Garta, Gartā: 11 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Garta means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Gart.

In Hinduism

Dharmashastra (religious law)

Source: Wisdom Library: Dharma-śāstra

Garta (गर्त) is a Sanskrit word referring to water-stream whose course do not run beyond 2004 yards. The word is used throughout Dharmaśāstra literature such as the Manusmṛti. (also see the Manubhāṣya verse 4.203)

Dharmashastra book cover
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Dharmashastra (धर्मशास्त्र, dharmaśāstra) contains the instructions (shastra) regarding religious conduct of livelihood (dharma), ceremonies, jurisprudence (study of law) and more. It is categorized as smriti, an important and authoritative selection of books dealing with the Hindu lifestyle.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Garta (गर्त).—A son of Vasiṣṭha and Ūrjā.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 11. 41.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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India history and geography

Source: archive.org: Personal and geographical names in the Gupta inscriptions

Garta (गर्त) refers to a name-ending for place-names according to Pāṇini VI.2.126. Pāṇini also cautions his readers that the etymological meaning of place-names should not be held authoritative since the name should vanish when the people leave the place who gave their name to it.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Garta or Gartā.—(EI 3, 27; CII 3), a trench or pit; a boundary trench; a pit or valley; cf. sa-garta-uṣara (IE 8-5); also found as the termination of names of villages. Note: garta is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Garta (गर्त) or Gartā (गर्ता).—[gṝ-tan Uṇ.3.86]

1) A hollow, hole, cave; ससत्त्वेषु गर्तेषु (sasattveṣu garteṣu) Ms.4.47,23.

2) A grave.

-rtaḥ 1 The hollow of the loins.

2) A kind of disease.

3) Name of a country, a part the Trigartas q. v.

4) Ved. A throne.

5) A chariot; the seat of a chariot; तिष्ठद्धरी अध्यस्तेव गर्ते (tiṣṭhaddharī adhyasteva garte) Rv.6.2.9.

6) A table for playing at dice.

7) A house.

8) The post of an assembly room.

Derivable forms: gartaḥ (गर्तः), gartam (गर्तम्).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Garta (गर्त).— (probably 2. gṛ10), m., f. , and n. 1. A hole, Mahābhārata 1, 1034; [Pañcatantra] 81, 22; Mahābhārata 7, 4953. 2. A ditch, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 4, 47; 203.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Garta (गर्त).—1. [masculine] high seat, throne; the seat of a warchariot, carriage i.[grammar]

--- OR ---

Garta (गर्त).—2. [masculine] [neuter], ā [feminine] hollow, cave, ditch, grave; a water-hole (only [masculine]).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Garta (गर्त):—1. garta m. a high seat, throne (of Mitra and Varuṇa), [Ṛg-veda] (‘a house’ [Naighaṇṭuka, commented on by Yāska])

2) the seat of a war-chariot, [vi, 20, 9]

3) ([Nirukta, by Yāska iii, 5]) a chariot, [Gautama-dharma-śāstra xvi, 7]

4) a table for playing at dice, [Nirukta, by Yāska iii, 5.]

5) 2. garta m. (= karta q.v.) a hollow, hole, cave, grave, [Śatapatha-brāhmaṇa xiv; Śāṅkhāyana-brāhmaṇa; Āśvalāyana-gṛhya-sūtra; Śāṅkhāyana-gṛhya-sūtra; Kauśika-sūtra; Mahābhārata] etc.

6) a canal, [Manu-smṛti iv, 203]

7) the hollow of the loins, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

8) a kind of disease, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

9) Name of a country (part of Tri-garta, in the north-west of India), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.] (cf. [Pāṇini 4-2, 137])

10) n. a hole, cave, [Mahābhārata vii, 4953]

11) Gartā (गर्ता):—[from garta] a f. a hole, cave, [Pañcatantra i; ii, 6, 34/35]

12) [v.s. ...] Name of a river, [Śiva-purāṇa]

13) [from garta] b f. of ta q.v.

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Sanskrit-Wörterbuch in kürzerer Fassung

Garta (गर्त):—1. m.

1) hoher Stuhl , Thron.

2) der Sitz des Streitwagens.

3) Wagen [Gautama's Dharmaśāstra] —

4) *Würfeltisch.

5) *Haus , Gemach.

--- OR ---

Garta (गर्त):—2. —

1) m. f. ( ā) und n. Grube , Loch , Grab.

2) m. — a) Kanal [Mānavadharmaśāstra. 4,203.] — b) Lendenhöhle. — c) *eine best. Krankheit. — d) *Nomen proprium eines Theiles von Trigarta. — e) mit garbha verwechselt. —

3) f. ā Nomen proprium eines Flusses.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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