Matsyagandha, Matsya-gandha: 10 definitions

Introduction:

Matsyagandha means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Matsyagandha in Purana glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Matsyagandha (मत्स्यगन्ध).—An Ārṣeya Pravara (Bhārgava).*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 195. 43.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Kavya (poetry)

[«previous next»] — Matsyagandha in Kavya glossary
Source: Shodhganga: Bhismacaritam a critical study

Matsyagandhā (मत्स्यगन्धा) is another name for Satyavatī: one of the female character in the Bhīṣmacarita (Bhishma Charitra) which is a mahākāvya (‘epic poem’) written by Hari Narayan Dikshit.—Satyavatī was the queen of the Kuru King Śāntanu and the great-grandmother of the Pāṇḍava and Kaurava princes, principal characters of the Mahābhārata. According to the Purāṇas, she was born to the Cedi King Vasu (also known as Uparicara Vasu) and a fish, who was actually a celestial lady, Adrikā. But she was nevertheless brought up as a commoner, an adopted daughter to a ferryman or fisherman or a dāśeyī. She was also known as Matsyagandhā (one who has the smell of fish) in her earlier life and Yojanagandhā in her later life. Another name for her was Kali. She was sweet by her speech. [..., See Satyavatī]

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Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

[«previous next»] — Matsyagandha in Ayurveda glossary
Source: gurumukhi.ru: Ayurveda glossary of terms

Matsyagandha (मत्स्यगन्ध):—Smell of fish

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Matsyagandha in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Matsyagandha (मत्स्यगन्ध).—a. having the smell of fish.

-ndhā Name of Satyavatī.

Matsyagandha is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms matsya and gandha (गन्ध).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Matsyagandha (मत्स्यगन्ध).—f.

(-ndhā) 1. A plant, commonly Langaliya; (the common name is applied to the Nama zeylanica, and the commelina salicifolia.) 2. Satyabati, the mother of the sacred poet Vyasa: see matsyodarī. E. matsya a fish, and gandha smell.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Matsyagandha (मत्स्यगन्ध).—adj., f. dhā, smelling of fishes, Mahābhārata 1, 2398.

Matsyagandha is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms matsya and gandha (गन्ध).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Matsyagandha (मत्स्यगन्ध):—[=matsya-gandha] [from matsya > matsa] mf(ā)n. having the smell of f°, [Mahābhārata]

2) [v.s. ...] m. ([plural]) Name of a race, [Saṃskārakaustubha]

3) Matsyagandhā (मत्स्यगन्धा):—[=matsya-gandhā] [from matsya-gandha > matsya > matsa] f. Name of Satya-vatī (mother of Vyāsa, also called Mīna-gandha; See matsya above), [Mahābhārata]

4) [v.s. ...] Commelina Salicifolia, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) Mātsyagandha (मात्स्यगन्ध):—[=mātsya-gandha] [from mātsya > mātsika] m. [plural] ([from] matsya-gandha) Name of a race, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Matsyagandhā (मत्स्यगन्धा):—[matsya-gandhā] (ndhā) 1. f. A plant (Nama zeylanica) Vyāsa’s mother.

[Sanskrit to German]

Matsyagandha in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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