Karavi, Kāravī, Karavī: 7 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Karavi means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany

1) Kāravī (कारवी):—A Sanskrit word referring to the “Caraway” plant, a species of biennial plant from the Apiaceae (carrot) family of flowering plants. It is used throughout Ayurvedic literature such as the Caraka-saṃhitā. Its official botanical name is Carum carvi, but is commonly referred to in English as “meridian fennel” or “Persian cumin”. It is native to western Asia and Europe. The plant has finely divided, feathery leaves with thread-like divisions, growing on 20–30cm stems. It has small white or pink flowers in umbels. The fruits are crescent-shaped achenes, around 2mm long, with five pale ridges.

This plant (Kāravī) is also mentioned as a medicine used for the treatment of all major fevers, as described in the Jvaracikitsā (or “the treatment of fever”) which forms the first chapter of the Sanskrit work called Mādhavacikitsā.

2) Kāravī (कारवी):—A Sanskrit word referring to the “Black cumin” plant, a species of annual herb from the Ranunculaceae (crowfoot) family of flowering plants. It is also known as Kṛṣṇajīrakā or Upakuñcikā. It is used throughout Ayurvedic literature such as the Caraka-saṃhitā. Its official botanical name is Nigella sativa, but is commonly referred to in English as “black-caraway” or “small fennel” among others.

Source: WorldCat: Rāj nighaṇṭu

Kāravī (कारवी) is another name for Śatāhvā, an unidentified medicinal plant, according to verse 4.10-13 of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu. The fourth chapter (śatāhvādi-varga) of this book enumerates eighty varieties of small plants (pṛthu-kṣupa). Also see the description of the plant Miśreyā. Together with the names Kāravī and Śatāhvā, there are a total of twenty-four Sanskrit synonyms identified for this plant.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Karavī, (cp. Sk. kala-kaṇṭha cuckoo, & kalaviṅka sparrow) the Indian cuckoo J. VI, 539. (Page 196)

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

kāravī (कारवी).—f A tree. See kārava.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Kāravī (कारवी).—Name of many plants. (Mar. śopa, ovā, jireṃi.)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Karavī (करवी).—f. (-vī) The leaf of the Asafœtida plant, Hingupatri: see kavarī and kāravī.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Karavī (करवी):—f. the leaf of the plant Asa Foetida, [Suśruta] (cf. karvarī, kavarī, kāvarī.)

2) Kāravī (कारवी):—f. the Asa foetida plant or its leaf (= Hiṅgu-parṇī), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) Celosia cristata, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) a kind of anise (Anethum Sowa), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) Nigella indica, [Bhāvaprakāśa]

6) a kind of fennel, [ib.]

7) a small kind of gourd, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

8) Carum Carvi, [Bhāvaprakāśa]

9) Kārāvī (कारावी):—f. a small-sized house that may be taken to pieces, [Demetrius Galanos’s Lexiko: sanskritikes, anglikes, hellenikes]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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