut; vanished, disappeared, gone; also = milita.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Milita (मिलित):—[from mil] mfn. met, encountered, united etc.

2) [v.s. ...] happened, occurred, [Kāvya literature]

3) [v.s. ...] (ifc.) connected or combined or mixed or furnished with, [Pañcatantra]

4) Mīlita (मीलित):—[from mīl] mfn. one who has closed his eyes, sleepy (only [Comparative degree] ta-tara), [Śatapatha-brāhmaṇa]

5) [v.s. ...] closed, obstructed (opp. to mukta), [Pañcaviṃśa-brāhmaṇa]

6) [v.s. ...] closed, unblown, partly opened (as eyes, blossoms etc.), [Kāvya literature; Purāṇa]

7) [v.s. ...] disappeared, ceased to be, [Bhāgavata-purāṇa]

8) [v.s. ...] met, assembled, gathered together, [Rājataraṅgiṇī]

9) [v.s. ...] (in. [rhetoric]) an implied simile (in which the similarity between two objects is only implied, as in the example: ‘women clothed in white are invisible in the moonlight, therefore they are as bright as moonlight’), [Kāvyaprakāśa; Kuvalayānanda]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Milita (मिलित):—[(taḥ-tā-taṃ) a.] Mixed, united.

2) Mīlita (मीलित):—[(taḥ-tā-taṃ) a.] Unblown, partly opened. n. Indirect hint.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Milita (मिलित) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Milia, Melia.

[Sanskrit to German]

Milita in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

1) Milita (मिलित):—(a) met, come together, joined.

2) Mīlita (मीलित) [Also spelled milit]:—(a) closed, shut; contracted.

context information

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Milita (ಮಿಲಿತ):—

1) [adjective] joined; associated.

2) [adjective] mingled agreeably or coherently.

3) [adjective] made up of different or incongruous parts, groups, elements, classes, races, etc.; mixed.

4) [adjective] called upon; met.

--- OR ---

Milita (ಮಿಲಿತ):—[noun] a mixing or being mixed; the state or fact of being joined, associated or mixed.

--- OR ---

Miḷita (ಮಿಳಿತ):—

1) [adjective] joined; associated.

2) [adjective] mingled agreeably or coherently.

3) [adjective] made up of different or incongruous parts, groups, elements, classes, races, etc.; mixed.

4) [adjective] called upon; met.

--- OR ---

Miḷita (ಮಿಳಿತ):—[noun] a mixing or being mixed; the state or fact of being joined, associated or mixed.

--- OR ---

Mīlita (ಮೀಲಿತ):—

1) [adjective] closed; not open; shut.

2) [adjective] half open.

3) [adjective] gone out of sight; disappeared.

4) [adjective] gathered; assembled.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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