Rasa Jala Nidhi, vol 2: Minerals (uparasa)

by Bhudeb Mookerjee | 1938 | 28,803 words | ISBN-10: 8170305829 | ISBN-13: 9788170305828

This second volume of the Rasa-jala-nidhi deals with the purification, incineration and medicinal uses of various minerals (uparasa), as well as preventing faults due to misuse. It is continued in the third volume which deals with the various metals. The Rasa-jala-nidhi (“the ocean of Iatrochemistry, or, chemical medicine) is a compendium of Sansk...

Part 4 - Process for creation of Dhanya-abhra (paddy mica)

Powdered mica, mixed with shali paddy, is to be contained in a piece of cloth, and formed into a bundle, which is to be kept immersed in kanji for some time. This is then to be rubbed with two hands, and pressed in the midst of kanji, with the result that very minute particles of mica will come out of the bundle, and deposit themselves at the bottom of the pot containing the kanji. These minute particles of mica are called, “Dhanya-abhra” or “paddy mica.”

First process.

Dhanya-abhra is to be rubbed carefully with the juice of matsyakshi, made into a cake, dried and subjected to heat by means of a half Gajaputa. This process is to be performed for six times. The mica is next to be rubbed with one-fourth its weight of tankana and a sufficient quantity of the juice of punarnava, and then made into a cake which is to be subjected to heat by means of a half Gaja-puta. The process is to be performed for seven times. It is similarly to be subjected to puta for seven times each, after having been previously rubbed with the juices of basaka and tanduliyaka. Mica, thus incinerated, may be used in medicines as well as in metallurgical operations.

Second process.

Dhanya-abhra is incinerated, if it is subjected to puta for ten times, after having been rubbed each time with the juice of kasamarda. The same purpose is served, if the juice of musta or of tanduliya is used instead of kasamarda.

Third process.

Mica is incinerated and assumes the colour of red vermilion, if it is subjected to puta for six times, after having been rubbed each time, with haritala, the juice of amalaki, and tankana, This mica cures pthisis and all other diseases, if used with suitable anupana or accompaniment.

Fourth process.

Mica is incinerated and assumes the colour of red vermilion, if subjected to puta for 20 times, after having been rubbed each time with the juice of any one of the following:—(1) bark of the root of a banyan tree, (2) leaves of tambuli (betel) plant, (3) basa and matsyakshi, (4) matsyakshi and karaballi, or (5) milk of banyan tree.

Fifth process.

Mica is incinerated by being subjected to puta for three times, after having been subjected to bhavana, each time, with the juice of eranda leaves, mixed with molasses. Mica, thus incinerated, increases appetite to a great extent, and cures all sorts of diseases, if taken in doses of half a gunja a day, combined with suitable anupana.

Sixth process.

Dhanya-abhraka is to be subjected to Gaja-puta, after having been rubbed for one day with the juice of punamava. It is next to be subjected to Gaja-puta, after having been rubbed for one day with the juice of meghanada. It is then to be subjected to puta for three times, after having been rubbed with the juices of tamarind, mustaka, and shurana, respectively. It is next to be covered with the leaves of arka or with the petals of banana flower, and subjected to puta. Thus treated, mica becomes deprived of its glaze, and may be used in medicines and metallurgy.

Seventh process.

Dhanya-abhra is to be roasted with cow’s ghee and decoction of triphalas, and subjected to puta for twenty five times. It is next to be roasted with the juice of kasamarda. It is then to be subjected to puta for three times, having previously been rubbed with milk, every time. The mica, thus deprived of its glaze, may be used in medicines for the removal of diseases, senility, and premature death.

Eighth process.

One part of Dhanya-abhra and two parts of tankana are to be rubbed together and subjected to heat in a blind crucible by means of a strong fire. When cooled of itself, after the extinction of fire, the mica finely powdered, can be used in all sorts of diseases.

Ninth process.

Dhanya-abhra is, first of all, to be rubbed with a sour vegetable juice and subjected to putam, while still hot, it is to be saturated with a sour vegetable juice, rubbed well, and subjected to bhavana with sour aranala. It is next to be boiled with aranala which is to be dried by the application of heat. This process is to be performed for 20 times, either by heating in the ordinary way or by puta. Care should be taken that heating is commenced in a succeding stage, while the mica is still hot by the preceding heating.

Next, the mica is to be immersed, while still hot, in milk, rubbed with it, and dried up by application of heat. Then, while still hot, it is to be subjected to puta, and then while still hot, is to be soaked with fresh milk, which is to be dried up by heat. This process of soaking and rubbing the mica with milk, and then drying it up by application of heat, and then subjecting it to puta is to be performed 21 times. It is to be turned frequently in a cauldron or in an earthen pot, at the time it is roasted, after it has been soaked and rubbed with milk.

It is next to be roasted for seven days, during day time, and subjected to puta at night.

The mica is then to be rubbed for three days each with the juices of tanduliaka (tandulika?), asthisanhara, talamuli, punarnava, changeri, maricha, and bala, and subjected to puta after every act of rubbing. The prescribed juice, in this case, is to be rubbed with, the mica, while it is still hot by the previous puta, and the rubbing is to take place in the hot samputa itself. Mica, thus incinerated, turns black.

Tenth process.

Purified Dhanya-abhra with one tenth its weight of maricha is to be rubbed with the amla-varga, and then subjected to bhavana with a sour vegetable liquid for three days. When dried, it is to be subjected to puta by a strong fire made of khadira wood. After removal of the upper basin, the mica is to be saturated with a sour vegetable liquid. It is then to be rubbed with the juices of the root, bark, and leaves, respectively, of basaka, shigru, and punarnava, and then saturated for six times with six different kinds of sour vegetable juices. The mica is then to be rubbed, with sugar, honey, clarified butter, cow’s milk, curd, amlas, juices of matsyakhshi, and karabira, for three times, and subjected to puta each time with the result that it is incinerated and deprived of its glaze.

Eleventh process.

Dhanyabhraka is to be rubbed for one day with the juice of each of the following:—matsyakhshi, tulasi, root of kokilaksha, root of kanya, root of white durva, byaghri-kanda, and punarnava, and subjected to heat in a Gaja-puta after each day’s rubbing. Every act of rubbing in this case is to be effected while the mica is still hot by a previous heating. The mica is similarly to be rubbed with the panchamitra and then heated by means of a Gajaputa for seven times. The mica, thus deprived of its glaze, may be used in all sorts of diseases.

Twelfth process.

Dhanya-abhra and an equal quantity of tankana are to be rubbed together with each of the following, and subjected to puta after every act of rubbing is performed:—Cow’s urine, juice of tulasi, juice of bakuchi, and juice of shurana. It is next to be rubbed with the juice of jayanti, and subjected to puta for three times. All this process, performed for four times, deprives the mica of its glaze, and makes it fit for use in all sorts of diseases.

Thirteenth process.

Dhanya-abhra is to be rubbed with the milk of arka or with the juice of the root of arka, and then subjected to puta. Performance of this process for seven times causes the incineration of mica.

Fourteenth process.

Dhanya-abhra is to be immersed in kanji and kept exposed to the sun for one day. It is then to be rubbed for twelve hours, made into a lump, and heated by Gajaputa, It is next to be immersed in cow’s milk in the same way and similarly rubbed and heated. It is then to be immersed in the juice of cotton leaves, exposed to the sun for one day, and then rubbed and heated, as before. The mica is then to be dried in tile sun, and heated by puta over and over again, after having been rubbed each time with one of the following in order of their occurrence:—sour vegetable juices, juice of cotton leaves, and cow’s milk. Twenty-one such putas will cause the incineration of the mica.

Fifteenth process.

Dhanya-abhra is to be duly dried up, and rubbed for one day with the milk of arka or the juice of arka roots. It is then to be wrapped up with arka leaves and heated by Gajaputa. This process is to be performed carefully for seven times. The mica is then to be rubbed with a decoction of the aerial roots of a banyan tree, and then heated by puta. The last mentioned process is to be performed for three times, leading to the incineration of mica, which may now be used in all sorts of diseases.

Sixteenth process.

Dhanya-abhra is to be rubbed for three times, with decoction of musta, and heated every time by a puta, It is then to be rubbed for three times, with each of the following, and subjected to puta after each act of rubbing:—juice of punarnava, juice of kasamarda, juice of tambula, milk of arka, decoction of aerial roots of banyan, juice of mushali, decoction of gokshura, juice of banari, juice of the tuber of banana, juice of kokilaksha, and juice of lodhra. The mica is then to be rubbed for one time with each of the following and heated by puta, after every act of rubbing—juice of lodhra, milk, curd, clarified butter, honey, and white sugar. Mica, thus incinerated, cures all sorts of disease, if applied with suitable anupana. It increases masculine strength, power of retention of semen, nutrition, longevity, growth of semen, retentive faculties, and the power of begetting children.

Seventeenth process.

Mica is to be rubbed with the juice of a banana plant and salt, and made into a ball, which is to, be kept inside tankana. This is then to be put inside a hole made into the root of snuhi or arka, the hole being closed tightly with a portion of the same root. The whole thing is new to be subjected to heat by a fire made of charcoal, and kept kindled by a fan.

Eighteenth process.

Mica is incinerated and assumes the colour of a lotus flower, if subjected to puta for a hundred times, after having been rubbed well with each of the following milk of banyan, milk of arka, milk of snuhi, juice of kanya, juice of musta, man’s urine, juice of the aerial roots of banyan tree, and goat’s blood.

Nineteenth process.

Dhanya-abhra is incinerated, if subjected to puta for one thousand times, after having been rubbed each time with cow’s urine.

Twentieth process.

Dhanya-abhra, properly dried, an equal quantity of musta, and six times its weight of shunthi, are to be rubbed for one day each with kanji and the juice of chitraka, and then subjected to Gajaputa. It is then to be rubbed with the decoction of triphala, and subjected to puta in the same manner for three times. It is next to be rubbed with each of the following, and heated by puta, for three times, after each act of rubbing:—juice or decoction of bala, cow’s urine, juice of mushali, juice of tulasi, and juice of shurana.

Twenty-first process.

Dhanya-abhra is to be rubbed, first of all, with the juice of changeri, and then with the juice of tanduliyaka, It is then to be heated, by means of khadira wood, and, when red hot, to be thrown into milk, The process is to be repeated until the mica is deprived of its glaze.

Twenty second process.

Dhanya-abhra with an equal quantity of molasses is to be rubbed with excellent milk, made into a cake, dried, and then heated by Gajaputa. It is next to be rubbed separately with the juice of each of the following, and subjected to heat by Gajaputa, everytime it is so rubbed:—dhattura, gaja pippali, kanya, and utpala. Mica, thus treated, becomes incinerated.

Twenty third process.

Dhanya-abhra is to be rubbed with the juice of any grass and subjected to puta. Performance of this process for ten times will lead to the incineration of the mica, which will also be deprived of its glaze,

Twenty-fourth process.

Two parts of Dhanya-abhra and one part of purified sulphur are to be rubbed together with the milk of banyan, and subjected to Gajaputa for once only. This will result in the incineration of mica.

Twenty-fifth process.

Dhanya-abhra is incinerated and cures all sorts of diseases, if rubbed with each of the following for seven times, and subjected to puta after every act of rubbing punarnava, kumari, shunthi, banari, mushali, ikshu, amalaki, milk of arka, and milk of shehundu.

Twenty sixth process.

Dhanya-abhra, duly purified, especially with decoction of triphala, is to be kept immersed, for forty days, in four times its quantity of shukta.[1] Then, two tolas of purified mercury, four tolas of fresh babbula flower, and four tolas of fresh gum of babbula, are to be rubbed together, made into a ball which is to be thrown into the shukta. The whole thing is next to be turned by means of a rod every day, for three days only, (and by no means for a longer period) and after the expiry of these days, to be rubbed together in a mortar and made into a cake, when sufficiently condensed. This cake is to be dried in the sun and heated in a Gajaputa. It is next to be rubbed with a fresh quantity of shukta for one day only, and then subjected to puta by a fire made of cowdung cakes, found dried in the pasturage. These last two processes, viz. rubbing with a fresh quantity of shukta, and heating by cowdung cakes, if performed for three times, result in the incineration of the mica. If taken in doses of one gunja a day, it even enables a blind man to recover his eye sight. It also cures all sorts of diseases, and especially, indigestion, impurities of blood, gonorrhoea, carbuncles, abnormal thirst, leprosy, enlargement of spleen, diseases pertaining to the belly and the stomach, scrofula, worms, and consumption. It is moreover very nutritive.

Twenty-seventh process.

Dhanyabhra is to be rubbed for seven days with each of the following during day time, and heated by Gaja puta every corresponding night:—milk of arka, cow’s milk; juices of—brahmi, rudanti, bala, basa, chitraka, shalmali, vilba, haritaki, kushmanda, dadima, jati, gokshura, shankha-puspi, meda, ananta-mula, barbari, draksha, mula, rakshasi (muramansi), tulasi, mundi, indrabaruni, mada (dhataki flower), gojihva, vidari creeper, shringi (karkata-shringi), bacha, jatamansi, shata-puspa, and arka. The mica is next to be subjected to bhavana for twenty times with each of the two juices, viz, the juice of the aerial roots of banyan, and the juice of kesharaja, and heated by puta after every such act of bhavana. It is next to be rubbed separately.with the juices of kapittha and seeds of chinchini (tamarind), and heated by puta after each act of rubbing. It is next to be subjected to puta for fifteen times, after having been rubbed each time with the following, mixed together:—lemon juice, cow’s milk, solution of molasses, curd, khanda-guda, clarified butter, and pure honey. Thus treated, the mica will be deprived of its glaze and assume a red appearance. This will then be fit for use by kings.

Twenty eighth process.

Mica is to be rubbed with each of the following:—nagabala, bhadramusta, milk of banyan, juice of the aerial roots of banyan, juice of haridra, and subjected to puta after its being rubbed with each of them. Mica thus incinerated, assumes a red appearance.

Twenty-ninth process.

Dhany-abhra is to be rubbed with the juice of matsyakshi, made into a cake, dried, and then heated in a Gaja-puta. It is thus to be rubbed with the juice of punarnava and heated by Gaja-puta for six times. It is next to be rubbed with one sixteenth its weight of tankana, made into a cake, and heated by fire being applied on the upperside of the samputa (containing the cake) which is to be in a pit made in the earth. This, process of rubbing with tankana and heating is to be performed for seven times. It is next to be rubbed with each of the following for seven times each, and heated in the aforesaid way after its being rubbed each time:—juice of basa, and juice of tanduliyaka. Mica, thus incinerated, may be used in all sorts of diseases.

Thirtieth process.

Vajra-abhra is to be rubbed in a mortar with hot milk of cow, and heated by a mild fire in an iron cauldron, mixed with a little of clarified butter, This mica, with shali paddy, contained in a piece of cloth, made into a bundle, is to be rubbed in kanji with the result that minute particles of mica will come out through the cloth. These particles are called “Dhanya-abhra”, and they are pure. This mica is incinerated, if rubbed with each of the following drugs (not exceeding one in a day) during day time, then dried in the sun, and heated by puta by means of cow-dung cakes, at night.[2]

The names of the drugs and their sequence are as follows milks of arka, banyan, bajri, and kanya; juices of eranda roots, jaba-tikta, musta, guduchi, bhanga, gokshura, bartakini (kantakari), shalaparni, prisniparni, sveta sarshapa, apamarga, aerial roots of a banyan tree, vilba, agnimantha, chitraka, tinduka, haritaki, patali, amalaki, bibhitaki, kumbhi growing in water, talisha-patra, talamuli, basaka, asvagandha, kesharaja, kadali (plantain), saptaparni, dhattura, lodhra, devadaru, tulsi, durba, white durba, kasamarda, maricha, dadima, kakamachi, shankhapuspi, nata, tambula, punarnava, brahmi, indra-baruni, bhargi, devadali, kapittha, shivalingi, katu-rohini, kinshuka, koshataki, indura-parni, minakshi, karavi, tilaparni, kumbhi, ardraka, shatabari, goat’s blood, and cow’s urine.

Footnotes and references:

1.

Shukta is prepared as follows:—One prastha of boiled rice made into a paste (by being overboiled, robbed, and sifted through a piece of fine cloth), 20 prasthas of kanji, 30 tolas of curd, one prastha of molasses, 32 tolas of the residues of kanji, 64 tolas of shunthi, and eight tolas of pippali, jira, saindhava, haridra, and maricha, combined—all these things are to be kept for eight days, in an earthen vessel, previously soaked with clarified butter. It is then to be filtered and mixed with three tolas each of guda tvaka, ela, naga-keshara, and patri.

2.

This includes the process of preparing dhanya-abhra.

Conclusion:

Rasasastra category This concludes ‘Process for creation of Dhanya-abhra (paddy mica)’ included in Bhudeb Mookerjee’s Rasa Jala Nidhi, vol 2: Minerals (uparasa). The text includes treatments, recipes and remedies and is categorised as Rasa Shastra: an important branch of Ayurveda that specialises in medicinal/ herbal chemistry, alchemy and mineralogy, for the purpose of prolonging and preserving life.

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